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Author (up) Cho, J.R.; Joo, E.Y.; Koo, D.L.; Hong, S.B.
Title Let there be no light: the effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background electroencephalographic rhythms Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 14 Issue 12 Pages 1422-1425
Keywords Eeg; Light; Polysomnography; Sleep; Sleep spindle; Slow oscillation
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Artificial lighting has been beneficial to society, but unnecessary light exposure at night may cause various health problems. We aimed to investigate how whole-night bedside light can affect sleep quality and brain activity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten healthy sleepers underwent two polysomnography (PSG) sessions, one with the lights off and one with the lights on. PSG variables related to sleep quality were extracted and compared between lights-off and lights-on sleep. Spectral analysis was performed to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs to reveal any light-induced differences in background brain rhythms. RESULTS: Lights-on sleep was associated with increased stage 1 sleep (N1), decreased slow-wave sleep (SWS), and increased arousal index. Spectral analysis revealed that theta power (4-8Hz) during REM sleep and slow oscillation (0.5-1Hz), delta (1-4Hz), and spindle (10-16Hz) power during NREM sleep were decreased in lights-on sleep conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Sleeping with the light on not only causes shallow sleep and frequent arousals but also has a persistent effect on brain oscillations, especially those implicated in sleep depth and stability. Our study demonstrates additional hazardous effect of light pollution on health.
Address Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24210607 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 141
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Author (up) Crowley, S.J.; Suh, C.; Molina, T.A.; Fogg, L.F.; Sharkey, K.M.; Carskadon, M.A.
Title Estimating the dim light melatonin onset of adolescents within a 6-h sampling window: the impact of sampling rate and threshold method Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume 20 Issue Pages 59-66
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1324
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Author (up) Dumont, M.; Beaulieu, C.
Title Light exposure in the natural environment: relevance to mood and sleep disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 557-565
Keywords Human Health; Affect; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; *Light; Mood Disorders/*etiology; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*complications; Wakefulness; Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract In addition to being necessary for vision, light also plays a primary role in circadian physiology. Humans are diurnal animals and their biological clock synchronizes their physiological functions in such a way that functions associated with activity happen in the daytime while functions associated with rest occur at night. A misalignment between the endogenous circadian clock and the desired sleep schedule is the main cause of circadian sleep disorders; it may be involved in certain mood disorders as well. Since light is the main environmental cue used by the biological clock to set its own timing in relation to the day-night cycle, inappropriate light exposure can be involved in the physiopathology of circadian disorders. Conversely, when handled properly, controlled light exposure can be used to treat some mood and sleep disorders. While the earliest studies in the field focused solely on exposure to bright light, contemporary studies aim at understanding how the entire profile of light-dark exposure can influence the circadian clock and, consequently, mood, sleep, and vigilance quality. Following a brief summary of the main concepts underlying the non-visual effects of light, this paper presents some studies using ambulatory measurements of light exposure to illustrate how these concepts apply in real-life situations and discusses the clinical relevance of light exposure in the natural environment for mood, sleep, and circadian disorders.
Address Chronobiology Laboratory, Sacre-Coeur Hospital of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4J 1C5. marie.dumont@umontreal.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17383230 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 736
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Author (up) Haus, E.L.; Smolensky, M.H.
Title Shift work and cancer risk: potential mechanistic roles of circadian disruption, light at night, and sleep deprivation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med Rev
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 273-284
Keywords Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Epigenesis, Genetic/physiology; Humans; Light; Melatonin/physiology; Neoplasms/*etiology; Risk Factors; Sleep Deprivation/*complications; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology; oncogenesis
Abstract Shift work that includes a nighttime rotation has become an unavoidable attribute of today's 24-h society. The related disruption of the human circadian time organization leads in the short-term to an array of jet-lag-like symptoms, and in the long-run it may contribute to weight gain/obesity, metabolic syndrome/type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic studies also suggest increased cancer risk, especially for breast cancer, in night and rotating female shift workers. If confirmed in more controlled and detailed studies, the carcinogenic effect of night and shift work will constitute additional serious medical, economic, and social problems for a substantial proportion of the working population. Here, we examine the possible multiple and interconnected cancer-promoting mechanisms as a consequence of shift work, i.e., repeated disruption of the circadian system, pineal hormone melatonin suppression by exposure to light at night, sleep-deprivation-caused impairment of the immune system, plus metabolic changes favoring obesity and generation of proinflammatory reactive oxygen species.
Address Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Minnesota and Health Partners Medical Group, Regions Hospital, 640 Jackson Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55101, USA. Erhard.X.Haus@HealthPartners.com
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1087-0792 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23137527 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 157
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Author (up) Joo, E.Y.; Abbott, S.M.; Reid, K.J.; Wu, D.; Kang, J.; Wilson, J.; Zee, P.C.
Title Timing of light exposure and activity in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 32 Issue Pages 259-265
Keywords Human Health
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To characterize the patterns of light exposure and physical activity level and assess their relationship with sleep quality and depressive symptoms in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD). METHODS: 42 DSWPD (22 female, mean age 34.5 y) and 26 (+/-4 years) age-and-sex-matched controls (12 female, mean age 33.4 y) underwent seven days of light and activity monitoring. RESULTS: Individuals with DSWPD had significantly delayed bed times and wake times, but similar sleep duration compared to controls. Subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) was poorer in DSWPDs compared to controls. Those with DSWPD had significantly more activity and light exposure late at night (2:00-4:00) and significantly less activity and light exposure in the morning (8:00-11:00). Total 24 h levels of light and activity were not significantly different between DSWPD and controls. However, the DSWPD group had significantly more light exposure than controls 22 h after waking, during their sleep period. Later light exposure correlated with higher depression scores [Beck Depression Index (BDI)] and poorer sleep quality (PSQI). CONCLUSIONS: The light exposure patterns observed in DSWPD likely contribute to and perpetuate the chronically delayed sleep and wake phase in these patients. In addition, increased light exposure during the sleep period may also contribute to the poor sleep quality and mood disorders that are common in these individuals.
Address Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: p-zee@northwestern.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27964860 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1639
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