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Author Chen, H.; Xiong, X.; Geng, X.; Twedt, K.
Title Stray-light correction and prediction for Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership visible infrared imaging radiometer suite day-night band Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Rem. Sens.
Volume 13 Issue 02 Pages 1
Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership visible infrared imaging radiometer suite instrument has successfully operated since its launch in October 2011. Stray-light contamination is much larger than prelaunch expectations, and it causes a major decrease in quality of the day-night band night imagery when the spacecraft is crossing the Northern or Southern day-night terminators. The stray light can be operationally estimated using Earth-view data that are measured over dark surfaces during the new moon each month. More than 7 years of nighttime images have demonstrated that the stray-light contamination mainly depends on the Earth–Sun–spacecraft geometry, so its intensity is generally estimated as a function of the satellite zenith angle. In practice, stray-light contamination is also detector- and scan-angle-dependent. Previous methods of stray-light prediction generally rely on using the known stray light level from the same month in the previous year, when the Earth–Sun–spacecraft geometries had been similar. We propose a new method to predict stray-light contamination. The Kullback–Leibler similarity metric is used as a method to combine data from multiple years with appropriate adjustments for degradation and geometry drifts in order to calculate a fused stray-light contamination correction. The new method provides an improved prediction of stray-light contamination compared to the existing methods and may be considered for future use in the real-time NASA Level-1B products.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1931-3195 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2517
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Author Jiang, W.; He, G.; Long, T.; Guo, H.; Yin, R.; Leng, W.; Liu, H.; Wang, G.
Title Potentiality of Using Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Imagery to Investigate Artificial Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Sensors Abbreviated Journal Sensors
Volume 18 Issue 9 Pages 2900
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract (down) The successful launch of Luojia 1-01 complements the existing nighttime light data with a high spatial resolution of 130 m. This paper is the first study to assess the potential of using Luojia 1-01 nighttime light imagery for investigating artificial light pollution. Eight Luojia 1-01 images were selected to conduct geometric correction. Then, the ability of Luojia 1-01 to detect artificial light pollution was assessed from three aspects, including the comparison between Luojia 1-01 and the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS), the source of artificial light pollution and the patterns of urban light pollution. Moreover, the advantages and limitations of Luojia 1-01 were discussed. The results showed the following: (1) Luojia 1-01 can detect a higher dynamic range and capture the finer spatial details of artificial nighttime light. (2) The averages of the artificial light brightness were different between various land use types. The brightness of the artificial light pollution of airports, streets, and commercial services is high, while dark areas include farmland and rivers. (3) The light pollution patterns of four cities decreased away from the urban core and the total light pollution is highly related to the economic development. Our findings confirm that Luojia 1-01 can be effectively used to investigate artificial light pollution. Some limitations of Luojia 1-01, including its spectral range, radiometric calibration and the effects of clouds and moonlight, should be researched in future studies.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1997
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Author Deng, J., Che, T., Xiao, C., Wang, S., Dai, L., & Meerzhan, A.
Title Suitability Analysis of Ski Areas in China: An Integrated Study Based on Natural and Socioeconomic Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Cryosphere Abbreviated Journal The Cryosphere
Volume 13 Issue Pages 2149–2167
Keywords Remote Sensing; China; Skiing; winter sports; GIS; Asia
Abstract (down) The successful bidding of the 2022 Winter Olympics (Beijing 2022, officially known as the XXIV Olympic Winter Games) has greatly stimulated Chinese enthusiasm to participate in winter sports. Consequently, the Chinese ski industry is rapidly booming driven by enormous market demand and government support. However, investing in ski area at an unreasonable location will cause problems both from economic perspective (in terms of operation and management) as well as geographical concerns (such as environmental degradation). To evaluate the suitability of a ski area based on scientific 20 metrics has since become a prerequisite to the sustainable development of ski industry. In this study, we evaluate the locational suitability of ski areas in China by integrating their natural and socioeconomic conditions using linear weighted method based on geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis combined with remote sensing, online and field survey data. Key indexes for evaluating the natural suitability include snow cover, air temperature, topographic conditions, groundwater, and vegetation, whereas socioeconomic suitability is evaluated based on economic conditions, accessibility of transportation, 25 distance to tourist attractions, and distance to cities. As such, an integrated metrics considering both natural and socioeconomic suitability is defined to be a threshold and used to identify the suitability of a candidate region for ski area development. The results show that 92% of existing ski areas are located in areas with an integrated index greater than 0.5. In contrary, a ski area is considered to be a dismal prospect when the locational integrated index is less than 0.5. Finally, corresponding development strategies for decision-makers are proposed based on the multi-criteria metrics, which will be extended to incorporate potential influences from future climate change and socioeconomic development.
Address Heihe Remote Sensing Experimental Research Station, Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing of Gansu Province, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China; chetao(at)lzb.ac.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Copernicus Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2522
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Author Davidovic, M.; Djokic, L.; Cabarkapa, A.; Kostic, M.
Title Warm white versus neutral white LED street lighting: Pedestrians' impressions Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume in press Issue Pages 147715351880429
Keywords Psychology; Security
Abstract (down) The subjective impressions of pedestrians are necessary in order to decide on the appropriate colour of light to be used for street lighting. Therefore, a pilot project aimed to compare subjective evaluations of the sidewalk illumination under two street lighting installations, realised by LEDs of 3000 K (warm white) and 4000 K (neutral white), was recently conducted in Belgrade. Both installations had comparable sidewalk illuminances as well as other relevant photometric parameters. The evaluation was done through a questionnaire. A group of 139 (61 male and 78 female) respondents, all of them university students, was asked to grade both lighting installations for the sidewalk light intensity, the appearance of human faces, the colour of light and the colour rendering as well as the overall impression. According to the median values, the 3000 K LED installation was considered better than the 4000 K installation for all aspects assessed as well as the overall impression. Although the survey results convincingly showed a preference for 3000 K LEDs for this comparison, additional research is needed using a more representative sample of people and a wider range of locations before a definite conclusion can be reached.
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ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2045
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Author Dick, R.
Title The Biological Basis for the Canadian Guideline for Outdoor Lighting 1. General Scotobiology Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Abbreviated Journal
Volume 114 Issue 3 Pages 122-126
Keywords Biology; Ecology
Abstract (down) The subject of limiting outdoor lighting seems straightforward- it saves electricity and reduces glare, but society has a predilection for activity at night that requires more than natural light. This extends beyond urban areas. “Cottage country” is well lit along the shoreline, and even campgrounds filled with amateur astronomers have lots of unshielded lights. Although these tend to be red, they still undermine our night vision (Dick, 2016) and change the nocturnal ambience. The main problem of whether outdoor lighting is good or bad depends on who is judge. Is there a less equivocal way to assess or define acceptable outdoor lighting, especially in rural areas? Must rural lighting follow “Best Practices” for cities? This is the first in a series of papers that will discuss the science behind the ecological impacts of artificial (anthropogenic) light at night. It will propose rational solutions to reduce these impacts and will define the characteristics of artificial light that minimize these disruptions that we call lighting with “low-ecological impact.” Although taking an ecological approach to outdoor lighting is unusual, we have observed that if the nocturnal environment is preserved for wildlife, it is usually sufficient for astronomy. Although it is understood that observatories may require a curfew during the three weeks centred on the new Moon. This first paper will set the stage for this somewhat unorthodox exploration into light.
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2945
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