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Author (up) James, P.; Bertrand, K.A.; Hart, J.E.; Schernhammer, E.S.; Tamimi, R.M.; Laden, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor Light at Night and Breast Cancer Incidence in the Nurses' Health Study II Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 125 Issue 8 Pages 087010  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Animal and epidemiologic studies suggest that exposure to light at night (LAN) may disrupt circadian patterns and decrease nocturnal secretion of melatonin, which may disturb estrogen regulation, leading to increased breast cancer risk. OBJECTIVES: We examined the association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer incidence using data from the nationwide U.S.-based Nurses' Health Study II cohort. METHODS: We followed 109,672 women from 1989 through 2013. Cumulative LAN exposure was estimated using time-varying satellite data for a composite of persistent nighttime illumination at approximately 1 km(2) scale for each residence during follow-up. Incident invasive breast cancer cases were confirmed by medical record review. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for anthropometric, reproductive, lifestyle, and socioeconomic risk factors. RESULTS: Over 2,187,425 person-years, we identified 3,549 incident breast cancer cases. Based on a fully adjusted model, the estimated HR for incident breast cancer with an interquartile range (IQR) (31.6 nW/cm(2)/sr) increase in cumulative average outdoor LAN was 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11). An association between LAN and breast cancer appeared to be limited to women who were premenopausal at the time of a case [HR=1.07 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.14) based on 1,973 cases vs. HR=1.00 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.09) based on 1,172 cases in postmenopausal women; p-interaction=0.08]. The LAN-breast cancer association was observed only in past and current smokers at the end of follow-up [HR=1.00 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.07) based on 2,215 cases in never smokers; HR=1.10 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.19) based on 1,034 cases in past smokers vs. HR=1.21 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.37) for 300 cases in current smokers; p-interaction=0.08]. CONCLUSIONS: Although further work is required to confirm our results and to clarify potential mechanisms, our findings suggest that exposure to residential outdoor light at night may contribute to invasive breast cancer risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP935.  
  Address Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28886600; PMCID:PMC5783660 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1886  
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Author (up) Marinac, C.R.; Quante, M.; Mariani, S.; Weng, J.; Redline, S.; Cespedes Feliciano, E.M.; Hipp, J.A.; Wang, D.; Kaplan, E.R.; James, P.; Mitchell, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Associations Between Timing of Meals, Physical Activity, Light Exposure, and Sleep With Body Mass Index in Free-Living Adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Physical Activity & Health Abbreviated Journal J Phys Act Health  
  Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 214-221  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study tested if the timing of meals, physical activity, light exposure, and sleep cluster within individuals and are associated with body mass index (BMI) in a sample of free-living adults (N = 125). METHODS: Data were collected between November 2015 and March 2016 at the University of California, San Diego, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Washington University in St Louis. Height and weight were measured, and BMI (kg/m(2)) was calculated. Sleep timing was estimated using actigraphy, and timing of meals, physical activity, and light exposure were self-reported using a smartphone application. General linear models estimated the mean BMI across time categories of behaviors, adjusting for covariates. A latent class analysis was used to identify patterns of timing variables that clustered within individuals and test for associations between identified patterns and BMI. RESULTS: Later exposure to outdoor light was associated with a lower BMI (P trend < .01). The timing of other behaviors was not independently associated with BMI. The latent class analysis identified 2 distinct groups related to behavioral timing, reflecting an “early bird” and “night owl” phenotype. These phenotypes were not associated with BMI (P > .05). CONCLUSION: Timing of exposures to light, meals, sleep, and physical activity were not strongly associated with BMI in this sample.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1543-3080 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30798690 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2241  
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Author (up) Paksarian, D.; Rudolph, K.E.; Stapp, E.K.; Dunster, G.P.; He, J.; Mennitt, D.; Hattar, S.; Casey, J.A.; James, P.; Merikangas, K.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association of Outdoor Artificial Light at Night With Mental Disorders and Sleep Patterns Among US Adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication JAMA Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal JAMA Psychiatry  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Importance: Indoor nighttime light exposure influences sleep and circadian rhythms and is known to affect mood-associated brain circuits in animals. However, little is known about the association between levels of nighttime outdoor light and sleep and mental health in the population, especially among adolescents. Objective: To estimate associations of outdoor artificial light at night (ALAN) with sleep patterns and past-year mental disorder among US adolescents. