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Author Arderne, C.; Zorn, C.; Nicolas, C.; Koks, E.E.
Title Predictive mapping of the global power system using open data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Data Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Data
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 19
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Limited data on global power infrastructure makes it difficult to respond to challenges in electricity access and climate change. Although high-voltage data on transmission networks are often available, medium- and low-voltage data are often non-existent or unavailable. This presents a challenge for practitioners working on the electricity access agenda, power sector resilience or climate change adaptation. Using state-of-the-art algorithms in geospatial data analysis, we create a first composite map of the global power system with an open license. We find that 97% of the global population lives within 10 km of a MV line, but with large variations between regions and income levels. We show an accuracy of 75% across our validation set of 14 countries, and we demonstrate the value of these data at both a national and regional level. The results from this study pave the way for improved efforts in electricity modelling and planning and are an important step in tackling the Sustainable Development Goals.
Address Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2052-4463 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31941897 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2816
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Author Mard, J.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Mazzoleni, M.
Title Nighttime light data reveal how flood protection shapes human proximity to rivers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Adv
Volume 4 Issue 8 Pages eaar5779
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract To understand the spatiotemporal changes of flood risk, we need to determine the way in which humans adapt and respond to flood events. One adaptation option consists of resettling away from flood-prone areas to prevent or reduce future losses. We use satellite nighttime light data to discern the relationship between long-term changes in human proximity to rivers and the occurrence of catastrophic flood events. Moreover, we explore how these relationships are influenced by different levels of structural flood protection. We found that societies with low protection levels tend to resettle further away from the river after damaging flood events. Conversely, societies with high protection levels show no significant changes in human proximity to rivers. Instead, such societies continue to rely heavily on structural measures, reinforcing flood protection and quickly resettling in flood-prone areas after a flooding event. Our work reveals interesting aspects of human adaptation to flood risk and offers key insights for comparing different risk reduction strategies. In addition, this study provides a framework that can be used to further investigate human response to floods, which is relevant as urbanization of floodplains continues and puts more people and economic assets at risk.
Address IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, 2611 AX Delft, Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30140738; PMCID:PMC6105301 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1989
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Author Kienast, F.; Weiss, M.
Title Wie Lichtemissionen den Schweizer Wald seit 1992 erhellen Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Schweizerische Zeitschrift fur Forstwesen Abbreviated Journal (down) Schweizerische Zeitschrift fur Forstwesen
Volume 170 Issue 1 Pages 18-23
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract How light emissions have been lighting up the Swiss forest since 1992

Light emissions increasingly light up the night sky. Worldwide and in Switzerland, there has been a marked increase over the last 20 to 30 years. This is problematic for biological-ecological and health reasons as well as for cultural reasons. At federal and cantonal level, there are various laws and technical standards governing light emissions. In order to monitor the success of these regulations, it is important to observe night-time brightness over longer periods and within larger areas. In Switzerland, this is done within the framework of the Swiss Landscape Observatory (LABES), which provides time series for night-time observations for the years 1992 to 2012. The present work uses satellite images to investigate the extent to which the Swiss forests are lighted up by nocturnal emissions from surrounding residential areas and infrastructures. It also examines the differences between the forest and open land (meadows, fields and remote areas far away from settlements above the treeline) and how the forested area without any detectable artificial light developed between 1992 and 2012. It is shown that the Swiss forests are more and more lighted up by surrounding light sources. With the exception of the Jura, night-time brightness in forest areas is even higher than in open land, which in the present study is dominated by areas above the treeline. The results can be explained by the relative proximity of the forest to residential areas. On the Plateau the last patch of forest without any detectable artificial light during the night disappeared in 2001, and in the Jura mountains in 2010: in the Alps there are still between 4% (Western Central Alps) and 16% (Southern Alps) forest areas without any detectable artificial light during night time. The last large dark areas are, however, not found in the forested area, but in the areas above the treeline. They should be given adequate protection against illumination, for example with large protection areas (“dark sky parks”).

