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Author Levin, N.; Ali, S.; Crandall, D.; Kark, S.
Title World Heritage in danger: Big data and remote sensing can help protect sites in conflict zones Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Global Environmental Change Abbreviated Journal Global Environmental Change
Volume 55 Issue Pages 97-104
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) World Heritage sites provide a key mechanism for protecting areas of universal importance. However, fifty-four UNESCO sites are currently listed as “In Danger”, with 40% of these located in the Middle East. Since 2010 alone, thirty new sites were identified as under risk globally. We combined big-data and remote sensing to examine whether they can effectively be used to identify danger to World Heritage in near real-time. We found that armed-conflicts substantially threaten both natural- and cultural-heritage listed sites. Other major risks include poor management and development (globally), poaching (Africa mostly) and deforestation (tropics), yet conflict is the most prominent threat. We show that news-mining of big-data on conflicts and remote sensing of nights-lights enabled us to identify conflict afflicted areas in near real-time. These findings provide a crucial avenue for developing a global transparent early-warning system before irreversible damage to world heritage takes place.
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ISSN 0959-3780 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2279
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Author Xiao, D.; Lu, L.; Wang, X.; Nitivattananon, V.; Guo, H.; Hui, W.
Title An urbanization monitoring dataset for world cultural heritage in the Belt and Road region Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Big Earth Data Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) World cultural heritage refers to properties recognized as having historical, social, and anthropological value. Global urbanization has changed the land cover, land use, transportation, landscape, and local environment in cities, and thus exposed World Heritage sites to risks induced by direct or indirect damaging factors. In this paper, an urbanization intensity index (UII) was developed to quantitatively measure urban dynamics in the vicinity of World Heritage sites. This index is based on three global Earth observation datasets, including a global human settlement layer, a global population grid product, and a global nighttime light imagery. Large UII values represent high urbanization levels and intensive human activities in the study area and vice versa. The assessment results show that the mean UII value at 79 world cultural heritage sites in the Belt and Road region increased from 0.26 in 2000 to 0.29 in 2015. The heritage sites were then classified into four types based on the change rates of UIIs. A total of seven heritage sites were identified as exposed to risks due to urban sprawl and infrastructure expansion. The UII dataset can be combined with UNESCO’s periodic reports and site-specific data to provide valuable information for international communities to develop heritage preservation policies. The dataset is available at http://www.dx.doi.org/10.11922/sciencedb.980.
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Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3322
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Author Rea, M.; Skinner, N.; Bullough, J.
Title A Novel Barricade Warning Light System Using Wireless Communications Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2018-01-5036 Abbreviated Journal
Volume In press Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting; Safety
Abstract (down) Workers in construction and transportation sectors are at increased risk for work-related injuries and fatalities by nearby traffic. Barricade-mounted warning lights meeting current specifications do not always provide consistent and adequate visual guidance to drivers and can contribute to glare and reduced safety. Through an implementation of sensors and wireless communications, a novel, intelligent set of warning lights and a tablet-based interface were developed. The lights modulate between 100% and 10% of maximum intensity rather than between 100% and off in order to improve visual guidance and adjust their overall intensity based on ambient conditions. The lights can be synchronized or operated in sequential flash patterns at any frequency between 1 and 4 Hz, and sequential patterns automatically update based on global positioning satellite (GPS) locations displayed in the control interface. A successful field demonstration of the system verified that its functions were viewed favorably by transportation safety personnel.
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Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2117
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Author Carley J. S., Grabarczyk, E. E., Vonhof, M. J., & Gill, S. A.
Title Social factors, not anthropogenic noise or artificial light, influence onset of dawn singing in a common songbird Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Auk: Ornithological Advances Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) With worldwide increases in artificial light and anthropogenic noise, understanding how these pollutants influence animals allows us to better mitigate potential negative effects. Both light and noise affect the timing of daily activities, including the onset of dawn song in birds, yet the influence of these pollutants compared with social factors that also influence song onset remains unknown. We investigated the onset of dawn song, testing hypotheses aimed at understanding the influences of light and noise pollution as well as male competition, pairing status, and breeding stage on timing of dawn singing by male House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Overall, models with social factors fit song onset data better than models with abiotic factors of noise and sky glow, and the highest ranking model included nesting stage, number of male neighbors, and temperature. Males began singing earlier when they were building nests and when mates were fertile than during later nesting stages. Males also sang earlier as the number of male neighbors increased. The timing of dawn song by male House Wrens appeared unaffected by day-to-day variation in light and noise pollution, with social factors having larger effects on the onset of daily behavior in this species.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2643
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Author Straka,T. M., Wolf, M., Gras, P., Buchholz, S., & Voigt, C. C.
Title Tree Cover Mediates the Effect of Artificial Light on Urban Bats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue Pages 91
Keywords Animals; ALAN; bats; canopy cover; chiroptera; light-emitting diodes; LED; trees; Ultraviolet; urban
Abstract (down) With urban areas growing worldwide, so does artificial light at night (ALAN) which negatively affects many nocturnal animals, including bats. The response of bats to ALAN ranges from some opportunistic species taking advantage of insect aggregations around street lamps, particularly those emitting ultraviolet (UV) light, to others avoiding lit areas at all. Tree cover has been suggested to mitigate the negative effects of ALAN on bats by shielding areas against light scatter. Here, we investigated the effect of tree cover on the relationship between ALAN and bats in Berlin, Germany. In particular, we asked if this interaction varies with the UV light spectrum of street lamps and also across urban bat species. We expected trees next to street lamps to block ALAN, making the adjacent habitat more suitable for all species, irrespective of the wavelength spectrum of the light source. Additionally, we expected UV emitting lights next to trees to attract insects and thus, opportunistic bats. In summer 2017, we recorded bat activity at 22 green open spaces in Berlin using automated ultrasonic detectors. We analyzed bat activity patterns and landscape variables (number of street lamps with and without UV light emission, an estimate of light pollution, and tree cover density around each recording site within different spatial scales) using generalized linear mixed-effects models with a negative binomial distribution. We found a species-specific response of bats to street lamps with and without UV light, providing a more detailed picture of ALAN impacts than simply total light radiance. Moreover, we found that dense tree cover dampened the negative effect of street lamps without UV for open-space foraging bats of the genera Nyctalus, Eptesicus, and Vespertilio, yet it amplified the already existing negative or positive effect of street lamps with or without UV on Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus, and Myotis spp. Our study underpins the importance of minimizing artificial light at night close to vegetation, particularly for bats adapted to spatial complexity in the environment (i.e., clutter-adapted species), and to increase dense vegetation in urban landscape to provide, besides roosting opportunities, protection against ALAN for open-space foraging bats in city landscapes.
Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2302
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