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Author Shillo, R., & Halevy, A. H. url  openurl
  Title Interaction of photoperiod and temperature in flowering-control of Gypsophila paniculata L Type Journal Article
  Year 1982 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 385-393  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Long day promotes flowering of Gysophila paniculata L cultivar ‘Bristol Fairy’. Repeated treatments with GA3 or GA4 + 7 in short days did not promote flowering. The long photoperiod is effective only at relatively high temperatures. At night temperatures below 12°C, the plants remain vegetative even in long days. Efficient artificial lighting is from incandescent lamps at 60–100 lux. Fluorescent lighting (Cool-White) is not effective. Lighting of 4 hours as a night-break or at the end of the night were equally effective, but 4 hours lighting as a day-extension was less effective. Whole-night lighting promoted flowering more than any of the 4-hour lighting regimes. Cyclic lighting of one third light in each cycle promoted flowering to the same extent as continuous lighting. Light intensity during the day has a decisive effect on flower production.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2370  
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Author Tinus, R. W. url  openurl
  Title Effects of Extended Photoperiod on Southern Rocky Mountain Engelmann Spruce and Douglas-fir Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Tree Planters' Notes Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Four sources of Engelmann spruce and two of Douglas-fir were grown under eight different extended photoperiod regimes. Incandescent light 1 minute of every 15 at night at 270 lux was more effective than continuous incandescent at 1200 lux or intermittent fluorescent at 950 lux at preventing bud dormancy and maintaining continuous height growth.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2368  
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Author Lawrence, B.K.; Fehr, W.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reproductive Response of Soybeans to Night Interruption1 Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Crop Science Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 755  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Artificial lights may be used to delay flowering of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. Previous research has suggested that night interruption imposed every other night would delay flowering as much as every-night interruption. Our objective was to evaluate the reproductive development of cultivars when exposed to night interruption every night compared with exposure every other night. One cultivar of each Maturity Group 00 through V was grown in the field at Ames, Iowa during 1978 and 1979. The four light treatments imposed every night or every other night included illumination with incandescent light from sunset to sunrise, 2300 to 0030 hours, 0030 to 0200 hours, or 0200 to 0330 hours. Control plots were not exposed to artificial light.

The average number of days that reproductive development was delayed beyond the control was twice as great for the every-night treatments as for the every-other-night treatments. Illumination from sunset to sunrise delayed reproductive development significantly more than the treatments of night interruption for 1.5 hours. Night interruption near the end of the dark period (0200 to 0330 hours) delayed reproductive development more than the earlier interruptions.

The results did not support the hypothesis that light treatments every other night would delay reproductive development as much as every-night interruptions. The lighting regime needed to delay reproductive development will depend on the photoperiod requirements of the cultivars and duration of the delay that is desired.
 
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  ISSN 0011-183X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2367  
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Author Teare, S. W. openurl 
  Title The night sky brightness at Mount Wilson Observatory Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication The Observatory Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 120 Issue Pages 313-317  
  Keywords Skyglow  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2001  
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Author Ahn, H.; Lee, S.; Jo, E. openurl 
  Title Assessment on Lighting Management Zones for Light pollution in Gwangju Metropolitan City Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication 한국태양에너지학회 학술대회논문집 Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Planning  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1960  
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