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Author (up) De Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J. M.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Ocaña, F.; Pascual Ramírez, S.; López Cayuela, M. A.,; et al.
Title ). Contaminaci{ó}n lum{í}nica en Espa{ñ}a 2012: Light pollution in Spain 2012 Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication In Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VII Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue Pages 956
Keywords Remote Sensing
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 926
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Author (up) Hölker, F.; Moss, T.; Griefahn, B.; Kloas, W.; Voigt, C.; et al.
Title The Dark Side of Light: A Transdisciplinary Research Agenda for Light Pollution Policy Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Ecol Soc Abbreviated Journal
Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Ecology; artificial light; energy efficiency; lighting concept; light pollution; nightscape; policy; sustainability; transdisciplinary
Abstract Although the invention and widespread use of artificial light is clearly one of the most important human technological advances, the transformation of nightscapes is increasingly recognized as having adverse effects. Night lighting may have serious physiological consequences for humans, ecological and evolutionary implications for animal and plant populations, and may reshape entire ecosystems. However, knowledge on the adverse effects of light pollution is vague. In response to climate change and energy shortages, many countries, regions, and communities are developing new lighting programs and concepts with a strong focus on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the dramatic increase in artificial light at night (0 – 20% per year, depending on geographic region), we see an urgent need for light pollution policies that go beyond energy efficiency to include human well-being, the structure and functioning of ecosystems, and inter-related socioeconomic consequences. Such a policy shift will require a sound transdisciplinary understanding of the significance of the night, and its loss, for humans and the natural systems upon which we depend. Knowledge is also urgently needed on suitable lighting technologies and concepts which are ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable. Unless managing darkness becomes an integral part of future conservation and lighting policies, modern society may run into a global self-experiment with unpredictable outcomes.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 478
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Author (up) Lolkema, D.T.; et al
Title Position Paper from the User Community Earth Observation of Nighttime Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Unpublished position paper Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Artificial night lighting is a unique sign of human activity. Pictures from space show us

beautifully and strikingly how we illuminate our planet. Light emission (and low-light

reflection) data can aid research in numerous fields, from socio-economic studies, via light

pollution, to emergency response. The only instrument currently capable of measuring

nighttime lights from space is the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program – Operational

Linescan System (DMSP-OLS). Although this unique dataset was the first to allow analysis

of our nighttime activities, it has many shortcomings, such as rather coarse spatial resolution

(2.5 km ground sampling distance), only panchromatic visible spectral information and no

visible band calibration, 6-bit quantification, saturation and overglow. By the end of 2011, a

new instrument will be launched, the Visible-Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)

onboard the NPOESS1

Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite. This instrument remedies some of

the shortcomings of the DMSP-OLS instrument, but it still is not designed for earth

observation of nighttime lighting and lacks many specifications we advocate here. On June

10th 2011, the High Sensitivity Camera (HSC) onboard the Aquarius/SAC-D satellite was

launched successfully. This instrument has a panchromatic band (450 – 610 nm) and a

resolution of 200-300 meters. The foreseen products and other characteristics are yet

unknown to the authors.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 489
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Author (up) Lolkema; D.T.; et al
Title Position Paper from the User Community Earth Observation of Nighttime Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Unpublished position paper Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Editorial
Abstract Artificial night lighting is a unique sign of human activity. Pictures from space show us

beautifully and strikingly how we illuminate our planet. Light emission (and low-light

reflection) data can aid research in numerous fields, from socio-economic studies, via light

pollution, to emergency response. The only instrument currently capable of measuring

nighttime lights from space is the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program – Operational

Linescan System (DMSP-OLS). Although this unique dataset was the first to allow analysis

of our nighttime activities, it has many shortcomings, such as rather coarse spatial resolution

(2.5 km ground sampling distance), only panchromatic visible spectral information and no

visible band calibration, 6-bit quantification, saturation and overglow. By the end of 2011, a

new instrument will be launched, the Visible-Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)

onboard the NPOESS1

Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite. This instrument remedies some of

the shortcomings of the DMSP-OLS instrument, but it still is not designed for earth

observation of nighttime lighting and lacks many specifications we advocate here. On June

10th 2011, the High Sensitivity Camera (HSC) onboard the Aquarius/SAC-D satellite was

launched successfully. This instrument has a panchromatic band (450 – 610 nm) and a

resolution of 200-300 meters. The foreseen products and other characteristics are yet

unknown to the authors.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 463
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Oda, T., Bun, R., Kinakh, V. et al.
Title Errors and uncertainties in a gridded carbon dioxide emissions inventory Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change Abbreviated Journal
Volume 24 Issue 6 Pages 1007-1050
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Emission inventories (EIs) are the fundamental tool to monitor compliance with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and emission reduction commitments. Inventory accounting guidelines provide the best practices to help EI compilers across different countries and regions make comparable, national emission estimates regardless of differences in data availability. However, there are a variety of sources of error and uncertainty that originate beyond what the inventory guidelines can define. Spatially explicit EIs, which are a key product for atmospheric modeling applications, are often developed for research purposes and there are no specific guidelines to achieve spatial emission estimates. The errors and uncertainties associated with the spatial estimates are unique to the approaches employed and are often difficult to assess. This study compares the global, high-resolution (1 km), fossil fuel, carbon dioxide (CO2), gridded EI Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2 (ODIAC) with the multi-resolution, spatially explicit bottom-up EI geoinformation technologies, spatio-temporal approaches, and full carbon account for improving the accuracy of GHG inventories (GESAPU) over the domain of Poland. By taking full advantage of the data granularity that bottom-up EI offers, this study characterized the potential biases in spatial disaggregation by emission sector (point and non-point emissions) across different scales (national, subnational/regional, and urban policy-relevant scales) and identified the root causes. While two EIs are in agreement in total and sectoral emissions (2.2% for the total emissions), the emission spatial patterns showed large differences (10~100% relative differences at 1 km) especially at the urban-rural transitioning areas (90–100%). We however found that the agreement of emissions over urban areas is surprisingly good compared with the estimates previously reported for US cities. This paper also discusses the use of spatially explicit EIs for climate mitigation applications beyond the common use in atmospheric modeling. We conclude with a discussion of current and future challenges of EIs in support of successful implementation of GHG emission monitoring and mitigation activity under the Paris Climate Agreement from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21). We highlight the importance of capacity building for EI development and coordinated research efforts of EI, atmospheric observations, and modeling to overcome the challenges.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2644
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