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Author Maroni, M.J.; Capri, K.M.; Arruda, N.L.; Gelineau, R.R.; Deane, H.V.; Concepcion, H.A.; DeCourcey, H.; Monteiro De Pina, I.K.; Cushman, A.V.; Chasse, M.H.; Logan, R.W.; Seggio, J.A.
Title Substrain specific behavioral responses in male C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J mice to a shortened 21-hour day and high-fat diet Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Mouse; circadian; high-fat diet; locomotor activity; photoperiod; strain differences
Abstract (up) Altered circadian rhythms have negative consequences on health and behavior. Emerging evidence suggests genetics influences the physiological and behavioral responses to circadian disruption. We investigated the effects of a 21 h day (T = 21 cycle), with high-fat diet consumption, on locomotor activity, explorative behaviors, and health in male C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice. Mice were exposed to either a T = 24 or T = 21 cycle and given standard rodent chow (RC) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) followed by behavioral assays and physiological measures. We uncovered numerous strain differences within the behavioral and physiological assays, mainly that C57BL/6J mice exhibit reduced susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of (HFD) and anxiety-like behavior as well as increased circadian and novelty-induced locomotor activity compared to C57BL/6N mice. There were also substrain-specific differences in behavioral responses to the T = 21 cycle, including exploratory behaviors and circadian locomotor activity. Under the 21-h day, mice consuming RC displayed entrainment, while mice exposed to HFD exhibited a lengthening of activity rhythms. In the open-field and light-dark box, mice exposed to the T = 21 cycle had increased novelty-induced locomotor activity with no further effects of diet, suggesting daylength may affect mood-related behaviors. These results indicate that different circadian cycles impact metabolic and behavioral responses depending on genetic background, and despite circadian entrainment.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, USA
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32400203 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2919
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Author Péter Á.; Seress G.; Sándor K.; Vincze E.; Klucsik K. P.; Liker A.
Title The effect of artificial light at night on the biomass of caterpillars feeding in urban tree canopies Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract (up) Alternation of day and night is the oldest cycle on Earth, which is increasingly disturbed by the accelerating rate of urbanization and technological development. Despite the ubiquity of light pollution in cities, many aspects of its influence on urban ecosystems are still poorly understood. Here we studied the effect of artificial light at night (ALAN) on the biomass of arboreal caterpillar populations, which are a major component of the diet of many insectivorous animals. We predicted that increasing ALAN intensity is associated with reduced caterpillar biomass, because ALAN may increase predation risk for both caterpillars and adult lepidopterans (i.e. moths), and can also hinder the moths’ reproductive rate. We estimated caterpillar biomass from frass samples (n = 3061) collected from 36 focal trees in two cities in Hungary during four consecutive years. To quantify ALAN we measured light intensity during night at each focal tree (range of illumination: 0.69–3.18 lx). We found that caterpillar biomass of individual trees was repeatable over the four years. This temporal consistency in prey biomass production may be important for birds because it can help predict territory quality, especially in cities where caterpillar abundance is generally low. Our results did not support the negative effect of ALAN on urban caterpillar populations, because ALAN intensity was not related to caterpillar biomass, and this lack of effect was consistent between study sites and tree species. We suggest that the effect of ALAN on urban caterpillar biomass is either weak and thus can be masked by other, local environmental factors, or light pollution may have antagonistic effects acting during different stages of the lepidopteran life cycle. Another explanation could be that even the lower levels of our sites’ public lighting are strong enough to cause serious detrimental effects for caterpillars, resulting in their uniformly low biomass.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3156
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Author Eather, R.H.
Title DMSP calibration Type Journal Article
Year 1979 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.
Volume 84 Issue A8 Pages 4134-4144
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Although DMSP satellite data are widely used, there has been no reliable absolute calibration. Coordinated data with ground‐based photometers allow a calibration curve of film density versus 4728 N2+ intensity to be derived. The DMSP satellites (5C series) record airglow and can detect auroral forms of intensities ≥50 R of 4278 N2+. It is estimated that the 5D series satellites are capable of detecting auroras with ∼25 R of 4278 N2+.