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based, cross-sectional study of US adolescents used the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey conducted from February 2001 through January 2004. A probability sample of adolescents aged 13 to 18 years was included. Analyses were conducted between February 2019 and April 2020. Exposures: Levels of outdoor ALAN, measured by satellite, with means calculated within census block groups. ALAN values were transformed into units of radiance (nW/cm2/sr). Main Outcomes and Measures: Self-reported habitual sleep patterns (weeknight bedtime, weeknight sleep duration, weekend bedtime delay, and weekend oversleep) and past-year mood, anxiety, behavior, and substance use disorders, measured via an in-person structured diagnostic interview. Parent-reported information was included in behavior disorder diagnoses. Results: Among 10123 adolescents (4953 boys [51.3%]; mean [SE] age, 15.2 [0.06] years [weighted]; 6483 for behavior disorder outcomes), ALAN was positively associated with indicators of social disadvantage, such as racial/ethnic minority status (median [IQR] ALAN: white adolescents, 12.96 [30.51] nW/cm2/sr; Hispanic adolescents: 38.54 [47.84] nW/cm2/sr; non-Hispanic black adolescents: 37.39 [51.88] nW/cm2/sr; adolescents of other races/ethnicities: 30.94 [49.93] nW/cm2/sr; P < .001) and lower family income (median [IQR] ALAN by family income-to-poverty ratio </=1.5: 26.76 [52.48] nW/cm2/sr; >6: 21.46 [34.38] nW/cm2/sr; P = .005). After adjustment for several sociodemographic characteristics, as well as area-level population density and socioeconomic status, this study found that higher ALAN levels were associated with later weeknight bedtime, and those in the lowest quartile of ALAN reported the longest weeknight sleep duration. Those in the highest quartile of ALAN went to bed 29 (95% CI, 15-43) minutes later and reported 11 (95% CI, 19-2) fewer minutes of sleep than those in the lowest quartile. ALAN was also positively associated with prevalence of past-year mood and anxiety disorder: each median absolute deviation increase in ALAN was associated with 1.07 (95% CI, 1.00-1.14) times the odds of mood disorder and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.05-1.16) times the odds of anxiety disorder. Further analyses revealed associations with bipolar disorder (odds ratio [OR], 1.19 [95% CI, 1.05-1.35]), specific phobias (OR, 1.18 [95% CI, 1.11-1.26]), and major depressive disorder or dysthymia (OR, 1.07 [95% CI, 1.00-1.15]). Among adolescent girls, differences in weeknight bedtime by ALAN (third and fourth quartiles vs first quartile) were greater with increasing years since menarche (F3, 8.15; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, area-level outdoor ALAN was associated with less favorable sleep patterns and mood and anxiety disorder in adolescents. Future studies should elucidate whether interventions to reduce exposure to ALAN may positively affect mental and sleep health.  
  Address Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-622X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32639562 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3034  
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Author (up) Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 180 Issue Pages 108823  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.  
  Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702  
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Author (up) Xiao, Q.; James, P.; Breheny, P.; Jia, P.; Park, Y.; Zhang, D.; Fisher, J.A.; Ward, M.H.; Jones, R.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP diet and health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian disruption; outdoor light at night; postmenopausal breast cancer; prospective cohort  
  Abstract Circadian disruption may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Previous studies reported relationships between outdoor light at night (LAN) and the breast cancer risk, but their findings are mixed. There is also a need to examine LAN and breast cancer incidence according to different individual and environmental characteristics to identify subpopulations at greater risk associated with LAN exposure. We studied residential outdoor LAN estimated from satellite imagery at baseline (1996) in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer incidence over ~16 years of follow-up in 186 981 postmenopausal women including 12 318 incident postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the relationship between quintiles of LAN and postmenopausal breast cancer risk, overall and by hormone receptor status and cancer stage. We found that when compared to women in the lowest quintile of baseline LAN, those in the highest quintile had a 10% increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk (HR (95% CI), 1.10 (1.02, 1.18), P-trend, .002). The association appeared to be stronger for estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer (1.12 [1.02, 1.24], .007) than for ER-negative cancer (1.07 [0.85, 1.34], .66). Our findings also suggested that the relationship between LAN and breast cancer risk may differ by individual characteristics, such as smoking, alcohol drinking, sleep duration and BMI, and neighborhood environment. In conclusion, our study suggests that higher outdoor LAN exposure may be a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer.  
  Address Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32488897 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2976  
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Author (up) Zhang, D.; Jones, R.R.; Powell-Wiley, T.M.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Xiao, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A large prospective investigation of outdoor light at night and obesity in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Health : a Global Access Science Source Abbreviated Journal Environ Health  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 74  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Circadian rhythms; Light at night; Light pollution; Obesity  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Research has suggested that artificial light at night (LAN) may disrupt circadian rhythms, sleep, and contribute to the development of obesity. However, almost all previous studies are cross-sectional, thus, there is a need for prospective investigations of the association between LAN and obesity risk. The goal of our current study was to examine the association between baseline LAN and the development of obesity over follow-up in a large cohort of American adults. METHODS: The study included a sample of 239,781 men and women (aged 50-71) from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study who were not obese at baseline (1995-1996). We used multiple logistic regression to examine whether LAN at baseline was associated with the odds of developing obesity at follow-up (2004-2006). Outdoor LAN exposure was estimated from satellite imagery and obesity was measured based on self-reported weight and height. RESULTS: We found that higher outdoor LAN at baseline was associated with higher odds of developing obesity over 10 years. Compared with the lowest quintile of LAN, the highest quintile was associated with 12% and 19% higher odds of developing obesity at follow-up in men (OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.00, 1.250)) and women (1.19 (1.04, 1.36)), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that high LAN exposure could predict a higher risk of developing obesity in middle-to-older aged American adults.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, Houston, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1476-069X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32611430; PMCID:PMC7329409 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3029  
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