toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Casasole, G.; Raap, T.; Costantini, D.; AbdElgawad, H.; Asard, H.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Neither artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise nor distance from roads are associated with oxidative status of nestlings in an urban population of songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 210 Issue Pages 14-21  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Increasing urbanization is responsible for road-related pollutants and causes an unprecedented increase in light and noise pollution, with potential detrimental effects for individual animals, communities and ecosystems. These stressors rarely act in isolation but studies dissecting the effects of these multiple stressors are lacking. Moreover, studies on urban stressors have mainly focused on adults, while exposure in early-life may be detrimental but is largely ignored. To fill this important knowledge gap, we studied if artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise and road-related pollution (using distance from roads as a proxy) explain variation in oxidative status in great tit nestlings (Parus major) in an urban population. Artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise and distance from roads were not associated with variation of the nine studied metrics of oxidative status (superoxide dismutase-SOD-, glutathione peroxidase-GPX, catalase-CAT-, non-enzymatic total antioxidant capacity-TAC-, reduced glutathione-GSH-, oxidized glutathione-GSSG-, ratio GSH/GSSG, protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances-TBARS). Interestingly, for all oxidative status metrics, we found that there was more variation in oxidative status among individuals of the same nest compared to between different nests. We also showed an increase in protein carbonyls and a decrease of the ratio GSH/GSSG as the day advanced, and an increase of GPX when weather conditions deteriorated. Our study suggests that anthropogenic noise, artificial light at night and road-related pollution are not the most important sources of variation in oxidative status in great tit nestlings. It also highlights the importance of considering bleeding time and weather conditions in studies with free-living animals.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology & Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28499963 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2457  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Hines, C.W.; Fang, Y.; Chan, V.K.S.; Stiller, K.T.; Brauner, C.J.; Richards, J.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of salinity and photoperiod on thermal tolerance of Atlantic and coho salmon reared from smolt to adult in recirculating aquaculture systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 230 Issue Pages 1-6  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Land-based, closed containment salmon aquaculture involves rearing salmon from smolt to adult in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). Unlike in open-net pen aquaculture, rearing conditions can be specified in RAS in order to optimize growth and physiological stress tolerance. The environmental conditions that yield optimal stress tolerance in salmon are, however, unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we reared Atlantic (Salmo salar) and coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) salmon in 7 separate RASs for 400days post-smoltification under 2 photoperiods (24:0 or 12:12, light:dark) and 4 salinities (2.5, 5, 10 or 30ppt.) and assessed the effects of these conditions on thermal tolerance. We found that over the first 120days post-smoltification, rearing coho under a 24:0 photoperiod resulted in a ~2 degrees C lower critical thermal maxima (CTmax) than in coho reared under a 12:12 photoperiod. This photoperiod effect did not persist at 200 and 400days, which was coincident with an overall decrease in CTmax in coho. Finally, Atlantic salmon had a higher CTmax (~28 degrees C) compared to coho (~26 degrees C) at 400days post-smoltification. Overall, these findings are important for the future implications of RAS and for the aquaculture industry to help identify physiologically sensitive time stages.  
  Address Department of Zoology, The University of British Columbia, 6270 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30590111 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2149  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liu, Q.; Manning, A.J.; Duston, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light intensity and suppression of nocturnal plasma melatonin in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The problem of early sexual maturation among farmed Arctic charr and other salmonids can be effectively reduced by 24h light overwinter, provided it is bright enough to over-ride interference from the natural daylength cycle. To determine the threshold light intensity to suppress the nocturnal elevation of plasma melatonin, three groups of individually tagged fish (n=26-28/group ca. 1040g) were reared on 12h light: 12h dark (LD 12:12) and subjected to nighttime light intensities of either 50-65, 0.1-0.3 or 0 (control) lux for five months (November to April). Daytime light intensity was 720-750lx. Diel plasma melatonin profiles in both November and April were similar; mean daytime levels ranged from 20 to 100pg/ml, and nighttime levels were inversely proportional to light intensity. In the control group at 0lx, plasma melatonin increased about four-fold after lights-off, ranging between 320 and 430pg/ml. Nighttime light intensity of 0.1-0.3lx halved plasma melatonin levels to 140-220pg/ml, and 50-65lx further reduced the levels to one quarter of the control group, 68-108pg/ml. Among the lit groups, daytime plasma melatonin levels were about 20-30pg/ml, significantly lower than the nocturnal levels suggesting the diel hormonal rhythm was not completely abolished. Fish grew steadily from about 1100g to 1600g between November and April, independent of light intensity (P=.67). Overall, the study demonstrated the sensitivity of pineal melatonin hormone to different light intensities in Arctic charr.  
  Address Department of Animal Science and Aquaculture, Dalhousie University, Agricultural Campus, Truro, NS B2N 5E3, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30471350 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2111  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Saini, C.; Hutton, P.; Gao, S.; Simpson, R.K.; Giraudeau, M.; Sepp, T.; Webb, E.; McGraw, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to artificial light at night increases innate immune activity during development in a precocial bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 233 Issue Pages 84-88  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; king quail; Excalfactoria chinensis; immunity  
  Abstract Humans have greatly altered Earth's night-time photic environment via the production of artificial light at night (ALAN; e.g. street lights, car traffic, billboards, lit buildings). ALAN is a problem of growing importance because it may significantly disrupt the seasonal and daily physiological rhythms and behaviors of animals. There has been considerable interest in the impacts of ALAN on health of humans and other animals, but most of this work has centered on adults and we know comparatively little about effects on young animals. We exposed 3-week-old king quail (Excalfactoria chinensis) to a constant overnight blue-light regime for 6 weeks and assessed weekly bactericidal activity of plasma against Escherichia coli – a commonly employed metric of innate immunity in animals. We found that chronic ALAN exposure significantly increased bactericidal activity and that this elevation in immune performance manifested at different developmental time points in males and females. Whether this short-term increase in immune activity can be extended to wild animals, and whether ALAN-mediated increases in immune activity have positive or negative fitness effects are unknown and will provide interesting avenues for future studies.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, United States of America. Electronic address: Kevin.McGraw@asu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30974186 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2291  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: