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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R.
Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191
Keywords Animals
Abstract (up) Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752
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Author Chen, Shanshan; Hu, Deyong
Title Parameterizing Anthropogenic Heat Flux with an Energy-Consumption Inventory and Multi-Source Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 9 Issue 11 Pages 1165
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Anthropogenic heat (AH) generated by human activities is an important factor affecting the urban climate. Thus, refined AH parameterization of a large area can provide data support for regional meteorological research. In this study, we developed a refined anthropogenic heat flux (RAHF) parameterization scheme to estimate the gridded anthropogenic heat flux (AHF). Firstly, the annual total AH emissions and annual mean AHF of Beijing municipality in the year 2015 were estimated using a top-down, energy-consumption inventory method, which was derived based on socioeconomic statistics and energy consumption data. The heat released from industry, transportation, buildings (including both commercial and residential buildings), and human metabolism were taken into account. Then, the county-scale AHF estimation model was constructed based on multi-source remote sensing data, such as Suomi national polar-orbiting partnership (Suomi-NPP) visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS) nighttime light (NTL) data and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. This model was applied to estimate the annual mean AHF of the counties in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region. Finally, the gridded AHF data with 500-m resolution was obtained using a RAHF parameterization scheme. The results indicate that the annual total AH emissions of Beijing municipality in the year 2015 was approximately 1.704 × 1018 J. Of this, the buildings contribute about 34.5%, followed by transportation and industry with about 30.5% and 30.1%, respectively, and human metabolism with only about 4.9%. The annual mean AHF value of the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region is about 6.07 W·m−2, and the AHF in urban areas is about in the range of 20 W·m−2 and 130 W·m−2. The maximum AHF value is approximately 130.84 W·m−2, mostly in airports, railway stations, central business districts, and other densely-populated areas. The error analysis of the county-scale AHF results showed that the residual between the model estimation and energy consumption statistics is less than 1%. In addition, the spatial distribution of RAHF results is generally centered on urban area and gradually decreases towards suburbs. The spatial pattern of the RAHF results within urban areas corresponds well to the distribution of population density, building density, and the industrial district. The spatial heterogeneity of AHF within urban areas is well-reflected through the RAHF results. The RAHF results can be used in meteorological and environmental modeling for the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region. The results of this study also highlight the superiority of Suomi-NPP VIIRS NTL data for AHF estimation.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2342
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Author Adams, C.A.; Blumenthal, A.; Fernández-Juricic, E.; Bayne, E.; St. Clair, C.C.
Title Effect of anthropogenic light on bird movement, habitat selection, and distribution: a systematic map protocol Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Evidence Abbreviated Journal Environ Evid
Volume 8 Issue S1 Pages 13
Keywords Animals; BirdsDepartment of Biological Science, University of Alberta, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada
Abstract (up) Anthropogenic light is known or suspected to exert profound effects on many taxa, including birds. Documentation of bird aggregation around artificial light at night, as well as observations of bird reactions to strobe lights and lasers, suggests that light may both attract and repel birds, although this assumption has yet to be tested. These effects may cause immediate changes to bird movement, habitat selection and settlement, and ultimately alter bird distribution at large spatial scales. Global increases in the extent of anthropogenic light contribute to interest by wildlife managers and the public in managing light to reduce harm to birds, but there are no evidence syntheses of the multiple ways light affects birds to guide this effort. Existing reviews usually emphasize either bird aggregation or deterrence and do so for a specific context, such as aggregation at communication towers and deterrence from airports. We outline a protocol for a systematic map that collects and organizes evidence from the many contexts in which anthropogenic light is reported to affect bird movement, habitat selection, or distribution. Our map will provide an objective synthesis of the evidence that identifies subtopics that may support systematic review and knowledge gaps that could direct future research questions. These products will substantially advance an understanding of both patterns and processes associated with the responses of birds to anthropogenic light.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-2382 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2547
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Author Russo, D.; Cosentino, F.; Festa, F.; De Benedetta, F.; Pejic, B.; Cerretti, P.; Ancillotto, L.
Title Artificial illumination near rivers may alter bat-insect trophic interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 252 Issue Pt B Pages 1671-1677
Keywords Animals
Abstract (up) Artificial illumination at night represents an increasingly concerning threat to ecosystems worldwide, altering persistence, behaviour, physiology and fitness of many organisms and their mutual interactions, in the long-term affecting ecosystem functioning. Bats are very sensitive to artificial light at night because they are obligate nocturnal and feed on insects which are often also responsive to lights. Here we tested the effects of LED lighting on prey-predator interactions at riverine ecosystems, using bats and their insect prey as models, and compared bat and insect reactions in terms of bat activity and prey insect abundance and diversity, respectively, on artificially lit vs. unlit nights. Artificial light influenced both insect and bat assemblages in taxon-specific directions: insect abundances increased at lit sites, particularly due to an increase in small dipterans near the light source. Composition of insect assemblages also differed significantly between lit and unlit sites. Total bat activity declined at lit sites, but this change was mainly due to the response of the most abundant species, Myotis daubentonii, while opportunistic species showed no reaction or even an opposite pattern (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We show that artificial lighting along rivers may affect trophic interactions between bats and insects, resulting in a profound alteration of community structure and dynamics.
Address Wildlife Research Unit, Dipartimento di Agraria, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Universita, 100, 80055, Portici, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31284209 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2572
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Author Gong, P.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Bai, Y.; Chen, B.; Hu, T.; Liu, X.; Xu, B.; Yang, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, Y.
Title Annual maps of global artificial impervious area (GAIA) between 1985 and 2018 Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 236 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Artificial impervious areas are predominant indicators of human settlements. Timely, accurate, and frequent information on artificial impervious areas is critical to understanding the process of urbanization and land use/cover change, as well as of their impacts on the environment and biodiversity. Despite their importance, there still lack annual maps of high-resolution Global Artificial Impervious Areas (GAIA) with longer than 30-year records, due to the high demand of high performance computation and the lack of effective mapping algorithms. In this paper, we mapped annual GAIA from 1985 to 2018 using the full archive of 30-m resolution Landsat images on the Google Earth Engine platform. With ancillary datasets, including the nighttime light data and the Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar data, we improved the performance of our previously developed algorithm in arid areas. We evaluated the GAIA data for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015, and the mean overall accuracy is higher than 90%. A cross-product comparison indicates the GAIA data are the only dataset spanning over 30 years. The temporal trend in GAIA agrees well with other datasets at the local, regional, and global scales. Our results indicate that the GAIA reached 797,076 km2 in 2018, which is 1.5 times more than that in 1990. China and the United States (US) rank among the top two in artificial impervious area, accounting for approximately 50% of the world's total in 2018. The artificial impervious area of China surpassed that of the US in 2015. By 2018, the remaining eight among the top ten countries are India, Russia, Brazil, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, and Canada. The GAIA dataset can be freely downloaded from http://data.ess.tsinghua.edu.cn.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2756
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