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Author (up) An, K.; Zhao, H.; Miao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Li, Y.-F.; Ma, Y.-Q.; Shi, Y.-M.; Shen, J.-W.; Meng, J.-J.; Yao, Y.-G.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, J.-T.; Bao, J.; Zhang, M.; Xue, T.
Title A circadian rhythm-gated subcortical pathway for nighttime-light-induced depressive-like behaviors in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Besides generating vision, light modulates various physiological functions, including mood. While light therapy applied in the daytime is known to have anti-depressive properties, excessive light exposure at night has been reportedly associated with depressive symptoms. The neural mechanisms underlying this day-night difference in the effects of light are unknown. Using a light-at-night (LAN) paradigm in mice, we showed that LAN induced depressive-like behaviors without disturbing the circadian rhythm. This effect was mediated by a neural pathway from retinal melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells to the dorsal perihabenular nucleus (dpHb) to the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Importantly, the dpHb was gated by the circadian rhythm, being more excitable at night than during the day. This indicates that the ipRGC-->dpHb-->NAc pathway preferentially conducts light signals at night, thereby mediating LAN-induced depressive-like behaviors. These findings may be relevant when considering the mental health effects of the prevalent nighttime illumination in the industrial world.
Address Institute for Stem Cell and Regeneration, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. xuetian@ustc.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1097-6256 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32483349 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2978
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Author (up) Ivan, K.; Holobâcă, I.-H.; Benedek, J.; Török, I.
Title VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Income Estimation at Local Level Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 18 Pages 2950
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The aim of the paper is to develop a model for the real-time estimation of local level income data by combining machine learning, Earth Observation, and Geographic Information System. More exactly, we estimated the income per capita by help of a machine learning model for 46 cities with more than 50,000 inhabitants, based on the National Polar-orbiting Partnership–Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) nighttime satellite images from 2012–2018. For the automation of calculation, a new ModelBuilder type tool was developed within the ArcGIS software called EO-Incity (Earth Observation–Income city). The sum of light (SOL) data extracted by means of the EO-Incity tool and the observed income data were integrated in an algorithm within the MATLAB software in order to calculate a transfer equation and the average error. The results achieved were subsequently reintegrated in EO-Incity and used for the estimation of the income value at local level. The regression analyses highlighted a stable and strong relationship between SOL and income for the analyzed cities. The EO-Incity tool and the machine learning model proved to be efficient in the real-time estimation of the income at local level. When integrated in the information systems specific for smart cities, they can serve as a support for decision-making in order to fight poverty and reduce social inequalities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3138
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Author (up) Jin, H.; Jin, S.; Chen, L.; Cen, S.; Yuan, K.
Title Research on the Lighting Performance of LED Street Lights With Different Color Temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication IEEE Photonics Journal Abbreviated Journal IEEE Photonics J.
Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 1-9
Keywords Lighting; LED; light-emitting diodes; PC-LED; dark adaption; color perception; fog; skyglow
Abstract While light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a very efficient lighting option, whether phosphor-coated LEDs (PC-LEDs) are suitable for street lighting remains to be tested. Correlated color temperature (CCT), mesopic vision illuminance, dark adaption, color perception, fog penetration, and skyglow pollution are important factors that determine alight's suitability for street lighting. In this paper, we have closely examined the lighting performance of LED street lights with different color temperatures and found that low-color-temperature (around 3000 K) PC-LEDs are more suitable for street lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IEEE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1943-0655 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1307
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Author (up) Kaplan, K.A.; Mashash, M.; Williams, R.; Batchelder, H.; Starr-Glass, L.; Zeitzer, J.M.
