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Author (up) Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Duffy, J.P.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Contrasting trends in light pollution across Europe based on satellite observed night time lights Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 4 Issue Pages 3789
Keywords remote sensing; light pollution; light at night; DMSP-OLS; satellite; light pollution reduction
Abstract Since the 1970s nighttime satellite images of the Earth from space have provided a striking illustration of the extent of artificial light. Meanwhile, growing awareness of adverse impacts of artificial light at night on scientific astronomy, human health, ecological processes and aesthetic enjoyment of the night sky has led to recognition of light pollution as a significant global environmental issue. Links between economic activity, population growth and artificial light are well documented in rapidly developing regions. Applying a novel method to analysis of satellite images of European nighttime lights over 15 years, we show that while the continental trend is towards increasing brightness, some economically developed regions show more complex patterns with large areas decreasing in observed brightness over this period. This highlights that opportunities exist to constrain and even reduce the environmental impact of artificial light pollution while delivering cost and energy-saving benefits.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, UK TR10 9EZ
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24445659; PMCID:PMC3896907 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 328
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Author (up) Bombieri, G.; Delgado, M. del M.; Russo, L.F.; Garrote, P.J.; López-Bao, J.V.; Fedriani, J.M.; Penteriani, V.
Title Patterns of wild carnivore attacks on humans in urban areas Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Attacks by wild carnivores on humans represent an increasing problem in urban areas across North America and their frequency is expected to rise following urban expansion towards carnivore habitats. Here, we analyzed records of carnivore attacks on humans in urban areas of the U.S. and Canada between 1980 and 2016 to analyze the general patterns of the attacks, as well as describe the landscape structure and, for those attacks occurring at night, the light conditions at the site of the attacks. We found that several behavioral and landscape-related factors were recurrent elements in the attacks recorded. The species for which the attack locations were available (coyote and black bear) attacked in areas with different conditions of landscape structure and artificial light. Specifically, black bears attacked more frequently in areas with abundant and aggregated vegetation cover and scarce buildings and roads, while coyotes attacked in a broader range of landscape conditions. At night, black bears attacked in generally darker areas than coyotes. By providing a comprehensive perspective of the phenomenon, this study will improve our understanding of how effective strategies aimed at reducing the frequency of risky encounters in urban areas should be developed.
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2130
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Author (up) Cho, C.-H.; Moon, J.-H.; Yoon, H.-K.; Kang, S.-G.; Geum, D.; Son, G.-H.; Lim, J.-M.; Kim, L.; Lee, E.-I.; Lee, H.-J.
Title Molecular circadian rhythm shift due to bright light exposure before bedtime is related to subthreshold bipolarity Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 31846
Keywords Human Health
Abstract This study examined the link between circadian rhythm changes due to bright light exposure and subthreshold bipolarity. Molecular circadian rhythms, polysomnography, and actigraphy data were studied in 25 young, healthy male subjects, divided into high and low mood disorder questionnaire (MDQ) score groups. During the first 2 days of the study, the subjects were exposed to daily-living light (150 lux) for 4 hours before bedtime. Saliva and buccal cells were collected 5 times a day for 2 consecutive days. During the subsequent 5 days, the subjects were exposed to bright light (1,000 lux), and saliva and buccal cell samples were collected in the same way. Molecular circadian rhythms were analyzed using sine regression. Circadian rhythms of cortisol (F = 16.956, p < 0.001) and relative PER1/ARNTL gene expression (F = 122.1, p < 0.001) showed a delayed acrophase in both groups after bright light exposure. The high MDQ score group showed a significant delay in acrophase compared to the low MDQ score group only in salivary cortisol (F = 8.528, p = 0.008). The high MDQ score group showed hypersensitivity in cortisol rhythm shift after bright light exposure, suggesting characteristic molecular circadian rhythm changes in the high MDQ score group may be related to biological processes downstream from core circadian clock gene expression.
Address Department of Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27545669 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1513
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Author (up) Cho, E.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, E.; Do, Y.R.; Kim, E.Y.
Title Cycles of circadian illuminance are sufficient to entrain and maintain circadian locomotor rhythms in Drosophila Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 37784
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light at night disrupts the circadian clock and causes serious health problems in the modern world. Here, we show that newly developed four-package light-emitting diodes (LEDs) can provide harmless lighting at night. To quantify the effects of light on the circadian clock, we employed the concept of circadian illuminance (CIL). CIL represents the amount of light weighted toward the wavelengths to which the circadian clock is most sensitive, whereas visual illuminance (VIL) represents the total amount of visible light. Exposure to 12 h:12 h cycles of white LED light with high and low CIL values but a constant VIL value (conditions hereafter referred to as CH/CL) can entrain behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms in flies. Moreover, flies re-entrain to phase shift in the CH/CL cycle. Core-clock proteins are required for the rhythmic behaviors seen with this LED lighting scheme. Taken together, this study provides a guide for designing healthful white LED lights for use at night, and proposes the use of the CIL value for estimating the harmful effects of any light source on organismal health.
Address Neuroscience Graduate Program, BK21 Plus Program, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164 Worldcup-ro, Suwon, 16499, Republic of Korea
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:27883065; PMCID:PMC5121609 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1565
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Author (up) Cisse, Y.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Parental Exposure to Dim Light at Night Prior to Mating Alters Offspring Adaptive Immunity Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue Pages 45497
Keywords Animals
Abstract Exposure to dim light at night (dLAN) disrupts natural light/dark cycles and impairs endogenous circadian rhythms necessary to maintain optimal biological function, including the endocrine and immune systems. We have previously demonstrated that white dLAN compromises innate and cell mediated immune responses in adult Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). We hypothesized that dLAN has transgenerational influences on immune function. Adult male and female Siberian hamsters were exposed to either dark nights (DARK) or dLAN (~5 lux) for 9 weeks, then paired in full factorial design, mated, and thereafter housed under dark nights. Offspring were gestated and reared in dark nights, then tested as adults for cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Maternal exposure to dLAN dampened delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in male offspring. Maternal and paternal exposure to dLAN reduced DTH responses in female offspring. IgG antibodies to a novel antigen were elevated in offspring of dams exposed to dLAN. Paternal exposure to dLAN decreased splenic endocrine receptor expression and global methylation in a parental sex-specific manner. Together, these data suggest that exposure to dLAN has transgenerational effects on endocrine-immune function that may be mediated by global alterations in the epigenetic landscape of immune tissues.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Neuroscience Research Institute, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28361901 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1647
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