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Author (up) Leung, L.; Grundy, A.; Siemiatycki, J.; Arseneau, J.; Gilbert, L.; Gotlieb, W.H.; Provencher, D.M.; Aronson, K.J.; Koushik, A.
Title Shift Work Patterns, Chronotype, and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: Shift work causing circadian disruption is classified as a 'probable carcinogen' and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hormone-sensitive cancers. This study investigated shift work exposure in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study with 496 EOC cases and 906 controls, lifetime occupational histories were collected and used to calculate cumulative years of shift work exposure, average number of night shifts per month, and average number of consecutive night shifts per month. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with EOC risk were estimated using logistic regression. Associations were also examined according to chronotype and menopausal status. RESULTS: Over half of the cases (53.4%) and controls (51.7%) worked evening and/or night shifts. There was no clear pattern of increasing EOC risk with increasing years of shift work; the adjusted OR (95%CI) of EOC comparing the highest shift work category vs. never working shift work was 1.20 (0.89-1.63). This association was more pronounced among those self-identified as having a “morning” chronotype (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.01-2.65). Associations did not greatly differ by menopausal status. CONCLUSION: These results do not strongly demonstrate a relationship between shift work and EOC risk. IMPACT: This study collected detailed shift work information and examined shift work patterns according to shift times and schedules. The findings highlight that chronotype should be considered in studies of shift work as an exposure.
Address Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal anita.koushik@umontreal.ca
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ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30842128 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2261
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Author (up) Papantoniou, K.; Pozo, O.J.; Espinosa, A.; Marcos, J.; Castano-Vinyals, G.; Basagana, X.; Ribas, F.C.; Mirabent, J.; Martin, J.; Carenys, G.; Martin, C.R.; Middleton, B.; Skene, D.J.; Kogevinas, M.
Title Circadian variation of melatonin, light exposure, and diurnal preference in day and night shift workers of both sexes Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume 23 Issue 7 Pages 1176-1186
Keywords Human Health, physiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Light-at-night has been shown in experimental studies to disrupt melatonin production but this has only partly been confirmed in studies of night shift workers. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the circadian variation of melatonin in relation to shift status, individual levels of light-at-night exposure, and diurnal preference, an attribute reflecting personal preference for activity in the morning or evening. METHODS: One hundred and seventeen workers (75 night and 42 day) of both sexes, ages 22 to 64 years, were recruited from four companies. Participants collected urine samples from all voids over 24 hours and wore a data logger continuously recording their light exposure. Sociodemographic, occupational, lifestyle, and diurnal preference information were collected by interview. Concentrations of urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), the main melatonin metabolite, were measured. RESULTS: Mean aMT6s levels were lower in night [10.9 ng/mg creatinine/hour; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9.5-12.6] compared with day workers (15.4; 95% CI, 12.3-19.3). The lowest aMT6s levels were observed in night workers with morning preference (6.4; 95% CI, 3.0-13.6). Peak time of aMT6s production occurred 3 hours later in night (08:42 hour, 95% CI, 07:48-09:42) compared with day workers (05:36 hour, 95% CI, 05:06-06:12). Phase delay was stronger among subjects with higher light-at-night exposure and number of nights worked. CONCLUSIONS: Night shift workers had lower levels and a delay in peak time of aMT6s production over a 24-hour period. Differences were modified by diurnal preference and intensity of light-at-night exposure. IMPACT: Night shift work affects levels and timing of melatonin production and both parameters may relate to future cancer risk.
Address Authors' Affiliations: Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL); IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (UPF); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece
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ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24812038 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1111
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Author (up) Peplonska, B.; Bukowska, A.; Sobala, W.; Reszka, E.; Gromadzinska, J.; Wasowicz, W.; Lie, J.A.; Kjuus, H.; Ursin, G.
Title Rotating night shift work and mammographic density Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume 21 Issue 7 Pages 1028-1037
Keywords Adult; Breast/*pathology; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology/*pathology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Melatonin/urine; Middle Aged; *Midwifery; *Nursing Staff; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract BACKGROUND: An increased risk of breast cancer has been observed in night shift workers. Exposure to artificial light at night and disruption of the endogenous circadian rhythm with suppression of the melatonin synthesis have been suggested mechanisms. We investigated the hypothesis that rotating night shift work is associated with mammographic density. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study on the association between rotating night shift work characteristics, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (MT6s) creatinine adjusted in a spot morning urine sample, and a computer-assisted measure of mammographic density in 640 nurses and midwives ages 40 to 60 years. The associations were evaluated using regression models adjusted for age, body mass index, menopausal status, age at menopause, age at menarche, smoking, and the calendar season of the year when mammography was conducted. RESULTS: The adjusted means of percentage of mammographic density and absolute density were slightly higher among women working rotating night shifts but not statistically significant [percentage of mammographic density = 23.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 21.9%-25.4% vs. 22.5%, 95% CI, 20.8%-24.3%; absolute density = 23.9 cm(2), 95% CI, 21.4-26.4 cm(2) vs. 21.8 cm(2), 95% CI, 19.4-24.3 cm(2) in rotating night shift and day shift nurses, respectively). There were no significant associations between the current or cumulative rotating night shift work exposure metrics and mammographic density. No association was observed between morning MT6s and mammographic density. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis on the link between rotating night shift work, melatonin synthesis disruption, and mammographic density is not supported by the results of the present study. IMPACT: It is unlikely that the development of breast cancer in nurses working rotating night shifts is mediated by an increase in mammographic density.
Address Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland. beatap@imp.lodz.pl
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Notes PMID:22539602 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 159
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Author (up) Sigurdardottir, L.G.; Valdimarsdottir, U.A.; Fall, K.; Rider, J.R.; Lockley, S.W.; Schernhammer, E.; Mucci, L.A.
Title Circadian disruption, sleep loss, and prostate cancer risk: a systematic review of epidemiologic studies Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume 21 Issue 7 Pages 1002-1011
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Humans; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology/*etiology; Risk Factors; *Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Disruption of the circadian system has been hypothesized to increase cancer risk, either because of direct disruption of the molecular machinery generating circadian rhythms or because of disruption of parameters controlled by the clock such as melatonin levels or sleep duration. This hypothesis has been studied in hormone-dependent cancers among women, but data are sparse about potential effects of circadian disruption on the risk of prostate cancer. This review systematically examines available data evaluating the effects of light at night, sleep patterns, and night shift work on prostate cancer risk.
Address Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. lara@sessionimpossible.com
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ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:22564869; PMCID:PMC3392423 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 516
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