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Author Verutes, G.M.; Huang, C.; Estrella, R.R.; Loyd, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exploring scenarios of light pollution from coastal development reaching sea turtle nesting beaches near Cabo Pulmo, Mexico Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Global Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Global Ecology and Conservation  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages (down) 170-180  
  Keywords Artificial light; Viewshed analysis; Sea turtle conservation; Coastal resort management; InVEST; sea turtle; reptiles; marine reptiles; vertebrates; Mexico; Baja California  
  Abstract New coastal development may offer economic benefits to resort builders and even local communities, but these projects can also impact local ecosystems, key wildlife, and the draw for tourists. We explore how light from Cabo Cortés, a proposed coastal development in Baja California Sur, Mexico, may alter natural light cues used by sea turtle hatchlings. We adapt a viewshed approach to model exterior light originating from the resort under plausible zoning scenarios. This spatially explicit information allows stakeholders to evaluate the likely impact of alternative development options. Our model suggests that direct light’s ability to reach sea turtle nesting beaches varies greatly by source location and height—with some plausible development scenarios leading to significantly less light pollution than others. Our light pollution maps can enhance decision-making, offering clear guidance on where to avoid elevated lamps or when to recommend lighting restrictions. Communities can use this information to participate in development planning to mitigate ecological, aesthetic and economic impacts from artificial lighting. Though tested in Mexico, our approach and free, open-source software can be applied in other places around the world to better understand and manage the threats of light pollution to sea turtles.  
  Address Natural Capital Project, Stanford University, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA  
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  ISSN 2351-9894 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 368  
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Author Alldredge, A.L.; King, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of moonlight on the vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton Type Journal Article
  Year 1980 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages (down) 133-156  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The diel vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton, those organisms which habit bottom substrates but periodically emerge to swim freely in the water column, water determined throughout the lunar cycle. Demersal zooplankton were quantitatively sampled on a subtidal sand flat in the Gulf of California every 2 h for 24-h periods at new, full, first, and last-quarter moons, both as they emerged into the water column and as they returned to the benthos. Demersal zooplankton rarely migrated during daylight. Three general patterns of migration were observed. (1) Polychaetes and cumaceans emerged from the benthos at dusk, regardless of the phase of the moon. Polychaetes returned to the benthos throughout the night while cumaceans returned near dawn. (2) Species of amphipods and isopods exhibited significant avoidance of moonlight, delaying emergence until moonset or returning to the benthos at moonrise. (3) Species of copepods, mysids, shrimp, Branchiostoma (cephalochordate), and tanaids emerged into the water column throughout the night. The timing of migration was highly variable and did not correlate with the presence or absence of moonlight. Large zooplankton migrated less frequently into the water column during moonlit periods than small forms, suggesting that nocturnal predation by visually oriented planktivorous fish may be an important selective pressure.

Demersal zooplankton emerged into artificially darkened emergence traps in significantly higher numbers during daylight and during full and quarter moons than into undarkened control traps, demonstrating that absence of light is a major cue stimulating migration. Reentry traps resting on the bottom captured higher densities of demersal zooplankton than either emergence traps or reentry traps suspended off the bottom. Thus, many demersal zooplankton remain near the bottom, rarely swimming far into the water column. Some trap avoidance was observed and current methods for collecting demersal zooplankton are evaluated. Since most demersal zooplankton remained in the water column only a short time, dispersal, particularly over short distances, may be a major advantage of migratory behavior. Migration facilitates rapid recolonization of disturbed or defaunated sites, disrupts and mixes bottom sediments, and results in daily variation in the microdistribution, patchiness, and species composition of the benthic fauna.
 
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  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 423  
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Author Firebaugh, A.; Haynes, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution may create demographic traps for nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages (down) 118-125  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution impacts both intra- and inter-specific interactions, such as interactions between mates and predator–prey interactions. In mobile organisms attracted to artificial lights, the effect of light pollution on these interactions may be intensified. If organisms are repelled by artificial lights, effects of light pollution on intra- and inter-specific interactions may be diminished as organisms move away. However, organisms repelled by artificial lights would likely lose suitable habitat as light pollution expands. Thus, we investigated how light pollution affects both net attraction or repulsion of organisms and effects on intra- and inter-specific interactions. In manipulative field studies using fireflies, we found that Photuris versicolor and Photinus pyralis fireflies were lured to artificial (LED) light at night and that both species were less likely to engage in courtship dialogues (bioluminescent flashing) in light-polluted field plots. Light pollution also lowered the mating success of P. pyralis. P. versicolor is known to prey upon P. pyralis by mimicking the flash patterns of P. pyralis, but we did not find an effect of light pollution on Photuris–Photinus predator–prey interactions. Our study suggests, that for some nocturnal insects, light-polluted areas may act as demographic traps, i.e., areas where immigration exceeds emigration and inhibition of courtship dialogues and mating reduces reproduction. Examining multiple factors affecting population growth in concert is needed to understand and mitigate impacts of light pollution on wildlife.  
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  ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1978  
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Author Kelber, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light intensity limits foraging activity in nocturnal and crepuscular bees Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages (down) 63-72  
  Keywords bees; eyes; foraging; insects; ocelli; sensitivity; visual ecology  
  Abstract A crepuscular or nocturnal lifestyle has evolved in bees several times independently, probably to explore rewarding pollen sources without competition and to minimize predation and nest parasites. Despite these obvious advantages, only few bee species are nocturnal. Here we show that the sensitivity of the bee apposition eye is a major factor limiting the ability to forage in dim light. We present data on eye size, foraging times, and light levels for Megalopta genalis (Augochlorini, Halictidae) in Panama, and Lasioglossum (Sphecodogastra) sp. (Halictini, Halictidae) in Utah, USA. M. genalis females forage exclusively during twilight, but as a result of dim light levels in the rain forest, they are adapted to extremely low intensities. The likely factor limiting their foraging activity is finding their nest entrance on return from a foraging trip. The lowest light intensity at which they can do this, both in the morning and the evening, is 0.0001 cd m−2. Therefore, they leave the nest at dimmer light levels in the morning than in the evening. Lasioglossum (Sphecodogastra) foraging is limited by light intensity in the evening, but probably by temperature in the morning in the temperate climate of Utah. We propose that the evolution of nocturnality in bees was favored by the large variance in the size of females.  
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  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 119  
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Author Grant, R.; Halliday, T.; Chadwick, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Amphibians' response to the lunar synodic cycle--a review of current knowledge, recommendations, and implications for conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages (down) 53-62  
  Keywords amphibians; circular statistics; light; lunar cycle; moon phase; predator avoidance; reproductive synchronization; moonlight  
  Abstract The way in which amphibians respond to the geophysical changes brought about by the lunar synodic cycle is a neglected area of their ecology, but one which has recently generated interest. Knowledge of how amphibians respond to lunar phase is of intrinsic interest and also may be important for conservation and monitoring of populations. We surveyed the literature on amphibians’ responses to the lunar cycle and found 79 examples where moon phase in relation to amphibian behavior and ecology had been studied, across diverse amphibian taxa. Of the examples reviewed, most of them show some type of response to lunar phase, with only a few species being unaffected. We found that there is no significant difference between the numbers of species which increase, and those that decrease activity or reproductive behavior (including calling) during a full moon. The responses to the lunar cycle can not be generalized across taxonomic group, but instead are highly species specific and relate directly to the species’ ecology. The primary reasons for changes in amphibian behavior in response to the lunar cycle appear to be temporal synchronization of breeding and predator avoidance. Responses to changes in prey availability, facilitation of visual signalling and use of lunar cues in navigation and homing are less prevalent but merit further investigation. Comparisons between studies are hampered by differences in field and analytical methods; we therefore make a number of recommendations for future collection and analysis of data related to lunar phase.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 81  
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