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Author Huang, X., Wang, C., & Lu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Understanding Spatiotemporal Development of Human Settlement in Hurricane-prone Areas on U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts using Nighttime Remote Sensing Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-22  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; hurricanes; cyclones; Weather; natural disasters; DMSP-OLS; nighttime light; night lights; vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index; VANUI  
  Abstract Hurricanes, as one of the most devastating natural disasters, have posed great threats to people in coastal areas. A better understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of human settlement in hurricane-prone areas is demanded for sustainable development. This study uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime light (NTL) data sets from 1992 to 2013 to examine human settlement development in areas with different levels of hurricane proneness. The DMSP/OLS NTL data from six satellites were intercalibrated and desaturated with AVHRR and MODIS optical imagery to derive the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI), a popular index that quantifies human settlement intensity. The derived VANUI time series was examined with the Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen test to identify significant spatiotemporal trends. To link the VANUI product to hurricane impacts, four hurricane-prone zones were extracted to represent different levels of hurricane proneness. Aside from geographic division, a wind-speed weighted track density function was developed and applied to historical North Atlantic Basin (NAB)-origin storm tracks to better categorize the four levels of hurricane proneness. Spatiotemporal patterns of human settlement in the four zones were finally analyzed. The results clearly exhibit a north-south and inland-coastal discrepancy of human settlement dynamics. This study also reveals that both the zonal extent and zonal increase rate of human settlement positively correlate with hurricane proneness levels. The intensified human settlement in high hurricane-exposure zones deserves further attention for coastal resilience.  
  Address Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, 29208, U.S.A  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2519  
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Author Tuttle, B. T., Anderson, S. J., Sutton, P. C., Elvidge, C. D., & Baugh, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title It Used To Be Dark Here Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 3 Issue 11 Pages 287-297  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime satellite imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to observe nocturnal light emissions from sources including cities, wild fires, and gas flares. Data from the DMSP OLS is used in a wide range of studies including mapping urban areas, estimating informal economies, and estimations of population. Given the extensive and increasing list of applications a repeatable method for assessing geolocation accuracy would be beneficial. An array of portable lights was designed and taken to multiple field sites known to have no other light sources. The lights were operated during nighttime overpasses by the DMSP OLS and observed in the imagery. An assessment of the geolocation accuracy was performed by measuring the distance between the GPS measured location of the lights and the observed location in the imagery. A systematic shift was observed and the mean distance was measured at 2.9 km.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2520  
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Author Garstang, R.H. url  openurl
  Title Dust and Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication The Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 103 Issue Pages 1109-1116  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract We have refined our model for the prediction ofthe brightness ofthe night sky due to man-made light pollution by the addition of an ozone layer, by the use ofa more accurate representation ofthe atmospheric molecular density variation as a function ofheight, and by using a better mathematical representation ofthe scattering angular function of aerosols. Each ofthese modifications leads to a small reduction in the predicted brightness ofthe night sky. We have also added to our model a thin layer ofdust ofarbitrary optical thickness and height above sea level. We have studied dust clouds at various heights and ofvarious optical thicknesses. Most ofour calculations have been performed for Kitt Peak National Observatory. Most calculations have used scattering and absorption coefficients appropriate for volcanic clouds; a few calculations refer to desert dust. Light pollution is reduced by a dust cloud ofmoderate density whose altitude is below about 10 km (for the V band) and increased for dust clouds at greater altitudes. Observations from good sites are not likely to be greatly affected by the increases in light pollution caused by volcanic clouds at altitudes oforder 20 km.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2523  
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Author Wallace, A. R. openurl 
  Title The Malay Archipelago the land of the orang-utan and the bird of paradise: a narrative of travel, with studies of man and nature Type Journal Article
  Year 1869 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Moths  
  Abstract Excerpt: “As soon as it got dark I placed my lamp on a table against the wall, and with pins, insect-forceps, net, and collecting boxes by my side, sat down with a book. Sometimes during the whole evening only one solitary moth would visit me, while on other nights they would pour in, in a continual stream, keeping me hard at work catching and pinning till past midnight.”  
  Address  
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  Publisher Macmillan and Co Place of Publication London Editor  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2524  
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Author Sloane, M.; Slater, D.; Entwistle, J. openurl 
  Title Tackling Social Inequalities in Public Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Society  
  Abstract 2This report is based on research findings of the Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme (CL) based at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), as well as on discussions of the Configuring Light expert working group. Consisting of high-profile experts and stakeholders in the fields of design, planning and policy-making, this group was established by CL to develop a new agenda for tackling social inequalities in public lighting. Members of the working group are listed at the end of this document.This project was run by the LSE-based Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme and funded by LSE Knowledge Exchange and Impact funding.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author London School of Economics Thesis  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2528  
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