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Author Nankoo, S.; Raymond, S.; Galvez-Cloutier, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of the Jacques Cartier bridge illumination on the food chain: from insects to predators Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Community Ecology Abbreviated Journal Community Ecology  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 172-180  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night can impact numerous diurnal species by influencing their distribution and habits. In this study, artificial lights placed on the Jacques Cartier bridge in Montreal, Canada were evaluated to determine their impact on insects, insectivorous birds and peregrine falcons. The impact was measured the year the illumination begun and the year following (two years in total). Insect distribution and abundance at three different sites around the bridge was measured. Insectivorous bird abundance and activity were evaluated by observing the cliff swallow as a proxy. Peregrine falcon presence and nesting behavior at the bridge was measured. Insects (aerial and aquatic) were found to be more abundant closer to the illuminated part of the bridge and particularly in the year following the illumination's beginning. Similarly, cliff swallows were more abundant at the bridge the year following the start of the illumination and their activity was more important closer to the illuminated section. Peregrine falcons were only present at the bridge in the year following the beginning of the illumination and specifically at the illuminated part of the bridge. No nesting was detected. These three groups are connected to each other through a food chain in which insect abundance impacts insectivorous bird abundance, which in turn impacts peregrine falcon presence. The illumination therefore positively impacts these three groups separately and together through their food chain. This research highlights the importance of monitoring bird and insect population close to the bridge and further continuation of these observations are necessary to determine if the observed tendency will continue to develop throughout the years.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1585-8553 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2705  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Straka, T.M.; Greif, S.; Schultz, S.; Goerlitz, H.R.; Voigt, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of cave illumination on bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Global Ecology and Conservation  
  Volume 21 Issue Pages e00808  
  Keywords Animals; Lighting  
  Abstract Artificial light at night has large impacts on nocturnal wildlife such as bats, yet its effect varies with wavelength of light, context, and across species involved. Here, we studied in two experiments how wild bats of cave-roosting species (Rhinolophus mehelyi, R. euryale, Myotis capaccinii and Miniopterus schreibersii) respond to LED lights of different colours. In dual choice experiments, we measured the acoustic activity of bats in response to neutral-white, red or amber LED at a cave entrance and in a flight room – mimicking a cave interior. In the flight room, M. capaccinii and M. schreibersii preferred red to white light, but showed no preference for red over amber, or amber over white light. In the cave entrance experiment, all light colours reduced the activity of all emerging species, yet red LED had the least negative effect. Rhinolophus species reacted most strongly, matching their refusal to fly at all under any light treatment in the flight room. We conclude that the placement and light colour of LED light should be considered carefully in lighting concepts for caves both in the interior and at the entrance. In a cave interior, red LED light could be chosen – if needed at all – for careful temporary illumination of areas, yet areas important for bats should be avoided based on the precautionary principle. At cave entrances, the high sensitivity of most bat species, particularly of Rhinolophus spp., towards light sources almost irrespective of colour, calls for utmost caution when illuminating cave entrances.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2351-9894 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2700  
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Author Firebaugh, A.; Haynes, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution may create demographic traps for nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 118-125  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution impacts both intra- and inter-specific interactions, such as interactions between mates and predator–prey interactions. In mobile organisms attracted to artificial lights, the effect of light pollution on these interactions may be intensified. If organisms are repelled by artificial lights, effects of light pollution on intra- and inter-specific interactions may be diminished as organisms move away. However, organisms repelled by artificial lights would likely lose suitable habitat as light pollution expands. Thus, we investigated how light pollution affects both net attraction or repulsion of organisms and effects on intra- and inter-specific interactions. In manipulative field studies using fireflies, we found that Photuris versicolor and Photinus pyralis fireflies were lured to artificial (LED) light at night and that both species were less likely to engage in courtship dialogues (bioluminescent flashing) in light-polluted field plots. Light pollution also lowered the mating success of P. pyralis. P. versicolor is known to prey upon P. pyralis by mimicking the flash patterns of P. pyralis, but we did not find an effect of light pollution on Photuris–Photinus predator–prey interactions. Our study suggests, that for some nocturnal insects, light-polluted areas may act as demographic traps, i.e., areas where immigration exceeds emigration and inhibition of courtship dialogues and mating reduces reproduction. Examining multiple factors affecting population growth in concert is needed to understand and mitigate impacts of light pollution on wildlife.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1978  
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Author Henn, M.; Nichols, H.; Zhang, Y.; Bonner, T.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of artificial light on the drift of aquatic insects in urban central Texas streams Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Freshwater Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Freshwater Ecology  
  Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 307-318  
  Keywords light pollution; stream ecology; urban ecology; drift; abiotic factors; Baetidae; Chironomidae; insects; Texas; Simuliidae; Edwards Plateau; light at night; ecology  
  Abstract Light pollution can reduce night time drift of larval aquatic insects in urban streams by disrupting their circadian rhythms. Previous studies on larval insect drift show that disruption in drift leads to changes in reproduction as well as intraspecific and interspecific interactions. The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary investigation into the effects of extreme artificial light on insect drift in urbanized, high clarity spring systems of the karst Edwards Plateau, TX. We quantified taxa richness, diversity, and abundance in aquatic insect night time drift under two treatments (ambient night time light and artificial light addition) and among five streams using a paired design. Richness and diversity of drifting aquatic insects were similar between treatments but abundance was 37% less in the light addition treatment than that of the control. Effects of light addition on mean abundance was more notable in large streams with a 58% decrease in Simuliidae (compared to that of the control) and 51% decrease in Baetidae. Reduced drift from light addition suggests the potential of artificial lighting disrupting insect drift and consequently community structure. Results of this experiment support a growing body of knowledge on how urbanized systems influence stream communities.  
  Address Department of Biology/Aquatic Station, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0270-5060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 312  
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Author Viera-Perez, M.; Hernandez-Calvento, L.; Hesp, P.A.; Santana-Del Pino, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial light on flowering of foredune vegetation Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology  
  Volume 100 Issue 5 Pages e02678  
  Keywords Plants; Coastal management; coastal dunes; Canary Islands; Spain; Europe  
  Abstract The impact of ecological light pollution involves alteration of periods of natural light, a fact that has proven effects on ecosystems. Few studies have focused on the impact of this pollution on wild plant species, and none on coastal dune plants. Many coastal dunes and their plants are adjacent to tourist areas, and these might be affected by light pollution. Such is the case of the Natural Reserve Dunas de Maspalomas (Gran Canaria), where some individuals of the plant species Traganum moquinii, located in the El Ingles beach foredune zone, are affected by light pollution. This study examines the effect of light pollution on the flowering process, and by extension the reproductive cycle of these plants. Plants located closer to high artificial illumination sources receive ~2120 hours per year of intense light more than plants located furthest from those artificial lighting sources. Parts of the plants of Traganum moquinii exposed directly to the artificial light show a significant decrease in the production of flowers, compared to the parts in plants in shade, and to the plants more distant from artificial lights. In consequence, plants exposed more directly to artificial light have a lower potential for seed reproduction. The spectrum of artificial light also affects the plants, and light between 600 and 700 nm primarily affects the reproductive cycle of the Traganum moquinii species. The implications for the ecological and geomorphological functioning of the dune system are discussed, because this species plays a decisive role in the formation of foredune zones and nebkhas in arid dune systems.  
  Address Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Ecological Society of America Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30825328 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2244  
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