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Author Xia, C.; Yeh, A.G.-O.; Zhang, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analyzing spatial relationships between urban land use intensity and urban vitality at street block level: A case study of five Chinese megacities Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning  
  Volume 193 Issue Pages 103669  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (down) Urban sprawl in urbanizing China has resulted in a series of ecological and environmental problems. Urban planners have been committed to promoting compact development through high-density and mixed land use. However, a problem brought by such compact urban form is the mismatch between physical spaces and socio-economic activities. To date, minimal research has been conducted using spatial statistics to study this issue at the local scales. Moreover, urban night-time vitality has been consistently ignored in existing studies. In the current work, urban land use intensity was analyzed on the basis of street block density and typology, and urban daytime and night-time vitality were measured using small catering business and night-time light data, respectively. The spatial relationships between urban land use intensity and urban vitality were investigated using a local indicator of spatial association (LISA), and five megacities in China were taken as a case study to examine whether variations exist between different cities. Results showed a significant positive spatial autocorrelation between urban land use intensity and urban vitality according to global statistics. Therefore, socio-economic activities are more likely to be abundant in densely developed urban areas. However, local spatial mismatches were found in the five megacities, indicating overcrowded or underutilized urban spaces in all the cities. These relationships were associated with different urban areas (urbanized before 1995 and during 1995–2015), land use conditions (function and mixture) and time periods (day and night). The results of this work will provide a comprehensive understanding of compact city and sustainability.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2697  
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Author Welch, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring urban population and energy utilization patterns from satellite Data Type Journal Article
  Year 1980 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (down) Urban population trends in China and energy utilization patterns in the United States have been assessed from LANDSAT and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) images. Regression models developed from population (P) data and urban area (A) measurements on LANDSAT images are of the form P = αAb and provide insights into the success of Chinese urban planning policies for cities with populations of 500,000 to 2,000,000 people. Studies of the relationships between population, urban area, and electric-energy utilization patterns have been conducted from DMSP images of the United States. Microdensitometer profiles of illuminated cities recorded on nighttime (visual band) images are used in combination with the map boundaries of the built-up areas to create unique three-dimensional representations of the urban centers. The volumes of these three-dimensional figures may be computed and plotted with respect to population and/or energy utilization data to model regional patterns of use. Improvements in the quality of sensor data should increase the potential for monitoring urban energy demands and populations.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2382  
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Author Kazemidemneh, M.; Mahdavinejad, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of Space Syntax Technique to Improve the Quality of Lighting and Modify Energy Consumption Patterns in Urban Spaces Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Sustainable Development Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 29-40  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract (down) Urban lighting is one of the significant issues that urban designers and architects are facing, and it has received a special attention in recent years. Urban lighting pursues critical goals such as preserving the livability of the city during nighttime, providing a sense of security, maintaining the city‟s readability, etc. Use of incompatible patterns for lighting design wastes significant amount of energy annually. A master lighting plan for urban areas should be recommended to achieve these goals and prevent wasteful energy use in lighting. One of the solutions for designing an appropriate plan is to notice the pedestrian traffic pattern in the city by considering space syntax model and integration maps analysis. In this research, one of Tehran‟s regions has been chosen and its integration map has been generated using appropriate software. Tehran is selected as case study of this research while the results might be applied in other similar cities especially in developing countries. First, based on the integration degree of the passages which reveals pedestrian traffic pattern and considering recommended illuminance standards, the average required lighting has been determined. Second, comparing the measured lighting intensity and the standard amounts reveals the correlation between the presented urban lighting and energy consumption model. Eventually, different solutions for appropriate urban lighting design based on acceptable energy consumption patterns have been suggested.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2096  
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Author Li, M.; Koks, E.; Taubenböck, H.; van Vliet, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Continental-scale mapping and analysis of 3D building structure Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 245 Issue Pages 111859  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (down) Urban land use is often characterized based on the presence of built-up land, while the land use intensity of different locations is ignored. This narrow focus is at least partially due to a lack of data on the vertical dimension of urban land. The potential of Earth observation data to fill this gap has already been shown, but this has not yet been applied at large spatial scales. This study aims to map urban 3D building structure, i.e. building footprint, height, and volume, for Europe, the US, and China using random forest models. Our models perform well, as indicated by R2 values of 0.90 for building footprint, 0.81 for building height, and 0.88 for building volume, for all three case regions combined. In our multidimensional input variables, we find that built-up density derived from the Global Urban Footprint (GUF) is the most important variable for estimating building footprint, while backscatter intensity of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the most important variable for estimating building height. A combination of the two is essential to estimate building volume. Our analysis further highlights the heterogeneity of 3D building structure across space. Specifically, buildings in China tend to be taller on average (10.35 m) compared to Europe (7.37 m) and the US (6.69 m). At the same time, the building volume per capita in China is lowest, with 302.3 m3 per capita, while Europe and the US show estimates of 404.6 m3 and 565.4 m3, respectively. The results of this study (3D building structure data for Europe, the US, and China) are publicly available, and can be used for further analysis of urban environment, spatial planning, and land use projections.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2918  
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Author Manoli, G.; Fatichi, S.; Schlapfer, M.; Yu, K.; Crowther, T.W.; Meili, N.; Burlando, P.; Katul, G.G.; Bou-Zeid, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Magnitude of urban heat islands largely explained by climate and population Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 573 Issue 7772 Pages 55-60  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (down) Urban heat islands (UHIs) exacerbate the risk of heat-related mortality associated with global climate change. The intensity of UHIs varies with population size and mean annual precipitation, but a unifying explanation for this variation is lacking, and there are no geographically targeted guidelines for heat mitigation. Here we analyse summertime differences between urban and rural surface temperatures (DeltaTs) worldwide and find a nonlinear increase in DeltaTs with precipitation that is controlled by water or energy limitations on evapotranspiration and that modulates the scaling of DeltaTs with city size. We introduce a coarse-grained model that links population, background climate, and UHI intensity, and show that urban-rural differences in evapotranspiration and convection efficiency are the main determinants of warming. The direct implication of these nonlinearities is that mitigation strategies aimed at increasing green cover and albedo are more efficient in dry regions, whereas the challenge of cooling tropical cities will require innovative solutions.  
  Address Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31485056 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2669  
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