Wie Lichtemissionen den Schweizer Wald seit 1992 erhellen

Lichtemissionen erhellen den Nachthimmel immer mehr. Weltweit und in der Schweiz ist in den letzten 20 bis 30 Jahren eine starke Zunahme festzustellen. Dies ist sowohl aus biologisch-ökologischen und gesundheitlichen als auch aus kulturellen Gründen problematisch. Auf Bundes- und Kantonsebene gibt es verschiedene Gesetze und technische Normen, welche die Lichtemissionen regeln. Für die Erfolgskontrolle dieser Vorschriften ist es wichtig, die Nachthelligkeit über längere Zeiträume und grössere Gebiete zu beobachten. Dies geschieht in der Schweiz im Rahmen der Landschaftsbeobachtung Schweiz (LABES), die für die Jahre 1992 bis 2012 Zeitserien zur Nachthelligkeit zur Verfügung stellt. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird anhand von Satellitenbildern untersucht, wie stark der Schweizer Wald durch Lichtemissionen der umliegenden Siedlungen und Infrastrukturen aufgehellt wird, welche Unterschiede zum Offenland (Wiesen, Felder und siedlungsferne Gebiete über der Waldgrenze) bestehen und wie sich die Fläche des nachtdunklen Waldes zwischen 1992 und 2012 entwickelt hat. Es zeigt sich, dass die Schweizer Wälder zunehmend durch umliegende Lichtquellen aufgehellt sind. Mit Ausnahme des Juras ist die Nachthelligkeit in Waldgebieten sogar höher als im Offenland, das in der vorliegenden Untersuchung flächenmässig durch die Gebiete über der Waldgrenze dominiert wird. Die Resultate können mit der relativen Siedlungsnähe des Waldes erklärt werden. Während es im Mittelland ab 2001 und im Jura ab 2010 keine nachtdunklen Waldflächen mehr gibt, findet man in den Alpen je nach Region noch zwischen 4% (westliche Zentralalpen) und 16% (Alpensüdflanke) völlig nachtdunkle Waldflächen, d.h. Waldflächen ohne menschlichen Lichteinfluss. Die letzten grossen, völlig nachtdunklen Flächen liegen aber nicht im Waldareal, sondern in den Gebieten über der Waldgrenze. Sie sollten gegen Aufhellung besonders geschützt werden, zum Beispiel mit grossflächigen Schutzgebieten («dark sky parks»).

Comment les émissions lumineuses éclairent la forêt suisse depuis 1992

Le ciel nocturne est de plus en plus éclairé par les émissions lumineuses. On constate dans le monde entier et en Suisse une forte progression des émissions lumineuses ces dernières 20 à 30 années. Ceci est problématique aussi bien pour des raisons bioécologiques et sanitaires que culturelles. Différentes lois et normes techniques, aux niveaux de la Confédération et des cantons, règlent les émissions lumineuses. Il est important d'observer la clarté nocturne sur de longues périodes et de larges régions afin de contrôler le succès de ces mesures. Ceci est réalisé dans le cadre de l'Observation du paysage suisse (OPS) qui met à disposition des séries de données sur les émissions lumineuses pour les années 1992 à 2012. Ce travail examine à l'aide d'images satellites à quel point la forêt suisse est éclairée par les émissions lumineuses nocturnes issues des zones habitées et des infrastructures environnantes, les différences existantes avec les zones ouvertes (prés, champs et zones éloignées des habitats au-delà de la forêt) et comment se sont développées les surfaces nocturnes sombres de la forêt entre 1992 et 2012. Il est démontré que les forêts suisses sont de plus en plus éclairées par les sources lumineuses environnantes. A l'exception du Jura, la clarté nocturne est même plus importante en forêt que dans les surfaces ouvertes, qui dans cette étude sont essentiellement composées de surfaces au-delà de la forêt. Les résultats peuvent être expliqués par la proximité de la forêt avec les zones habitées. Alors qu'il n'existe plus de surfaces forestières sombres la nuit depuis 2001 sur le Plateau et 2010 dans le Jura, il existe encore dans les Alpes selon la région, 4% (Alpes centrales occidentales) et 16% (versant sud des Alpes), de surfaces forestières sombres durant la nuit, c'est à dire des surfaces forestières sans influence lumineuse anthropogénique. Les dernières grandes surfaces totalement sombres durant la nuit ne se situent toutefois pas en forêt, mais au-delà de la forêt. Elles devraient être protégées contre les émissions lumineuses, par exemple avec des grandes réserves («dark sky parks»).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-7818 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2165
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Author Horrace, W.C.; Rohlin, S.M.
Title How Dark Is Dark? Bright Lights, Big City, Racial Profiling Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal (down) Review of Economics and Statistics
Volume 98 Issue 2 Pages 226-232
Keywords Psychology; Public Safety; Society
Abstract Grogger and Ridgeway (2006) use the daylight saving time shift to develop a police racial profiling test that is based on differences in driver race visibility and (hence) the race distribution of traffic stops across daylight and darkness. However, urban environments may be well lit at night, eroding the power of their test. We refine their test using streetlight location data in Syracuse, New York, and the results change in the direction of finding profiling of black drivers. Our preferred specification suggests that the odds of a black driver being stopped (relative to nonblack drivers) increase 15% in daylight compared to darkness.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2167
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Author Déjardin, G.
Title The Light of the Night Sky Type Journal Article
Year 1936 Publication Reviews of Modern Physics Abbreviated Journal (down) Rev. Mod. Phys.
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 1-21
Keywords Skyglow; Review
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-6861 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2405
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