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Author (up) Brüning A., Hölker, F., Franke, S., Preuer, T., Kloas, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 543 Issue Pages 214-222  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1294  
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Author (up) Brüning A., Hölker, F., Franke, S., Preuer, T., Kloas, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spotlight on fish: Light pollution affects circadian rhythms of European perch but does not cause stress Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 511 Issue Pages 516-522  
  Keywords Animals; Perca fluviatilis; Light pollution; Light intensity; Non-invasive hormone measurement; Fish  
  Abstract Flora and fauna evolved under natural day and night cycles. However, natural light is now enhanced by artificial light at night, particularly in urban areas. This alteration of natural light environments during the night is hypothesised to alter biological rhythms in fish, by effecting night-time production of the hormone melatonin. Artificial light at night is also expected to increase the stress level of fish, resulting in higher cortisol production. In laboratory experiments, European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to four different light intensities during the night, 0 lx (control), 1 lx (potential light level in urban waters), 10 lx (typical street lighting at night) and 100 lx. Melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured from water samples every 3 h during a 24 hour period. This study revealed that the nocturnal increase in melatonin production was inhibited even at the lowest light level of 1 lx. However, cortisol levels did not differ between control and treatment illumination levels. We conclude that artificial light at night at very low intensities may disturb biological rhythms in fish since nocturnal light levels around 1 lx are already found in urban waters. However, enhanced stress induction could not be demonstrated.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1087  
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Author (up) Brüning, A.; Hölker, F.; Franke, S.; Kleiner, W.; Kloas, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of light intensity and spectral composition of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and mRNA expression of gonadotropins in roach Rutilus rutilus Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Fish Physiology and Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal Fish Physiol Biochem  
  Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract In this study we investigated the influence of artificial light at night (ALAN) of different intensities (0, 1, 10, 100 lx) and different colours (blue, green, red) on the daily melatonin rhythm and mRNA expression of gonadotropins in roach Rutilus rutilus, a ubiquitous cyprinid, which occur in standing and moderately flowing freshwater habitats of central Europe. Melatonin concentrations were significantly lowered under nocturnal white light already at 1 lx. Low intensity blue, green and red ALAN lowered the melatonin levels significantly in comparison to a dark control. We conclude that ALAN can disturb melatonin rhythms in roach at very low intensities and at different wavelengths and thus light pollution in urban waters has the potential to impact biological rhythms in fish. However, mRNA expression of gonadotropins was not affected by ALAN during the period of the experiments. Thus, suspected implications of ALAN on reproduction of roach could not be substantiated.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Muggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0920-1742 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28721487 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1684  
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Author (up) Bruning, A.; Hölker, F.; Franke, S.; Kleiner, W.; Kloas, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 543 Issue Pt A Pages 214-222  
  Keywords Animals; Fish; Gonadotropins; Light pollution; Melatonin; Perca fluviatilis; Reproduction; Spectral sensitivity  
  Abstract The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0lx, 1lx, 10lx, 100lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Muggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: werner.kloas(at)igb-berlin.de  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26584071 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1302  
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Author (up) Brüning, A.; Hölker, F.; Franke, S.; Preuer, T.; Kloas, W. url  openurl
  Title Spotlight on fish: Light pollution affects circadian rhythms of European perch but does not cause stress Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 511 Issue Pages 516-522  
  Keywords animals; fish; Circadian Rhythm; melatonin; cortisol  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1580  
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Author (up) Brüning, A.; Kloas, W.; Preuer, T.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of artificially induced light pollution on the hormone system of two common fish species, perch and roach, in a rural habitat Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Almost all life on earth has adapted to natural cycles of light and dark by evolving circadian and circannual rhythms to synchronize behavioural and physiological processes with the environment. Artificial light at night (ALAN) is suspected to interfere with these rhythms. In this study we examined the influence of ALAN on nocturnal melatonin and sex steroid blood concentrations and mRNA expression of gonadotropins in the pituitary of European perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus). In a rural experimental setting, fish were held in net cages in drainage channels experiencing either additional ALAN of ~15 lx at the water surface or natural light conditions at half-moon. No differences in melatonin concentrations between ALAN and natural conditions were detected. However, blood concentration of sex steroids (17β-estradiol; 11-ketotestosterone) as well as mRNA expression of gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone) was reduced in both fish species. We conclude that ALAN can disturb biological rhythms in fish in urban waters. However, impacts on melatonin rhythm might have been blurred by individual differences, sampling methods and moonlight. The effect of ALAN on biomarkers of reproduction suggests a photo-labile period around the onset of gonadogenesis, including the experimental period (August). Light pollution therefore has a great potential to influence crucial life history traits with unpredictable outcome for fish population dynamics.  
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  ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1858  
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Author (up) Franke, S.; Brüning, A.; Hölker, F.; Kloas, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study of biological action of light on fish Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Light & Visual Environment Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 37 Issue 4 Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 698  
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Author (up) Hölker, F.; Moss, T.; Griefahn, B.; Kloas, W.; Voigt, C.; et al. url  openurl
  Title The Dark Side of Light: A Transdisciplinary Research Agenda for Light Pollution Policy Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Ecol Soc Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Ecology; artificial light; energy efficiency; lighting concept; light pollution; nightscape; policy; sustainability; transdisciplinary  
  Abstract Although the invention and widespread use of artificial light is clearly one of the most important human technological advances, the transformation of nightscapes is increasingly recognized as having adverse effects. Night lighting may have serious physiological consequences for humans, ecological and evolutionary implications for animal and plant populations, and may reshape entire ecosystems. However, knowledge on the adverse effects of light pollution is vague. In response to climate change and energy shortages, many countries, regions, and communities are developing new lighting programs and concepts with a strong focus on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the dramatic increase in artificial light at night (0 – 20% per year, depending on geographic region), we see an urgent need for light pollution policies that go beyond energy efficiency to include human well-being, the structure and functioning of ecosystems, and inter-related socioeconomic consequences. Such a policy shift will require a sound transdisciplinary understanding of the significance of the night, and its loss, for humans and the natural systems upon which we depend. Knowledge is also urgently needed on suitable lighting technologies and concepts which are ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable. Unless managing darkness becomes an integral part of future conservation and lighting policies, modern society may run into a global self-experiment with unpredictable outcomes.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 478  
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