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ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2385
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Author Ciach, M., & Fröhlich, A.
Title Ungulates in the city: light pollution and open habitats predict the probability of roe deer occurring in an urban environment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 513–523
Keywords Animals; ungulates; Poland; Europe; roe deer; Capreolus capreolus
Abstract (up) Although large and medium-sized herbivorous mammals avoid urbanized areas, they have recently begun to colonize towns and cities. In general, ungulates continue to avoid the centres of urban areas, and utilize mainly their thinly built-up outskirts. While extension of urban development is preventing ungulates from penetrating the urban landscape, the influence of noise and light pollution on the occurrence of mammalian herbivores is still poorly understood. Hence, we investigated the hypothesis that habitat availability shapes the distribution of roe deer Capreolus capreolus and artificial lightening discourages them from penetrating the urban landscape. Roe deer was recorded on 37% of randomly selected sample plots (N = 60) located within the city of Kraków (S Poland). The occupied plots contained significantly more open habitats, woodland patches were larger in them, but proximity to rivers, and noise and light pollution were significantly lower. The logistic regression model revealed that an increasing area of open habitats was positively correlated with the probability of roe deer occurring. However, the artificial lighting at night was negatively correlated with the probability of the species occurring: the negative effect of light pollution was mitigated by the greater area of open habitats. Our study highlights the very considerable potential of light pollution as a predictor of the occurrence of large mammals in the urban landscape. We argue that urbanization and the related artificial lighting at night may be a factor preventing ungulates from penetrating potentially suitable habitats in urban areas.
Address Department of Forest Biodiversity, Institute of Forest Ecology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, University of Agriculture, Kraków, Poland; michal.ciach(at)ur.krakow.pl
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2305
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Author Adeniyi, M.J.; Agoreyo, F.O.; Olorunnisola, O.L.; Olaniyan, O.T.; Seriki, S.A.; Ozolua, P.O.; Odetola, A.A.
Title Photo-pollution disrupts reproductive homeostasis in female rats: The duration-dependent role of selenium administrations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication The Chinese Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal Chin J Physiol
Volume 63 Issue 5 Pages 235-243
Keywords Animals; Estrous cycle ratio; follicle-stimulating hormone; luteinizing hormone; photo-pollution; reproductive homeostasis; selenium
Abstract (up) Although selenium is known to be essential for reproductive function, studies have indicated the adverse effect with its prolonged use. The present study investigated the duration-related effect of selenium administrations on reproductive hormones and estrous cycle indices in adult female Wistar rats exposed to a model of light pollution using altered photoperiod (AP). Ninety-six cyclic female Wistar rats displaying 4-5 days' estrous cycle length (ECL) and weighing 148-152 g were randomly divided into short and long experimental cohorts consisting of six groups each and spanning for 1 and 8 weeks, respectively. Each consisted of control, high selenium dose (HSE), low selenium dose (LSE), AP, AP + HSE, and AP + LSE. The rats were orally administered high dose (150 mug/kg) and low dose (100 mug/kg) of sodium selenite once per day. The estrous cycle indices were monitored. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E), progesterone (P), prolactin, E/P ratio, and histology of ovary and uterine horn were evaluated. The statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. In AP rats, HSE and LSE caused no significant effect on LH, E, P, and E/P ratio, ECL, estrus interval (EI), and estrous cycle ratio (ECR). The effect of HSE and LSE on LH, E, P, E/P ratio, and ECL showed no duration-dependent increase, but there was a duration-dependent increase in EI and ECR at low dose. The study indicated that administration of HSE of selenium improved reproductive function in photo-pollution-exposed rats irrespective of the duration of treatment.
Address Department of Anatomy, Edo University Iyamho, Edo State, Nigeria
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ISSN 0304-4920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33109790 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3190
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