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Author (up) Fonken, L.K.; Lieberman, R.A.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Dim light at night exaggerates weight gain and inflammation associated with a high-fat diet in male mice Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Endocrinology
Volume 154 Issue 10 Pages 3817-3825
Keywords Adipose Tissue, White/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Animals; Antigens, CD11b/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Appetite Regulation/*radiation effects; Arcuate Nucleus/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Behavior, Animal/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm; Cytokines/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Diet, High-Fat/*adverse effects; Feeding Behavior/radiation effects; Gene Expression Regulation; Glucose Intolerance/etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; I-kappa B Kinase/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Insulin Resistance; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Mice; Microglia/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Nerve Tissue Proteins/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Obesity/*etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Random Allocation; *Weight Gain
Abstract Elevated nighttime light exposure is associated with symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In industrialized societies, high-fat diet (HFD) and exposure to light at night (LAN) often cooccur and may contribute to the increasing obesity epidemic. Thus, we hypothesized that dim LAN (dLAN) would provoke additional and sustained body mass gain in mice on a HFD. Male mice were housed in either a standard light/dark cycle or dLAN and fed either chow or HFD. Exposure to dLAN and HFD increase weight gain, reduce glucose tolerance, and alter insulin secretion as compared with light/dark cycle and chow, respectively. The effects of dLAN and HFD appear additive, because mice exposed to dLAN that were fed HFD display the greatest increases in body mass. Exposure to both dLAN and HFD also change the timing of food intake and increase TNFalpha and MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue after 4 experimental weeks. Changes in MAC1 gene expression occur more rapidly due to HFD as compared with dLAN; after 5 days of experimental conditions, mice fed HFD already increase MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue. HFD also elevates microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and hypothalamic TNFalpha, IL-6, and Ikbkb gene expression. Microglia activation is increased by dLAN, but only among chow-fed mice and dLAN does not affect inflammatory gene expression. These results suggest that dLAN exaggerates weight gain and peripheral inflammation associated with HFD.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, 636 Biomedical Research Tower, 460 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210. fonken.1@osu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-7227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23861373 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 93
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Author (up) Mendez, N.; Halabi, D.; Spichiger, C.; Salazar, E.R.; Vergara, K.; Alonso-Vasquez, P.; Carmona, P.; Sarmiento, J.M.; Richter, H.G.; Seron-Ferre, M.; Torres-Farfan, C.
Title Gestational Chronodisruption Impairs Circadian Physiology in Rat Male Offspring, Increasing the Risk of Chronic Disease Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Endocrinology
Volume 157 Issue 12 Pages 4654-4668
Keywords Animals
Abstract Chronic exposure to light at night, as in shift work, alters biological clocks (chronodisruption), impacting negatively pregnancy outcome in human. Actually, the interaction of maternal and fetal circadian systems could be a key factor determining a fitting health in adult. We propose that chronic photoperiod shifts (CPS) during pregnancy, alter maternal circadian rhythms, and impair circadian physiology in the adult offspring, increasing health risks. Pregnant rats were exposed to normal photoperiod (12h-light/12h-dark) or to CSP until 85 gestation. The effects of gestational CPS were evaluated on the mother and adult offspring. In the mother we measured rhythms of heart-rate, body temperature and activity through gestation, and daily rhythms of plasma variables: melatonin, corticosterone, aldosterone and markers of renal function; at 18 days of gestation. In adult offspring, we measured rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), locomotor activity, body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, plasma variables, glucose tolerance and corticosterone response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). CPS altered all maternal circadian rhythms; lengthened gestation and increased newborn weight. The adult CPS offspring presented normal rhythms of clock gene expression in the SCN, locomotor activity and body temperature. However, the daily rhythm of plasma melatonin was absent, and corticosterone, aldosterone, renal markers, blood pressure and heart-rate rhythms were altered. Moreover, CPS offspring presented decreased glucose tolerance and abnormal corticosterone response to ACTH. Altogether, these data shows that gestational CPS induced long-term effects on the offspring circadian system, wherein a normal SCN coexists with altered endocrine, cardiovascular and metabolic function.
Address Laboratory of Developmental Chronobiology, Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-7227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27802074 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1550
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Author (up) Thorn, L.; Hucklebridge, F.; Esgate, A.; Evans, P.; Clow, A.
