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Author Skinner, N., & Bullough, J. doi  openurl
  Title Influence of LED Spectral Characteristics on Glare Recovery Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2019-01-0845 Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Vision; Lighting; Public Safety  
  Abstract Headlight glare is a major concern of the driving public. In the past couple of years there have been concerns expressed about the use of light emitting diode (LED) lighting technologies and possible impacts LEDs may have on people, including circadian disruption, retinal hazards, and glare. Under typical use cases, vehicle headlight exposures are insufficient to cause circadian disruption or retinal damage, but can result in disability and discomfort glare, as well as glare recovery. In general, white LEDs used for illumination have greater short-wavelength content than halogen lamps used in many headlights, and short wavelengths have been implicated in visual discomfort from bright lights at night. Previous literature is inconsistent regarding whether the spectral (color) content of a glare source affects the amount of recovery time needed to see objects, following exposure to a bright light such as a vehicle headlight. Warm and cool white LEDs were used as glare sources in the present study. They were energized and exposed to study participants at one of two illuminances (low, high) for either 3 or 6 seconds, after which participants were asked to identify the orientation of a Landolt ring target located on a display screen behind the glare source. Identification times were unaffected by the spectral content of the LED, but were correlated with the “dosage” of light from the glare sources, defined as the product of illuminance and duration. Although cool white LEDs will tend to be judged as creating more discomfort than warm white LEDs, they do not result in longer glare recovery times under the range of conditions used in this study.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2299  
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Author Sierro, A., & Erhardt, A. doi  openurl
  Title Light pollution hampers recolonization of revitalised European Nightjar habitats in the Valais (Swiss Alps) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Ornithology Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 160 Issue 3 Pages 749–761  
  Keywords Animals; Conservation; Birds; Caprimulgus europaeus; Conservation measures; Moth availability; Nocturnal adaptation  
  Abstract Increasing light emissions caused by human activities have been recognized as a major threat for nocturnal animals. In Switzerland, the European Nightjar is a rare bird, decreasing in numbers since the 1970s, and is therefore highly threatened. The last breeding population occurs in the canton Valais. Initial expert-based conservation measures on formerly inhabited breeding sites were successful until 2000, however recent additional measures have failed. Nightjars are highly sensitive to light due to their special retina adapted to living in semi-darkness. We hypothesized that food availability, mainly moths, is not a critical limiting factor, but that artificial light emissions prevent successful foraging as well as recolonizing revitalised breeding habitats of the nightjar. To test this hypothesis, we used light trapping data of moths from the last 30 years to evaluate food availability and compared light emission on abandoned versus still-occupied breeding sites. Abundance of larger moths did not change significantly over the last 30 years, and smaller moths even increased in abandoned as well as in still-occupied nightjar habitats. However, light emission was two to five times higher in abandoned compared to still-occupied sites. These results suggest that increasing light emission during recent decades has exceeded tolerable levels for this highly specialized night bird. Authorities of the canton Valais should therefore order a reduction in light emission near nightjar habitats by replacing bulbs currently in use with customized LED or broad-spectrum lamps low in white and blue light, and assign remaining nightjar habitats as areas of complete nocturnal darkness, thereby also protecting other threatened nocturnal animals, including moths.  
  Address Conservation Nature and Paysage, Sierre, Switzerland; antoine(at)naturarks.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2300  
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Author Omar, N. S., & Ismal, A. doi  openurl
  Title Night Lights and Economic Performance in Egypt Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Advances in Economics and Business Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 69-81  
  Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper, to the best of my knowledge, is the first to estimate the association between Nighttime Lights (NTL) and real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at the national level, using sub-national GDP data for the 27 Egyptian governorates over FY08-FY13. The study finds that NTL has a positive and statistically significant

correlation with GDP at the sub-national and national levels. Hence, NTL can measure and predict GDP in Egypt, at the national and sub-national levels. These findings affirm most previous research that NTL could be a good proxy for GDP when official data are unavailable or time infrequent in developing countries.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2301  
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Author Straka,T. M., Wolf, M., Gras, P., Buchholz, S., & Voigt, C. C. doi  openurl
  Title Tree Cover Mediates the Effect of Artificial Light on Urban Bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 91  
  Keywords Animals; ALAN; bats; canopy cover; chiroptera; light-emitting diodes; LED; trees; Ultraviolet; urban  
  Abstract With urban areas growing worldwide, so does artificial light at night (ALAN) which negatively affects many nocturnal animals, including bats. The response of bats to ALAN ranges from some opportunistic species taking advantage of insect aggregations around street lamps, particularly those emitting ultraviolet (UV) light, to others avoiding lit areas at all. Tree cover has been suggested to mitigate the negative effects of ALAN on bats by shielding areas against light scatter. Here, we investigated the effect of tree cover on the relationship between ALAN and bats in Berlin, Germany. In particular, we asked if this interaction varies with the UV light spectrum of street lamps and also across urban bat species. We expected trees next to street lamps to block ALAN, making the adjacent habitat more suitable for all species, irrespective of the wavelength spectrum of the light source. Additionally, we expected UV emitting lights next to trees to attract insects and thus, opportunistic bats. In summer 2017, we recorded bat activity at 22 green open spaces in Berlin using automated ultrasonic detectors. We analyzed bat activity patterns and landscape variables (number of street lamps with and without UV light emission, an estimate of light pollution, and tree cover density around each recording site within different spatial scales) using generalized linear mixed-effects models with a negative binomial distribution. We found a species-specific response of bats to street lamps with and without UV light, providing a more detailed picture of ALAN impacts than simply total light radiance. Moreover, we found that dense tree cover dampened the negative effect of street lamps without UV for open-space foraging bats of the genera Nyctalus, Eptesicus, and Vespertilio, yet it amplified the already existing negative or positive effect of street lamps with or without UV on Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus, and Myotis spp. Our study underpins the importance of minimizing artificial light at night close to vegetation, particularly for bats adapted to spatial complexity in the environment (i.e., clutter-adapted species), and to increase dense vegetation in urban landscape to provide, besides roosting opportunities, protection against ALAN for open-space foraging bats in city landscapes.  
  Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2302  
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Author Babaii, A., Adib-Hajbaghery, M., & Hajibagheri, A. doi  openurl
  Title Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Nursing and Midwifery Studies Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND:

Patients in coronary care unit are at risk of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can be associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate, raising the risk of developing cardiovascular problems among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit.

OBJECTIVES:

This study was carried out to examine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in cardiac patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected using a convenient sampling method and randomly allocated into the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. However, in the experimental group, patients received routine care and eye mask for three subsequent nights. In the both groups, the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests.

RESULTS:

After the study, the median scores of the subjective sleep quality, the sleep latency, the sleep duration, the habitual sleep efficiency, and the sleep disturbances domains, as well as the median score of overall Pittsburgh sleep quality index in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the use of sleep medications and the daytime dysfunction domains (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Using eye mask can significantly improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients. Therefore, nurses are recommended to use eye mask in combination with current treatments for improving patients' sleep quality.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2303  
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