|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Dominoni, D.M.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W.
Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 256 Issue Pages 113314
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24 h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, the Netherlands; avide.dominoni(at)glasgow.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2744
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dominoni, D.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W.
Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 256 Issue Pages 113314
Keywords Animals; Behavior, physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Cities; Ecosystem; Male; Netherlands; Photoperiod; Seasons; Songbirds; Urbanization; Alan; Circadian rhythms; Great tits; Light pollution; Noise; Urbanization
Abstract (down) Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.
Address Department of Ecological Science, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; davide.dominoni ( at ) glasgow.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31761596 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3312
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, A., Li, W., Wu, J., Lin, J., Chu, J., & Xia, C.
Title How can the urban landscape affect urban vitality at the street block level? A case study of 15 metropolises in China Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Urban vitality, as a metric, measures the attractiveness and competitiveness of a city and is a driver of development. As the physical and social space of human activities, the urban landscape has close connections with urban vitality according to classical theories. However, limited quantitative criteria for the urban landscape and gaps between macro urban planning and micro design create difficulties when constructing a vibrant city. In this study, we quantitatively examined the relationship between the urban landscape and urban vitality at the street block level using geospatial open data to discover where, how, and to what extent we could improve urban vitality, taking 15 Chinese metropolises as a case study. Results indicate that, among the three aspects of the urban landscape considered, the city plan pattern has the highest effect on stimulating vitality, followed by the land use and the patterns of building form. Specifically, the three-dimensional form of buildings has a greater effect than a two-dimensional form. In addition, convenient transportation, a compact block form, diverse buildings, mixed land use, and high buildings are the main characteristics of vibrant blocks. The results also show that the effects of the urban landscape have spatial variations and obvious diurnal discrepancies. Furthermore, over 20 and 33% of the blocks in these cities are identified as low-vitality blocks during the day and night, respectively, and are then categorized into six different types. The identification of the common characteristics of these low-vitality blocks can be taken as references for designing a vibrant urbanity.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2946
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xia, C.; Yeh, A.G.-O.; Zhang, A.
Title Analyzing spatial relationships between urban land use intensity and urban vitality at street block level: A case study of five Chinese megacities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume 193 Issue Pages 103669
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Urban sprawl in urbanizing China has resulted in a series of ecological and environmental problems. Urban planners have been committed to promoting compact development through high-density and mixed land use. However, a problem brought by such compact urban form is the mismatch between physical spaces and socio-economic activities. To date, minimal research has been conducted using spatial statistics to study this issue at the local scales. Moreover, urban night-time vitality has been consistently ignored in existing studies. In the current work, urban land use intensity was analyzed on the basis of street block density and typology, and urban daytime and night-time vitality were measured using small catering business and night-time light data, respectively. The spatial relationships between urban land use intensity and urban vitality were investigated using a local indicator of spatial association (LISA), and five megacities in China were taken as a case study to examine whether variations exist between different cities. Results showed a significant positive spatial autocorrelation between urban land use intensity and urban vitality according to global statistics. Therefore, socio-economic activities are more likely to be abundant in densely developed urban areas. However, local spatial mismatches were found in the five megacities, indicating overcrowded or underutilized urban spaces in all the cities. These relationships were associated with different urban areas (urbanized before 1995 and during 1995–2015), land use conditions (function and mixture) and time periods (day and night). The results of this work will provide a comprehensive understanding of compact city and sustainability.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2697
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lockwood, G.W.; Thompson, D.T.; Floyd, R.D.
Title Sky glow and outdoor lighting trends since 1976 at the Lowell Observatory Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal PASP
Volume 102 Issue Pages 481
Keywords Skyglow; Lighting
Abstract (down) Urban sky-glow (light pollution) trends, recorded photoelectrically in intermediate-band b (472 nm) and y (551 nm) filters at the original site of the Lowell Observatory on Mars Hill near downtown Flagstaff, Arizona, reflect not just the population growth of the surrounding city but also some ameliorating effects of lighting controls and a changing mix of outdoor lighting sources. Since 1976 the sky brightness increased in b but has been virtually constant in y. New ordinances limit lighting growth near observatories and require monochromatic low-pressure sodium luminaires for most applications.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3026
Permanent link to this record