toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Vetter, C.; Juda, M.; Lang, D.; Wojtysiak, A.; Roenneberg, T. url  openurl
  Title Blue-enriched office light competes with natural light as a zeitgeber Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication (up) Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health  
  Volume 37 Issue 5 Pages 437-445  
  Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; *Color; Humans; *Lighting; *Occupational Health; Sleep; Wakefulness; blue light; circadian disruption; Circadian rhythm; sleep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Circadian regulation of human physiology and behavior (eg, body temperature or sleep-timing), depends on the “zeitgeber” light that synchronizes them to the 24-hour day. This study investigated the effect of changing light temperature at the workplace from 4000 Kelvin (K) to 8000 K on sleep-wake and activity-rest behavior. METHODS: An experimental group (N=27) that experienced the light change was compared with a non-intervention group (N=27) that remained in the 4000 K environment throughout the 5-week study period (14 January to 17 February). Sleep logs and actimetry continuously assessed sleep-wake behavior and activity patterns. RESULTS: Over the study period, the timing of sleep and activity on free days steadily advanced parallel to the seasonal progression of sunrise in the non-intervention group. In contrast, the temporal pattern of sleep and activity in the experimental group remained associated with the constant onset of work. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that artificial blue-enriched light competes with natural light as a zeitgeber. While subjects working under the warmer light (4000 K) appear to entrain (or synchronize) to natural dawn, the subjects who were exposed to blue-enriched (8000 K) light appear to entrain to office hours. The results confirm that light is the dominant zeitgeber for the human clock and that its efficacy depends on spectral composition. The results also indicate that blue-enriched artificial light is a potent zeitgeber that has to be used with diligence.  
  Address Institute for Medical Psychology, Centre of Chronobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21246176 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 350  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rabstein, S.; Burek, K.; Lehnert, M.; Beine, A.; Vetter, C.; Harth, V.; Putzke, S.; Kantermann, T.; Walther, J.; Wang-Sattler, R.; Pallapies, D.; Brüning, T.; Behrens, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Differences in twenty-four-hour profiles of blue-light exposure between day and night shifts in female medical staff Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 653 Issue Pages 1025-1033  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Light is the strongest zeitgeber currently known for the synchronization of the human circadian timing system. Especially shift workers are exposed to altered daily light profiles. Our objective is the characterization of differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shift taking into consideration modifying factors such as chronotype. We describe 24-hour blue-light profiles as measured with ambient light data loggers (LightWatcher) during up to three consecutive days with either day or night shifts in 100 female hospital staff including 511 observations. Linear mixed models were applied to analyze light profiles and to select time-windows for the analysis of associations between shift work, individual factors, and log mean light exposures as well as the duration of darkness per day. Blue-light profiles reflected different daily activities and were mainly influenced by work time. Except for evening (7–9 p.m.), all time windows showed large differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shifts. Night work reduced the duration of darkness per day by almost 4 h (beta = −3:48 hh:mm, 95% CI (−4:27; −3.09)). Late chronotypes had higher light exposures in the morning and evening compared to women with intermediate chronotype (e.g. morning beta = 0.50 log(mW/m2/nm), 95% CI (0.08; 0.93)). Women with children had slightly higher light exposures in the afternoon than women without children (beta = 0.48, 95% CI (−0.10; 1,06)). Time windows for the description of light should be chosen carefully with regard to timing of shifts. Our results are helpful for future studies to capture relevant light exposure differences and potential collinearities with individual factors. Improvement of well-being of shift workers with altered light profiles may therefore require consideration of both – light at the workplace and outside working hours.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2139  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vetter, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption: What do we actually mean? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The circadian system regulates physiology and behavior. Acute challenges to the system, such as those experienced during travel across time zones, will eventually result in re-synchronization to the local environmental time cues, but this re-synchronization is oftentimes accompanied by adverse short-term consequences. When such challenges are experienced chronically, adaptation may not be achieved, as for example in the case of rotating night shift workers. The transient and chronic disturbance of the circadian system is most frequently referred to as “circadian disruption”, but many other terms have been proposed and used to refer to similar situations. It is now beyond doubt that the circadian system contributes to health and disease, emphasizing the need for clear terminology when describing challenges to the circadian system and their consequences. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the terms used to describe disruption of the circadian system, discuss proposed quantifications of disruption in experimental and observational settings with a focus on human research, and highlight limitations and challenges of currently available tools. For circadian research to advance as a translational science, clear, operationalizable, and scalable quantifications of circadian disruption are key, as they will enable improved assessment and reproducibility of results, ideally ranging from mechanistic settings, including animal research, to large-scale randomized clinical trials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30402904 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2057  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: