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Author (up) Chaves, I.; Pokorny, R.; Byrdin, M.; Hoang, N.; Ritz, T.; Brettel, K.; Essen, L.-O.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Batschauer, A.; Ahmad, M.
Title The cryptochromes: blue light photoreceptors in plants and animals Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Annual Review of Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Plant Biol
Volume 62 Issue Pages 335-364
Keywords Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism; Animals; Cryptochromes/chemistry/classification/*physiology; DNA Repair; Deoxyribodipyrimidine Photo-Lyase/chemistry/classification/physiology; Homing Behavior; Insects/physiology; *Light Signal Transduction; Magnetics; Mice; Oxidation-Reduction; Phosphorylation/physiology; Plants/*metabolism; blue light
Abstract Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, where they play key roles in growth and development. Subsequently identified in prokaryotes, archaea, and many eukaryotes, cryptochromes function in the animal circadian clock and are proposed as magnetoreceptors in migratory birds. Cryptochromes are closely structurally related to photolyases, evolutionarily ancient flavoproteins that catalyze light-dependent DNA repair. Here, we review the structural, photochemical, and molecular properties of cry-DASH, plant, and animal cryptochromes in relation to biological signaling mechanisms and uncover common features that may contribute to better understanding the function of cryptochromes in diverse systems including in man.
Address Department of Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. i.chaves@erasmusmc.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1543-5008 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21526969 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 341
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Author (up) McKenna, H.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Reiss, I.; Martin, D.
Title Clinical chronobiology: a timely consideration in critical care medicine Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Critical Care (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Crit Care
Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 124
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract A fundamental aspect of human physiology is its cyclical nature over a 24-h period, a feature conserved across most life on Earth. Organisms compartmentalise processes with respect to time in order to promote survival, in a manner that mirrors the rotation of the planet and accompanying diurnal cycles of light and darkness. The influence of circadian rhythms can no longer be overlooked in clinical settings; this review provides intensivists with an up-to-date understanding of the burgeoning field of chronobiology, and suggests ways to incorporate these concepts into daily practice to improve patient outcomes. We outline the function of molecular clocks in remote tissues, which adjust cellular and global physiological function according to the time of day, and the potential clinical advantages to keeping in time with them. We highlight the consequences of “chronopathology”, when this harmony is lost, and the risk factors for this condition in critically ill patients. We introduce the concept of “chronofitness” as a new target in the treatment of critical illness: preserving the internal synchronisation of clocks in different tissues, as well as external synchronisation with the environment. We describe methods for monitoring circadian rhythms in a clinical setting, and how this technology may be used for identifying optimal time windows for interventions, or to alert the physician to a critical deterioration of circadian rhythmicity. We suggest a chronobiological approach to critical illness, involving multicomponent strategies to promote chronofitness (chronobundles), and further investment in the development of personalised, time-based treatment for critically ill patients.
Address Critical Care Unit, Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London, NW3 2QG, UK. daniel.martin@ucl.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1364-8535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29747699 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1897
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Author (up) Van Dycke, K.C.G.; Rodenburg, W.; van Oostrom, C.T.M.; van Kerkhof, L.W.M.; Pennings, J.L.A.; Roenneberg, T.; van Steeg, H.; van der Horst, G.T.J.
Title Chronically Alternating Light Cycles Increase Breast Cancer Risk in Mice Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 25 Issue 14 Pages 1932-1937
Keywords Animals
Abstract Although epidemiological studies in shift workers and flight attendants have associated chronic circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD) with increased breast cancer risk, causal evidence for this association is lacking [1, 2]. Several scenarios have been proposed to contribute to the shift work-cancer connection: (1) internal desynchronization, (2) light at night (resulting in melatonin suppression), (3) sleep disruption, (4) lifestyle disturbances, and (5) decreased vitamin D levels due to lack of sunlight [3]. The confounders inherent in human field studies are less problematic in animal studies, which are therefore a good approach to assess the causal relation between circadian disturbance and cancer. However, the experimental conditions of many of these animal studies were far from the reality of human shift workers. For example, some involved xenografts (addressing tumor growth rather than cancer initiation and/or progression) [4, 5], chemically induced tumor models [6, 7], or continuous bright light exposure, which can lead to suppression of circadian rhythmicity [8, 9]. Here, we have exposed breast cancer-prone p53(R270H(c)/+)WAPCre conditional mutant mice (in a FVB genetic background) to chronic CRD by subjecting them to a weekly alternating light-dark (LD) cycle throughout their life. Animals exposed to the weekly LD inversions showed a decrease in tumor suppression. In addition, these animals showed an increase in body weight. Importantly, this study provides the first experimental proof that CRD increases breast cancer development. Finally, our data suggest internal desynchronization and sleep disturbance as mechanisms linking shift work with cancer development and obesity.
Address Department of Genetics, Center for Biomedical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, the Netherlands. Electronic address: g.vanderhorst@erasmusmc.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26196479 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1221
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