Title Effect of Light Flashes vs Sham Therapy During Sleep With Adjunct Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Sleep Quality Among Adolescents: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication JAMA Network Open Abbreviated Journal JAMA Netw Open
Volume 2 Issue 9 Pages e1911944
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Importance: Owing to biological, behavioral, and societal factors, sleep duration in teenagers is often severely truncated, leading to pervasive sleep deprivation. Objective: To determine whether a novel intervention, using both light exposure during sleep and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), would increase total sleep time in teenagers by enabling them to go to sleep earlier than usual. Design, Setting, and Participants: This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, conducted between November 1, 2013, and May 31, 2016, among 102 adolescents enrolled full-time in grades 9 to 12, who expressed difficulty going to bed earlier and waking up early enough, was composed of 2 phases. In phase 1, participants were assigned to receive either 3 weeks of light or sham therapy and were asked to try to go to sleep earlier. In phase 2, participants received 4 brief CBT sessions in addition to a modified light or sham therapy. All analyses were performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Interventions: Light therapy consisted of receiving a 3-millisecond light flash every 20 seconds during the final 3 hours of sleep (phase 1) or final 2 hours of sleep (phase 2). Sham therapy used an identical device, but delivered 1 minute of light pulses (appearing in 20-second intervals, for a total of 3 pulses) per hour during the final 3 hours of sleep (phase 1) or 2 hours of sleep (phase 2). Light therapy occurred every night during the 4-week intervention. Cognitive behavioral therapy consisted of four 50-minute in-person sessions once per week. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcome measures included diary-based sleep times, momentary ratings of evening sleepiness, and subjective measures of sleepiness and sleep quality. Results: Among the 102 participants (54 female [52.9%]; mean [SD] age, 15.6 [1.1] years), 72 were enrolled in phase 1 and 30 were enrolled in phase 2. Mixed-effects models revealed that light therapy alone was inadequate in changing the timing of sleep. However, compared with sham therapy plus CBT alone, light therapy plus CBT significantly moved sleep onset a mean (SD) of 50.1 (27.5) minutes earlier and increased nightly total sleep time by a mean (SD) of 43.3 (35.0) minutes. Light therapy plus CBT also resulted in a 7-fold greater increase in bedtime compliance than that observed among participants receiving sham plus CBT (mean [SD], 2.21 [3.91] vs 0.29 [0.76]), as well as a mean 0.55-point increase in subjective evening sleepiness as compared with a mean 0.48-point decrease in participants receiving sham plus CBT as measured on a 7-point sleepiness scale. Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that light exposure during sleep, in combination with a brief, motivation-focused CBT intervention, was able to consistently move bedtimes earlier and increase total sleep time in teenagers. This type of passive light intervention in teenagers may lead to novel therapeutic applications. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01406691.
Address Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2574-3805 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31553469 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2683
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Author (up) Myers, L.; Christian, K.; Kirchner, R.
Title Flowering responses of 48 lines of oilseed rape (Brassica spp.) to vernalization and daylength Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication Australian Journal of Agricultural Research Abbreviated Journal Aust. J. Agric. Res.
Volume 33 Issue 6 Pages 927
Keywords Plants
Abstract Forty-eight lines of Brassica spp, of diverse origins were grown in the glasshouse either under natural daylengths or daylengths extended to 16 h by artificial illumination. Plants were either unvernalized or had been subjected to 6 weeks at 8¦C day and 6¦C night temperatures as seedlings. Lines could be classified into two major groups, according to whether or not vernalization or long photoperiods were essential for 50% flowering within 21 weeks. In six lines, both vernalization and long days were essential for prompt flowering, while only five lines did not respond to either treatment. Strong interactions between lines and treatments were found in the number of leaves and subtended buds at flowering. The results show that a wide range of responses is obtainable from material currently available, offering considerabk, scope for adaptation to different environments.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-9409 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2369
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Author (up) Stokkan, K.-A.; Folkow, L.; Dukes, J.; Neveu, M.; Hogg, C.; Siefken, S.; Dakin, S.C.; Jeffery, G.
Title Shifting mirrors: adaptive changes in retinal reflections to winter darkness in Arctic reindeer Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 280 Issue 1773 Pages 20132451
Keywords Animals; Skyglow
Abstract Arctic reindeer experience extreme changes in environmental light from continuous summer daylight to continuous winter darkness. Here, we show that they may have a unique mechanism to cope with winter darkness by changing the wavelength reflection from their tapetum lucidum (TL). In summer, it is golden with most light reflected back directly through the retina, whereas in winter it is deep blue with less light reflected out of the eye. The blue reflection in winter is associated with significantly increased retinal sensitivity compared with summer animals. The wavelength of reflection depends on TL collagen spacing, with reduced spacing resulting in shorter wavelengths, which we confirmed in summer and winter animals. Winter animals have significantly increased intra-ocular pressure, probably produced by permanent pupil dilation blocking ocular drainage. This may explain the collagen compression. The resulting shift to a blue reflection may scatter light through photoreceptors rather than directly reflecting it, resulting in elevated retinal sensitivity via increased photon capture. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of a retinal structural adaptation to seasonal changes in environmental light. Increased sensitivity occurs at the cost of reduced acuity, but may be an important adaptation in reindeer to detect moving predators in the dark Arctic winter.
Address Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, University of Tromso, , Tromso, Norway, Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, , 11-43 Bath Street, London EC1V 9EL, UK, Moorfields Eye Hospital, , London, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24174115; PMCID:PMC3826237 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1636
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Author (up) Swaminathan, K.; Klerman, E.B.; Phillips, A.J.K.
Title Are Individual Differences in Sleep and Circadian Timing Amplified by Use of Artificial Light Sources? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume Issue Pages 748730417699310
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Within the human population, there is large interindividual variability in the timing of sleep and circadian rhythms. This variability has been attributed to individual differences in sleep physiology, circadian physiology, and/or light exposure. Recent experimental evidence suggests that the latter is necessary to evoke large interindividual differences in sleep and circadian timing. We used a validated model of human sleep and circadian physiology to test the hypothesis that intrinsic differences in sleep and circadian timing are amplified by self-selected use of artificial light sources. We tested the model under 2 conditions motivated by an experimental study (Wright et al., 2013): (1) a “natural” light cycle, and (2) a “realistic” light cycle that included attenuation of light due to living indoors when natural light levels are high and use of electric light when natural light levels are low. Within these conditions, we determined the relationship between intrinsic circadian period (within the range of 23.7-24.6 h) and timing of sleep onset, sleep offset, and circadian rhythms. In addition, we simulated a work week, with fixed wake time for 5 days and free sleep times on weekends. Under both conditions, a longer intrinsic period resulted in later sleep and circadian timing. Compared to the natural condition, the realistic condition evoked more than double the variation in sleep timing across the physiological range of intrinsic circadian periods. Model predictions closely matched data from the experimental study. We found that if the intrinsic circadian period was long (>24.2 h) under the realistic condition, there was significant mismatch in sleep timing between weekdays and weekends, which is known as social jetlag. These findings indicate that individual tendencies to have very delayed schedules can be greatly amplified by self-selected modifications to the natural light/dark cycle. This has important implications for therapeutic treatment of advanced or delayed sleep phase disorders.
Address School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28367676 Approved no
Call Number SU @ spitschan @ Serial 1648
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Author (up) You, X.; Monahan, K.M.
Title A thirst for development: mapping water stress using night-time stable lights as predictors of province-level water stress in China Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Area Abbreviated Journal Area
Volume 49 Issue 4 Pages 477-485
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Given the rapid development within China, the inequality of available water resources has been increasingly of interest. Current methods for assessing water stress are inadequate for province‐scale rapid monitoring. A more responsive indicator at a finer scale is needed to understand the distribution of water stress in China. This paper selected Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line‐scan System night‐time stable lights as a proxy for water stress at the province level in China from 2004 to 2012, as night‐time lights are closely linked with population density, electricity consumption and other social, economic and environmental indicators associated with water stress. The linear regression results showed the intensity of night‐time lights can serve as a predictive tool to assess water stress across provinces with an R2 from 0.797 to 0.854. The model worked especially well in some regions, such as East China, North China and South West China. Nonetheless, confounding factors interfered with the predictive relationship, including population density, level of economic development, natural resource endowment and industrial structures, etc. The model was not greatly improved by building a multi‐variable linear regression including agricultural and industrial indicators. A straightforward predictor of water stress using remotely sensed data was developed.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-0894 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2030
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Author (up) Zhang, H.; Yan, K.; Sui, L.; Nie, J.; Cui, K.; Liu, J.; Zhang, H.; Yang, X.; Lu, K.; Liang, X.
Title Constant light exposure causes oocyte meiotic defects and quality deterioration in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages 115467
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) exposes us to prolonged illumination, that adversely affects female reproduction. However, it remains to be clarified how prolonged light exposure affects oocyte meiotic maturation and quality. To this end, we exposed female mice to a constant light (CL) of 250 lux for different durations. Our findings showed that CL exposure for 7 weeks reduced the oocyte maturation rate. Meanwhile, CL exposure caused greater abnormalities in spindle assembly and chromosome alignment and a higher rate of oocyte aneuploidy than the regular light dark cycle. CL exposure also induced oxidative stress and caused mitochondrial dysfunction, which resulted in oocyte apoptosis and autophagy. Notably, our results showed that CL exposure reduced the levels of α-tubulin acetylation, DNA methylation at 5mC, RNA methylation at m6A and histone methylation at H3K4me2 but increased the levels of histone methylation at H3K27me2 in oocytes. In summary, our findings demonstrate that constant bright light exposure causes oocyte meiotic defects and reduces cytoplasmic quality. These results extend the current understanding of ALAN-mediated defects in female reproduction.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3101
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