Title The effect of dawn simulation on the cortisol response to awakening in healthy participants Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology
Volume 29 Issue 7 Pages 925-930
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Affect/*physiology/radiation effects; Arousal/*physiology/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; Hydrocortisone/analysis/*physiology/radiation effects; *Light; Male; Middle Aged; Reference Values; Saliva/chemistry; Wakefulness/*physiology/radiation effects
Abstract Bright light exposure after awakening has been shown to elevate cortisol levels in healthy participants. The present study examined the effect of dawn simulation (a treatment for seasonal affective disorder) on the cortisol response to awakening and mood. Twelve healthy participants were supplied with a dawn simulator (The Natural Alarm Clock, Outside In, Cambridge Ltd), a bedside light that increases in intensity prior to awakening to approximately 250 lux over 30 mins when an audible alarm sounds. A counterbalanced study was performed on 4 consecutive normal weekdays, two of which were control days (no dawn simulation) and two experimental (dawn simulation). Saliva samples were taken immediately on awakening then at 15, 30 and 45 minutes post awakening on all 4 study-days. Total cortisol production during the first 45 mins after awakening was found to be significantly higher in the experimental condition than in the control condition. Participants also reported greater arousal in the experimental condition and there was a trend for an association between increased arousal and increased cortisol secretory activity under dawn simulation. This study provides supportive evidence for the role of light and the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the awakening cortisol response.
Address Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1R 8AL, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15177708 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 824
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Author (up) Weil, Z.M.; Borniger, J.C.; Cisse, Y.M.; Abi Salloum, B.A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Neuroendocrine control of photoperiodic changes in immune function Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology
Volume 37 Issue Pages 108-118
Keywords Animals; Photoperiod; Melatonin day length; Seasonality immune function; Neuroendocrine
Abstract Seasonal variation in immune function putatively maximizes survival and reproductive success. Day length (photoperiod) is the most potent signal for time of year. Animals typically organize breeding, growth, and behavior to adapt to spatial and temporal niches. Outside the tropics individuals monitor photoperiod to support adaptations favoring survival and reproductive success. Changes in day length allow anticipation of seasonal changes in temperature and food availability that are critical for reproductive success. Immune function is typically bolstered during winter, whereas reproduction and growth are favored during summer. We provide an overview of how photoperiod influences neuronal function and melatonin secretion, how melatonin acts directly and indirectly to govern seasonal changes in immune function, and the manner by which other neuroendocrine effectors such as glucocorticoids, prolactin, thyroid, and sex steroid hormones modulate seasonal variations in immune function. Potential future research avenues include commensal gut microbiota and light pollution influences on photoperiodic responses.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Ohio State University, Biomedical Research Tower #618, 460 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-3022 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1062
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Author (up) Wilhelm, I.; Born, J.; Kudielka, B.M.; Schlotz, W.; Wust, S.
Title Is the cortisol awakening rise a response to awakening? Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology
Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 358-366
Keywords Human Health; Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/blood; Adult; Arousal/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Hydrocortisone/blood/*metabolism; Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiology; Male; Pituitary-Adrenal System/physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology
Abstract A distinct rise in cortisol levels that occurs after morning awakening is increasingly used as an indicator of adrenocortical activity which is associated with different pathologies. Although it was previously assumed that the transition from sleep to wake is essential for the occurrence of the cortisol morning rise, this has never been tested. Here, we examined 16 healthy young men (20-33 yrs) between 2300 and 0800 h under sleep laboratory conditions. Serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) as well as salivary cortisol levels (after subjects were woken up at 0700 h) were repeatedly assessed. In a supplementary study condition, salivary cortisol levels in the first hour after awakening were measured at the subjects' home on two consecutive days. Comparison of pre- and post awakening measurements revealed significantly steeper increases in cortisol and ACTH after awakening. The rise in cortisol upon awakening under laboratory conditions did not significantly differ from that observed at home. We conclude that the cortisol increase after awakening is a response to morning awakening that is distinct from the circadian rise in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in the morning hours. Although the cortisol awakening response is modulated by circadian influences, it primarily reflects phasic psychophysiological processes specific to the sleep-wake transition.
Address Department of Psychobiology, University of Trier, Johanniterufer 15, 54290 Trier, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17408865 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 834
Permanent link to this record