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Author (up) Verma, A.K.; Singh, S.; Rizvi, S.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Age-dependent altered redox homeostasis in the chronodisrupted rat model and moderation by melatonin administration Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Aging; artificial light-at-night; circadian disruption; melatonin; oxidative stress  
  Abstract Circadian disruption or chronodisruption (CD) occurs when day-night cycles and other internal rhythms are not adjusted to environmental light-dark regimens and are unable to synchronize among each other. Artificial light-induced oxidative stress is a major concern as the circadian physiology of the cell is chronically altered due to suppression of the time-keeping hormone, melatonin. The relationship between age-related impaired redox status and disrupted circadian rhythms is still not fully understood. The present study evaluated the effect of artificial light at night (ALAN) with respect to aging and role of melatonin supplementation. This study was conducted on young (3 months) and old (24 months) male Wistar rats subdivided into four groups control (C), melatonin treated (MLT), artificial light at night (ALAN), and ALAN+MLT group. Pronounced changes were observed in the old compared to the young rats. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma membrane redox system (PMRS), protein carbonyl (PCO), and sialic acid (SA) were significantly (p </= 0.05) increased, while ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were significantly (p </= 0.05) suppressed in light-exposed young and old animals compared to their age-matched controls. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) increased non-significantly in young rats of the ALAN group; however, significant (p </= 0.05) changes were observed in the old rats of the ALAN group compared to their respective controls. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increased and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity decreased, significantly (p </= 0.05) in young animals of the ALAN group, while nonsignificant changes of both parameters were recorded in the old animals of the ALAN groups compared with their age-matched controls. Melatonin supplementation resulted in maintenance of the normal redox homeostasis in both young and old animal groups. Our study suggests that aged rats are more susceptible to altered photoperiod as their circadian redox homeostasis is under stress subsequent to ALAN. Melatonin supplementation could be a promising means of alleviating age-related circadian disturbances, especially in light-polluted areas.  
  Address Department of Biochemistry, University of Allahabad , Allahabad, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32731777 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3067  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Vollmer, C.; Michel, U.; Randler, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night (LAN) is correlated with eveningness in adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 502-508  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Adolescent Behavior/drug effects; Biological Clocks; Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage; *Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Computers; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Germany; Humans; *Light; Lighting; Male; *Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Questionnaires; *Sleep/drug effects; Television; Time Factors; Video Games; *Wakefulness/drug effects  
  Abstract External zeitgebers synchronize the human circadian rhythm of sleep and wakefulness. Humans adapt their chronotype to the day-night cycle, the strongest external zeitgeber. The human circadian rhythm shifts to evening-type orientation when daylight is prolonged into the evening and night hours by artificial light sources. Data from a survey of 1507 German adolescents covering questions about chronotype and electronic screen media use combined with nocturnal satellite image data suggest a relationship between chronotype and artificial nocturnal light. Adolescents living in brightly illuminated urban districts had a stronger evening-type orientation than adolescents living in darker and more rural municipalities. This result persisted when controlling for time use of electronic screen media, intake of stimulants, type of school, age, puberty status, time of sunrise, sex, and population density. Time spent on electronic screen media use-a source of indoor light at night-is also correlated with eveningness, as well as intake of stimulants, age, and puberty status, and, to a lesser degree, type of school and time of sunrise. Adequate urban development design and parents limiting adolescents' electronic screen media use in the evening could help to adjust adolescents' zeitgeber to early school schedules when they provide appropriate lighting conditions for daytime and for nighttime.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22214237 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 150  
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Author (up) Vollmer, C.; Randler, C.; Di Milia, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Further evidence for the influence of photoperiod at birth on chronotype in a sample of German adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 10 Pages 1345-1351  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Child; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Germany; Humans; Male; Parturition/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Puberty/physiology; *Seasons; Sleep/*physiology  
  Abstract Individuals differ in their circadian preferences (chronotype). There is evidence in the literature to support a season-of-birth effect on chronotype but the evidence is not convincing. In part, the relationship is obscured by a number of methodological differences between studies, including the measures used to define morningness, the way in which the seasons were categorized, and the sample size. This study adds to the literature in several ways. First, we adopt a new approach to categorizing the photoperiod rather than the calendar season; thus we prefer to use the term photoperiod at birth. Second, we used two measures of morningness. Third, we used a large and homogeneous German sample. The results show that adolescents (n = 2905) born during the increasing photoperiod (Feb-Apr) had a significantly later midpoint of sleep (MSFsc) than those born during the decreasing photoperiod (Aug-Oct). A similar pattern was found for the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM). Furthermore, both measures of chronotype demonstrated a significant quadratic function over a 1-yr cycle. When looking at each of six consecutive years separately, the Composite Scale of Morningness suggests a cosine rhythm linked to increasing and decreasing photoperiods that becomes weaker in amplitude with increasing age. Despite the strengths in our study, the effect of photoperiod at birth on chronotype remains small. Future studies may require larger sample sizes, may need to explore how neonatal light exposure modulates chronotype, and may need to track how puberty and adolescent lifestyle habits mask the photoperiod effect.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 561-2, Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23130997 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 517  
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Author (up) Wieduwilt, A.; Alsat, E.A.; Blickwedel, J.; Strizek, B.; Di Battista, C.; Lachner, A.B.; Plischke, H.; Melaku, T.; Muller, A.; Bagci, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dramatically altered environmental lighting conditions in women with high-risk pregnancy during hospitalization Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Pregnant women; circadian rhythm; color temperatures; hospital light environmental; illuminance; indoor  
  Abstract The maternal circadian time structure is incredibly important in the entrainment and programing of the fetal and newborn circadian time structure. Natural sunlight is the primary environmental time cue for entrainment of circadian rhythms, but high-risk pregnant women spend most of their time indoors with artificial light sources and extremely low levels of natural light both during the day and night. Because the daily level, timing, duration of light exposure and its spectral properties are important in maintaining the normal circadian physiology in humans, we aimed to evaluate the environmental lighting conditions in high-risk pregnant women admitted to hospital for long-term stay. About 30 patients were included in the study. Exposed illuminance, color temperature and effective circadian radiation dose were measured and recorded every 10 s by light dosimeters attached to the patients' clothing. We documented the illuminance of 29 pregnant women on 235 inpatient days. Median (IQR) measured illuminance was 70 (28-173) lux in the morning, 124 (63-241) lux in the afternoon, 19 (6-53) lux in the evening and 0 (0-0) lux at the night. Median illuminance for the 235 inpatient days of assessment was below the recommended EU standard of 100 lux-60.5% of the mornings and 42.7% of the afternoons. The women confined to indoor locations rarely achieved an illuminances more than 300 lux in the morning and in the afternoon. Compared to women with outdoor mobility, those confined indoors have a significantly lower illuminance and color temperature, both in the morning and in the afternoon. Our study presents the first information about the dramatically altered environmental lighting conditions experienced by high-risk pregnant women during their hospital stay. Their exposure to light while in the hospital is significantly lower than exposure to natural daylight levels and below the recommended EU standard.  
  Address Department of Neonatology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, Children's Hospital, University of Bonn , Bonn, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32752886 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3061  
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