|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) Alldredge, A.L.; King, J.M.
Title Effects of moonlight on the vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton Type Journal Article
Year 1980 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 133-156
Keywords Animals
Abstract The diel vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton, those organisms which habit bottom substrates but periodically emerge to swim freely in the water column, water determined throughout the lunar cycle. Demersal zooplankton were quantitatively sampled on a subtidal sand flat in the Gulf of California every 2 h for 24-h periods at new, full, first, and last-quarter moons, both as they emerged into the water column and as they returned to the benthos. Demersal zooplankton rarely migrated during daylight. Three general patterns of migration were observed. (1) Polychaetes and cumaceans emerged from the benthos at dusk, regardless of the phase of the moon. Polychaetes returned to the benthos throughout the night while cumaceans returned near dawn. (2) Species of amphipods and isopods exhibited significant avoidance of moonlight, delaying emergence until moonset or returning to the benthos at moonrise. (3) Species of copepods, mysids, shrimp, Branchiostoma (cephalochordate), and tanaids emerged into the water column throughout the night. The timing of migration was highly variable and did not correlate with the presence or absence of moonlight. Large zooplankton migrated less frequently into the water column during moonlit periods than small forms, suggesting that nocturnal predation by visually oriented planktivorous fish may be an important selective pressure.

Demersal zooplankton emerged into artificially darkened emergence traps in significantly higher numbers during daylight and during full and quarter moons than into undarkened control traps, demonstrating that absence of light is a major cue stimulating migration. Reentry traps resting on the bottom captured higher densities of demersal zooplankton than either emergence traps or reentry traps suspended off the bottom. Thus, many demersal zooplankton remain near the bottom, rarely swimming far into the water column. Some trap avoidance was observed and current methods for collecting demersal zooplankton are evaluated. Since most demersal zooplankton remained in the water column only a short time, dispersal, particularly over short distances, may be a major advantage of migratory behavior. Migration facilitates rapid recolonization of disturbed or defaunated sites, disrupts and mixes bottom sediments, and results in daily variation in the microdistribution, patchiness, and species composition of the benthic fauna.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 423
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Craig, C.L.
Title Insect Perception of Spider Orb Webs in Three Light Habitats Type Journal Article
Year 1988 Publication Functional Ecology Abbreviated Journal Functional Ecology
Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 277
Keywords Animals
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 665
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cruz, L.M.; Shillinger, G.L.; Robinson, N.J.; Tomillo, P.S.; Paladino, F.V.
Title Effect of light intensity and wavelength on the in-water orientation of olive ridley turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 505 Issue Pages 52-56
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution, associated with coastal development, poses a growing threat to sea turtles. Hatchlings are particularly affected during their crawl to the ocean since they exhibit phototaxis and may move towards or be disoriented by artificial lights. Although much is known about how hatchlings respond to artificial light while crawling to the ocean, far less is known about their response after reaching the water. Here, we investigate how hatchling olive ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) held in artificial pools responded to light of different wavelengths (red, 720 nm; yellow, 660 nm and green, 520 nm) and intensities (0.1–3.3 lx, mean 0.87 lx, SD = 0.85, 10.3–45.9 lx, mean 15.75 lx,SD = 7.12; 47.5–84.2 lx; mean 52.02 lx, SD = 9.11; 91.3–140.8 lx, mean 105 lx, SD = 13.24; 150.1–623 lx, mean 172.18 lx, SD = 73.42). When no light or red light below 39 lx was present, hatchlings oriented at a mean angle of 180° from true north and did not orient towards any discernable feature. However, hatchlings swam towards the light at intensities of red light above 39 lx, yellow light above 10 lx and green light above 5 lx. Our findings indicate that sea turtles will swim towards artificial lights even after reaching the water. Thus, we recommend light mitigation efforts should extend beyond nesting beaches and into the associated oceanic habitats.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1894
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Davies, T.W.; Duffy, J.P.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title The nature, extent, and ecological implications of marine light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 347-355
Keywords Ecology; light pollution; oceans; marine; ecology; ecosystem; Review
Abstract Despite centuries of use, artificial light at night has only recently been recognized as a cause for environmental concern. Its global extent and ongoing encroachment into naturally lit ecosystems has sparked scientific interest into the many ways in which it may negatively affect human health, societal attitudes, scientific endeavors, and biological processes. Yet, perhaps because sources of artificial light are largely land based, the potential for artificial light pollution to interfere with the biology of the ocean has not been explored in any detail. There is little information on how light pollution affects those species, behaviors, and interactions that are informed by the intensity, spectra, and periodicity of natural nighttime light in marine ecosystems. Here, we provide an overview of the extent of marine light pollution, discuss how it changes the physical environment, and explore its potential role in shaping marine ecosystems.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Cornwall, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 365
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Firebaugh, A.; Haynes, K.J.
Title Light pollution may create demographic traps for nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology
Volume 34 Issue Pages 118-125
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution impacts both intra- and inter-specific interactions, such as interactions between mates and predator–prey interactions. In mobile organisms attracted to artificial lights, the effect of light pollution on these interactions may be intensified. If organisms are repelled by artificial lights, effects of light pollution on intra- and inter-specific interactions may be diminished as organisms move away. However, organisms repelled by artificial lights would likely lose suitable habitat as light pollution expands. Thus, we investigated how light pollution affects both net attraction or repulsion of organisms and effects on intra- and inter-specific interactions. In manipulative field studies using fireflies, we found that Photuris versicolor and Photinus pyralis fireflies were lured to artificial (LED) light at night and that both species were less likely to engage in courtship dialogues (bioluminescent flashing) in light-polluted field plots. Light pollution also lowered the mating success of P. pyralis. P. versicolor is known to prey upon P. pyralis by mimicking the flash patterns of P. pyralis, but we did not find an effect of light pollution on Photuris–Photinus predator–prey interactions. Our study suggests, that for some nocturnal insects, light-polluted areas may act as demographic traps, i.e., areas where immigration exceeds emigration and inhibition of courtship dialogues and mating reduces reproduction. Examining multiple factors affecting population growth in concert is needed to understand and mitigate impacts of light pollution on wildlife.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1978
Permanent link to this record