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Author (up) Degen, T.; Hovestadt, T.; Mitesser, O.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Altered sex-specific mortality and female mating success: ecological effects and evolutionary responses Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages e01820  
  Keywords Insects; nocturnal insects; mating behaviour  
  Abstract Theory predicts that males and females should often join the mating pool at different times (sexual dimorphism in timing of emergence [SDT]) as the degree of SDT affects female mating success. We utilize an analytical model to explore (1) how important SDT is for female mating success, (2) how mating success might change if either sex's mortality (abruptly) increases, and (3) to what degree evolutionary responses in SDT may be able to mitigate the consequences of such mortality increase. Increasing male pre-mating mortality has a non-linear effect on the fraction of females mated: The effect is initially weak, but at some critical level a further increase in male mortality has a stronger effect than a similar increase in female mortality. Such a change is expected to impose selection for reduced SDT. Increasing mortality during the mating season has always a stronger effect on female mating success if the mortality affects the sex that emerges first. This bias results from the fact that enhancing mortality of the earlier emerging sex reduces femaleâ??male encounter rates. However, an evolutionary response in SDT may effectively mitigate such consequences. Further , if considered independently for females and males, the predicted evolutionary response in SDT could be quite dissimilar. The difference between female and male evolutionary response in SDT leads to marked differences in the fraction of fertilized females under certain conditions. Our model may provide general guidelines for improving harvesting of populations, conservation management of rare species under altered environmental conditions, or maintaining long-term efficiency of pest-control measures.  
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  ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1663  
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Author (up) Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of street lighting technologies on the success and quality of pollination in a nocturnally pollinated plant Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages e02550  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly important driver of global change. Lighting directly affects plants, but few studies have investigated indirect effects mediated by interacting organisms. Nocturnal Lepidoptera are globally important pollinators, and pollen transport by moths is disrupted by lighting. Many street lighting systems are being replaced with novel, energy‐efficient lighting, with unknown ecological consequences. Using the wildflower Silene latifolia, we compared pollination success and quality at experimentally lit and unlit plots, testing two major changes to street lighting technology: in lamp type, from high‐pressure sodium lamps to light‐emitting diodes, and in lighting regime, from full‐night (FN) to part‐night (PN) lighting. We predicted that lighting would reduce pollination. S. latifolia was pollinated both diurnally and nocturnally. Contrary to our predictions, flowers under FN lighting had higher pollination success than flowers under either PN lighting or unlit controls, which did not significantly differ from each other. Lamp type, lighting regime, and distance from the light all significantly affected aspects of pollination quality. These results confirm that street lighting could affect plant reproduction through indirect effects mediated by nocturnal insects, and further highlight the possibility for novel lighting technologies to mitigate the effects of ALAN on ecosystems.  
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  ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2174  
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Author (up) Perkin, E.K.; Hölker, F.; Richardson, J.S.; Sadler, J.P.; Wolter, C.; Tockner, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of artificial light on stream and riparian ecosystems: questions, challenges, and perspectives Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere  
  Volume 2 Issue 11 Pages art122  
  Keywords aquatic invertebrates; artificial illumination; ecosystems; fish; multiple stressors; riparian; streams; urbanization  
  Abstract Artificial light at night is gaining attention for its potential to alter ecosystems. Although terrestrial ecologists have observed that artificial light at night may disrupt migrations, feeding, and other important ecological functions, we know comparatively little about the role artificial light might play in disrupting freshwater and riparian ecosystems. We identify and discuss four future research domains that artificial light may influence in freshwater and associated terrestrial ecosystems, with an emphasis on running waters: (1) dispersal, (2) population genetics and evolution, (3) ecosystem functioning, and (4) potential interactions with other stressors. We suggest that future experimental and modeling studies should focus on the effects of different spectral emissions by different light sources on freshwater organisms, the spatial and temporal scale over which artificial light acts, and the magnitude of change in light at night across the landscape relative to the distribution of running and standing waters. Improved knowledge about the effects of artificial light on freshwater ecosystems will inform policy decisions about changes to artificial light spectral emissions and distributions.

Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/ES11-00241.1
 
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  ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 24  
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Author (up) Troy, J.R.; Holmes, N.D.; Green, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modeling artificial light viewed by fledgling seabirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere  
  Volume 2 Issue 10 Pages art109  
  Keywords artificial light; fallout; Hydrobatidae; modeling; Newell's Shearwater; Procellariidae; Puffinus newelli; birds  
  Abstract Artificial light is increasing in coverage across the surface of our planet, impacting the behavioral ecology of many organisms. Attraction to sources of artificial light is a significant threat to certain fledgling shearwaters, petrels (Procellariidae), and storm-petrels (Hydrobatidae) on their first nocturnal flights to the sea. Disorientation by light can cause these birds to crash into vegetation or manmade structures, potentially resulting in death from physical injury, starvation, dehydration, predation by introduced predators, or collisions with vehicles. We developed a GIS-based method to model the intensity of artificial light that fledgling procellariids and hydrobatids could view en route to the ocean (to estimate the degree of threat that artificial light poses to these birds) and present two models for the island of Kauai as examples. These models are particularly relevant to the federally threatened Newell's Shearwater, or `A`o (Puffinus newelli), of which >30,000 fledglings have been collected in response to disorientation by lights on Kauai during the past 30 years. Our models suggest that there are few to no portions of Kauai from which young birds could fledge and not view light on their post-natal nocturnal flights, which is concerning given evidence of a Newell's Shearwater population decline. In future work using this technique, night light intensity layers could be altered to model the effects of modified coastal light conditions on known and potential procellariid and hydrobatid breeding locations. Furthermore, certain methods presented herein may be applicable to other seabirds and additional taxa in which attraction to anthropogenic light poses a serious threat, including migratory passerines and hatchling marine turtles. Components of this modeling approach could potentially be used to spatially estimate effects of other point-source threats to ecological systems, including sound and air pollution.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 60  
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