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Author Adeniyi, M.J.; Agoreyo, F.O.; Olorunnisola, O.L.; Olaniyan, O.T.; Seriki, S.A.; Ozolua, P.O.; Odetola, A.A.
Title Photo-pollution disrupts reproductive homeostasis in female rats: The duration-dependent role of selenium administrations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication The Chinese Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal Chin J Physiol
Volume 63 Issue 5 Pages 235-243
Keywords Animals; Estrous cycle ratio; follicle-stimulating hormone; luteinizing hormone; photo-pollution; reproductive homeostasis; selenium
Abstract (up) Although selenium is known to be essential for reproductive function, studies have indicated the adverse effect with its prolonged use. The present study investigated the duration-related effect of selenium administrations on reproductive hormones and estrous cycle indices in adult female Wistar rats exposed to a model of light pollution using altered photoperiod (AP). Ninety-six cyclic female Wistar rats displaying 4-5 days' estrous cycle length (ECL) and weighing 148-152 g were randomly divided into short and long experimental cohorts consisting of six groups each and spanning for 1 and 8 weeks, respectively. Each consisted of control, high selenium dose (HSE), low selenium dose (LSE), AP, AP + HSE, and AP + LSE. The rats were orally administered high dose (150 mug/kg) and low dose (100 mug/kg) of sodium selenite once per day. The estrous cycle indices were monitored. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E), progesterone (P), prolactin, E/P ratio, and histology of ovary and uterine horn were evaluated. The statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. In AP rats, HSE and LSE caused no significant effect on LH, E, P, and E/P ratio, ECL, estrus interval (EI), and estrous cycle ratio (ECR). The effect of HSE and LSE on LH, E, P, E/P ratio, and ECL showed no duration-dependent increase, but there was a duration-dependent increase in EI and ECR at low dose. The study indicated that administration of HSE of selenium improved reproductive function in photo-pollution-exposed rats irrespective of the duration of treatment.
Address Department of Anatomy, Edo University Iyamho, Edo State, Nigeria
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0304-4920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33109790 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3194
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Author Jiang, Z.; Zhai, W.; Meng, X.; Long, Y.
Title Identifying Shrinking Cities with NPP-VIIRS Nightlight Data in China Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Urban Planning and Development Abbreviated Journal J. Urban Plann. Dev.
Volume 146 Issue 4 Pages 04020034
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Although there has been a rapid urbanization in China since the 1980s, the simultaneous urban shrinkage phenomenon has existed for a long time. The study of shrinking cities is particularly important for China as the current urban development has changed from physical expansion to built-up area improvement. After redefining what constitutes a city (what we term a natural city), we compared the adjusted nightlight intensity of National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) data between 2013 and 2016 to accurately identify shrinking cities throughout China. The results indicate that there are 2,862 redefined natural cities in China and that the total area reaches 53,275 km2, about 0.5% of the national territory. Based on this, we identified 798 shrinking cities with a total area of 13,839 km2. After analyzing the relative position of shrinking cities and internal shrinking pixels in the geometric space, the morphological characteristics of shrinking cities were systematically classified into six patterns. The majority of shrinking cities belong to scatter shrinkage, central shrinkage, and local shrinkage; only 5% are complete shrinkage; the rest are unilateral shrinkage and peripheral shrinkage. In addition, six shrinkage causes were quantitatively classified and summarized by referring to multiple-source urban data and municipal yearbooks. To enrich the methodological system for urban shrinkage, the research provides a reminder of the need to consider the other side of urbanization (i.e., dissolution of social networks) and proposes appropriate strategies and policies to address shrinkage issues.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0733-9488 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3065
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Author Larsen, D.A.; Martin, A.; Pollard, D.; Nielsen, C.F.; Hamainza, B.; Burns, M.; Stevenson, J.; Winters, A.
Title Leveraging risk maps of malaria vector abundance to guide control efforts reduces malaria incidence in Eastern Province, Zambia Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 10307
Keywords Remote sensing
Abstract (up) Although transmission of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases is geographically heterogeneous, in sub-Saharan Africa risk maps are rarely used to determine which communities receive vector control interventions. We compared outcomes in areas receiving different indoor residual spray (IRS) strategies in Eastern Province, Zambia: (1) concentrating IRS interventions within a geographical area, (2) prioritizing communities to receive IRS based on predicted probabilities of Anopheles funestus, and (3) prioritizing communities to receive IRS based on observed malaria incidence at nearby health centers. Here we show that the use of predicted probabilities of An. funestus to guide IRS implementation saw the largest decrease in malaria incidence at health centers, a 13% reduction (95% confidence interval = 5-21%) compared to concentrating IRS geographically and a 37% reduction (95% confidence interval = 30-44%) compared to targeting IRS based on health facility incidence. These results suggest that vector control programs could produce better outcomes by prioritizing IRS according to malaria-vector risk maps.
Address University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32587283; PMCID:PMC7316765 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3025
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Author Kernbach, M.E.; Newhouse, D.J.; Miller, J.M.; Hall, R.J.; Gibbons, J.; Oberstaller, J.; Selechnik, D.; Jiang, R.H.Y.; Unnasch, T.R.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Martin, L.B.
Title Light pollution increases West Nile virus competence of a ubiquitous passerine reservoir species Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 286 Issue 1907 Pages 20191051
Keywords Animals; Human Health; anthropogenic; ecoimmunology; host competence; light pollution; reservoir host
Abstract (up) Among the many anthropogenic changes that impact humans and wildlife, one of the most pervasive but least understood is light pollution. Although detrimental physiological and behavioural effects resulting from exposure to light at night are widely appreciated, the impacts of light pollution on infectious disease risk have not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that artificial light at night (ALAN) extends the infectious-to-vector period of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), an urban-dwelling avian reservoir host of West Nile virus (WNV). Sparrows exposed to ALAN maintained transmissible viral titres for 2 days longer than controls but did not experience greater WNV-induced mortality during this window. Transcriptionally, ALAN altered the expression of gene regulatory networks including key hubs (OASL, PLBD1 and TRAP1) and effector genes known to affect WNV dissemination (SOCS). Despite mounting anti-viral immune responses earlier, transcriptomic signatures indicated that ALAN-exposed individuals probably experienced pathogen-induced damage and immunopathology, potentially due to evasion of immune effectors. A simple mathematical modelling exercise indicated that ALAN-induced increases of host infectious-to-vector period could increase WNV outbreak potential by approximately 41%. ALAN probably affects other host and vector traits relevant to transmission, and additional research is needed to advise the management of zoonotic diseases in light-polluted areas.
Address Center for Global Health Infectious Disease Research, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31337318; PMCID:PMC6661335 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2611
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Author Gaston, K.J.
Title Lighting up the nighttime Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 362 Issue 6416 Pages 744-746
Keywords Commentary
Abstract (up) Among the most visually compelling images of the whole Earth have been those created using data obtained at night by astronauts or from satellites. The proliferation in use of electric lighting—including from industrial, commercial, municipal, and domestic sources—is striking. It sketches the spatial distribution of much of the human population, outlining a substantial proportion of the world's coastline, highlighting a multitude of towns and cities, and drawing the major highways that connect them. The data embodied in these nighttime images have been used to estimate and map levels of energy use, urbanization, and economic activity. They have also been key in focusing attention on the environmental impacts of the artificial light at night itself. Explicit steps need to be taken to limit these impacts, which vary according to the intensity, spectrum, spatial extent, and temporal dynamics of this lighting.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30442788 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2058
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