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Author (up) Kosicki, J.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anthropogenic activity expressed as ‘artificial light at night’ improves predictive density distribution in bird populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Ecological Complexity Abbreviated Journal Ecological Complexity  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 100809  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is one of the most important anthropogenic environmental components that affects biodiversity worldwide. Despite extensive knowledge on ALAN, being a measure of human activity that directly impacts numerous aspects of animal behaviour, such as orientation and distribution, little is known about its effects on density distribution on a large spatial scale. That is why we decided to explore by means of the Species Distribution Modelling approach (SDM) how ALAN as one of 33 predictors determines farmland and forest bird species densities. In order to safeguard study results from any inconsistency caused by the chosen method, we used two approaches, i.e. the Generalised Additive Model (GAM) and the Random Forest (RF). Within each approach, we developed two models for two bird species, the Black woodpecker and the European stonechat: the first with ALAN, and the second without ALAN as an additional predictor. Having used out-of-bag procedures in the RF approach, information-theoretic criteria for the GAM, and evaluation models based on an independent dataset, we demonstrated that models with ALAN had higher predictive density power than models without it. The Black woodpecker definitely and linearly avoids anthropogenic activity, defined by the level of artificial light, while the European stonechat tolerates human activity to some degree, especially in farmland habitats. What is more, a heuristic analysis of predictive maps based on models without ALAN shows that both species reach high densities in regions where they are deemed rare. Hence, the study proves that urbanisation processes, which can be reflected by ALAN, are among key predictors necessary for developing Species Density Distribution Models for both farmland and forest bird species.  
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  ISSN 1476945X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2776  
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Author (up) Marcantonio, M.; Pareeth, S.; Rocchini, D.; Metz, M.; Garzon-Lopez, C.X.; Neteler, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The integration of Artificial Night-Time Lights in landscape ecology: A remote sensing approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Ecological Complexity Abbreviated Journal Ecological Complexity  
  Volume 22 Issue Pages 109-120  
  Keywords Ecology; Conservation  
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  ISSN 1476945X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1146  
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Author (up) You, H.; Jin, C.; Sun, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatiotemporal Evolution of Population in Northeast China during 2012–2017: A Nighttime Light Approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Complexity Abbreviated Journal Complexity  
  Volume 2020 Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Population is one of the key problematic factors that are restricting China’s economic and social development. Previous studies have used nighttime light (NTL) imagery to calculate population density. This study analyzes the spatiotemporal evolution of the population in Northeast China based on linear regression analyses of NPP-VIIRS NTL imagery and statistical population data from 36 cities in Northeast China from 2012 to 2017. Based on a comparison of the estimation results in different years, we observed the following. (1) The population of Northeast China showed an overall decreasing trend from 2012–2017, with population changes of +31,600, −960,800, −359,800, −188,000, and −1,127,600 in the respective years. (2) With the overall population loss trend in Northeast China, the population increased in only three cities, namely, Shenyang, Dalian, and Panjin, with an average increase during the six-year period of 24,200, 6,500, and 2,000 people, respectively. (3) The four major urban agglomerations in Northeast China (the Harbin-Daqing-Qiqihar Industrial Corridor, Changjitu Pilot Zone, Liaoning Coastal Economic Belt, and Shenyang Economic Zone) have annual populations far exceeding 4 million people. A correct appreciation of the population dynamics is vital to resource management and comprehensive management efforts. Making full use of natural resources and regional advantages could effectively improve and potentially solve the urban population loss problem and would be of great innovative significance for supporting the realization of the Millennium Development Goals.  
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  ISSN 1076-2787 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2981  
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