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Author Jiang, J.; He, Y.; Kou, H.; Ju, Z.; Gao, X.; Zhao, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of artificial light at night on Eurasian tree sparrow (Passer montanus): Behavioral rhythm disruption, melatonin suppression and intestinal microbiota alterations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 108 Issue Pages 105702  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light at night; Eurasian tree sparrow; Melatonin; Intestinal microbiota  
  Abstract (up) Artificial light at night (ALAN) or light pollution is rapidly widespread with fast urbanization and becomes an obvious environmental disturbance. Recent studies showed ALAN has multiple negative impacts on a wide range of species including bird biological rhythm disruption, behavioral and physiological disturbance and hormone secretion disorder. However, its effects on bird gut microbiota are scarcely studied. In this study, we used Eurasian tree sparrow (Passer montanus), a widely distributed and locally abundant bird species in both urban and rural areas of China to examine the effects of ALAN on locomotor activity rhythm and melatonin secretion, and species diversity and community structure of intestinal microbiota by simulating urban and rural night light environment. Our results showed ALAN strongly affected circadian rhythm of locomotor activity with earlier start of activity before light-on and later rest after light-off. Moreover, ALAN significantly suppressed melatonin release. Last but not least, ALAN profoundly affected taxonomic compositions, species diversity and community structure of intestinal microbiota of birds. We concluded that ALAN may cause bird health damage by disrupting circadian rhythm, inhibiting melatonin release and altering intestinal microbiota. Melatonin hormone level and intestinal microbiota diversity may be important bioindicators for light pollution.  
  Address College of Life Sciences, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2781  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moaraf, S.; Vistoropsky, Y.; Pozner, T.; Heiblum, R.; Okuliarova, M.; Zeman, M.; Barnea, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night affects brain plasticity and melatonin in birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Lett  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 134639  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial Light At Night (ALAN); cell proliferation; circadian cycle; melatonin; neuronal densities; zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)  
  Abstract (up) Artificial light at night (ALAN), which disrupts the daily cycle of light, has vast biological impacts on all organisms, and is also associated with several health problems. The few existing studies on neuronal plasticity and cognitive functions in mammals indicate that a disruption of the circadian cycle impairs learning and memory and suppresses neurogenesis. However, nothing is known about the effect of ALAN on neuronal plasticity in birds. To this end, zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were exposed to ecologically relevant ALAN intensities (0.5, 1.5 and 5 lux), treated with BrdU to quantify cell proliferation in their ventricular zone (VZ), and compared to controls that were kept under dark nights. We found, in our diurnal birds, that ALAN significantly increased cell proliferation in the VZ. However, neuronal densities in two brain regions decreased under ALAN, suggesting neuronal death. In addition, ALAN suppressed nocturnal melatonin production in a dose-dependent manner, and might also increase body mass. Taken together, our findings add to the notion of the deleterious effect of ALAN.  
  Address Department of Natural and Life Sciences, The Open University of Israel, Ra'anana, 43107, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31760086 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2760  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Levy, O.; Fernandes de Barros Marangoni, L.; Cohen, J.I.; Rottier, C.; Béraud, E.; Grover, R.; Ferrier-Pagès, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night (ALAN) alters the physiology and biochemistry of symbiotic reef building corals Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume 266 Issue Pages 114987  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract (up) Artificial Light at Night (ALAN), which is the alteration of natural light levels as the result of anthropogenic light sources, has been acknowledged as an important factor that alters the functioning of marine ecosystems. Using LEDs light to mimic ALAN, we studied the effect on the physiology (symbiont and chlorophyll contents, photosynthesis, respiration, pigment profile, skeletal growth, and oxidative stress responses) of two scleractinian coral species originating from the Red Sea. ALAN induced the photoinhibition of symbiont photosynthesis, as well as an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and an increase in oxidative damage to lipids in both coral species. The extent of the deleterious effects of ALAN on the symbiotic association and coral physiology was aligned with the severity of the oxidative stress condition experienced by the corals. The coral species Sylophora pistillata, which experienced a more severe oxidative stress condition than the other species tested, Turbinaria reniformis, also showed a more pronounced bleaching (loss of symbionts and chlorophyll content), enhanced photoinhibition and decreased photosynthetic rates. Findings of the present study further our knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underpinning the deleterious impacts of ALAN on scleractinian corals, ultimately shedding light on the emerging threat of ALAN on coral reef ecology. Further, considering that global warming and light pollution will increase in the next few decades, future studies should be taken to elucidate the potential synergetic effects of ALAN and global climate change stressors.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2982  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pu, G.; Zeng, D.; Mo, L.; Liao, J.; Chen, X.; Qiu, S.; Lv, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night alter the impact of arsenic on microbial decomposers and leaf litter decomposition in streams Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Abbreviated Journal Ecotoxicol Environ Saf  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 110014  
  Keywords Ecology; Microbes; Fungal communities and biodiversity; Illumina sequencing; Light pollution; Litter decomposition; Microbiological oxidation  
  Abstract (up) Artificial light at night (ALAN, also known as light pollution) has been proved to be a contributor to environmental change and a biodiversity threat worldwide, yet little is known about its potential interaction with different metal pollutants, such as arsenic (As), one of the largest threats to aquatic ecosystems. To narrow this gap, an indoor microcosm study was performed using an ALAN simulation device to examine whether ALAN exposure altered the impact of arsenic on plant litter decomposition and its associated fungi. Results revealed that microbial decomposers involved in the conversion of As(III) to As(V), and ALAN exposure enhanced this effect; ALAN or arsenic only exposure altered fungal community composition and the correlations between fungi species, as well as stimulated or inhibited litter decomposition, respectively. The negative effects of arsenic on the decomposition of Pterocarya stenoptera leaf litter was alleviated by ALAN resulting in the enhanced photodegradation of leaf litter lignin and microbiological oxidation of As(III) to As(V), the increased microbial biomass and CBH activity, as well as the enhanced correlations between CBH and litter decomposition rate. Overall, results expand our understanding of ALAN on environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to the toxicity of arsenic in aquatic ecosystems.  
  Address School of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 261053, China. Electronic address: njandgl@163.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0147-6513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31810590 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2777  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Z.; Lv, Y.; Ding, R.; Chen, X.; Pu, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Pollution Changes the Toxicological Effects of Cadmium on Microbial Community Structure and Function Associated with Leaf Litter Decomposition Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Plants; Illumina Sequencing; artificial light at night; cadmium pollution; extracellular enzyme activities; litter decomposition; microbial biodiversity  
  Abstract (up) Artificial light at night (ALAN/A) can not only alter the behavior and communication of biological organisms, it can also interact with other stressors. Despite its widespread use and the numerous potential ecological effects, little is known about the impact of ALAN on plant litter decomposition under cadmium (Cd) pollution in aquatic ecosystems. In an indoor microcosm experiment, we tested single and combined effects of ALAN and Cd on the activities and community structure of fungi associated with plant litter. The results showed that ALAN and/or Cd can change both water and leaf litter characteristics. ALAN exposure not only altered fungal community structure and their correlations, but also increased the activities of alkaline phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, and cellobiohydrolase. The leaf litter decomposition rate was 71% higher in the A-Cd treatment than that in the N-Cd treatment, indicating that the presence of ALAN weakened the negative impact of Cd on leaf litter decomposition. These results suggested that ALAN exposure mitigated the negative effect of Cd on leaf litter decomposition, contributing to the duel effect of ALAN on leaf litter decomposition. Overall, the results expand our understanding of ALAN on the environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to Cd toxicity in aquatic ecosystems.  
  Address Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin 541006, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31936535 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2818  
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