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Author Bharti, N.; Tatem, A.J.
Title Fluctuations in anthropogenic nighttime lights from satellite imagery for five cities in Niger and Nigeria Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Data Abbreviated Journal Sci Data
Volume 5 Issue Pages 180256
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Dynamic measures of human populations are critical for global health management but are often overlooked, largely because they are difficult to quantify. Measuring human population dynamics can be prohibitively expensive in under-resourced communities. Satellite imagery can provide measurements of human populations, past and present, to complement public health analyses and interventions. We used anthropogenic illumination from publicly accessible, serial satellite nighttime images as a quantifiable proxy for seasonal population variation in five urban areas in Niger and Nigeria. We identified population fluxes as the mechanistic driver of regional seasonal measles outbreaks. Our data showed 1) urban illumination fluctuated seasonally, 2) corresponding population fluctuations were sufficient to drive seasonal measles outbreaks, and 3) overlooking these fluctuations during vaccination activities resulted in below-target coverage levels, incapable of halting transmission of the virus. We designed immunization solutions capable of achieving above-target coverage of both resident and mobile populations. Here, we provide detailed data on brightness from 2000-2005 for 5 cities in Niger and Nigeria and detailed methodology for application to other populations.
Address (down) WorldPop, Department of Geography and Environment, University of Southampton; Flowminder Foundation, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2052-4463 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30422123; PMCID:PMC6233255 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2769
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Author Russo, D.; Cosentino, F.; Festa, F.; De Benedetta, F.; Pejic, B.; Cerretti, P.; Ancillotto, L.
Title Artificial illumination near rivers may alter bat-insect trophic interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 252 Issue Pt B Pages 1671-1677
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial illumination at night represents an increasingly concerning threat to ecosystems worldwide, altering persistence, behaviour, physiology and fitness of many organisms and their mutual interactions, in the long-term affecting ecosystem functioning. Bats are very sensitive to artificial light at night because they are obligate nocturnal and feed on insects which are often also responsive to lights. Here we tested the effects of LED lighting on prey-predator interactions at riverine ecosystems, using bats and their insect prey as models, and compared bat and insect reactions in terms of bat activity and prey insect abundance and diversity, respectively, on artificially lit vs. unlit nights. Artificial light influenced both insect and bat assemblages in taxon-specific directions: insect abundances increased at lit sites, particularly due to an increase in small dipterans near the light source. Composition of insect assemblages also differed significantly between lit and unlit sites. Total bat activity declined at lit sites, but this change was mainly due to the response of the most abundant species, Myotis daubentonii, while opportunistic species showed no reaction or even an opposite pattern (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We show that artificial lighting along rivers may affect trophic interactions between bats and insects, resulting in a profound alteration of community structure and dynamics.
Address (down) Wildlife Research Unit, Dipartimento di Agraria, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Universita, 100, 80055, Portici, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31284209 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2572
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Author Pilz, L.K.; Levandovski, R.; Oliveira, M.A.B.; Hidalgo, M.P.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Sleep and light exposure across different levels of urbanisation in Brazilian communities Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 11389
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Quilombos are settlements originally founded by Africans and African descendants (Quilombolas) in remote parts of Brazil to escape slavery. Due to individual histories, Quilombos nowadays exhibit different states of industrialisation, making them ideal for studying the influence of electrification on daily behaviour. In a comparative approach, we aimed to understand whether and how human sleep changes with the introduction of artificial light. We investigated daily rest-activity-rhythms and sleep-patterns in the Quilombolas' by both wrist actimetry and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ; the results of these two instruments correlated highly). Seven communities (MCTQ: N = 213/actimetry: N = 125) were compared in this study. Light exposure, phase of activity, sleep timing and duration differ across communities with various levels of urbanisation and histories of access to electricity. People living without electricity and those, who acquired it only very recently on average sleep earlier than those in more urbanised communities (mid-sleep about 1 hour earlier); sleep duration tends to be longer. Our results and those of others show that use of electricity and modern lifestyles have changed sleep behaviour. To understand the consequences of these changes for health, further studies are warranted.
Address (down) Visiting Professor at UFRGS/CAPES, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. roenneberg@lmu.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30061685 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1968
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Author Blagonravov, M.L.; Bryk, A.A.; Medvedeva, E.V.; Goryachev, V.A.; Chibisov, S.M.; Kurlaeva, A.O.; Agafonov, E.D.
Title Structure of Rhythms of Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Excretion of Electrolytes, and Secretion of Melatonin in Normotensive and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Maintained under Conditions of Prolonged Daylight Duration Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bull Exp Biol Med
Volume 168 Issue 1 Pages 18-23
Keywords Animals; arterial hypertension; biological rhythms; excessive exposure to light; melatonin
Abstract We studied the structure of rhythms of BP, HR (by telemetric monitoring), electrolyte excretion (by capillary electrophoresis), and products of epiphyseal melatonin (by the urinary concentration of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin measured by ELISA) in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive SHR rats maintained at 16/8 h and 20/4 h light-dark regimes. In Wister-Kyoto rats exposed to prolonged daylight, we observed changes in the amplitude, rhythm power (% of rhythm), and range of oscillations of systolic BP; HR mezor decreased. In SHR rats, mezor of HR also decreased, but other parameters of rhythms remained unchanged. Changes in electrolyte excretion were opposite in normo- and hypertensive rats. Under conditions of 20/4 h light-dark regime, daytime melatonin production tended to increase in normotensive rats and significantly increased in SHR rats. At the same time, nighttime melatonin production did not change in both normotensive and hypertensive animals. As the secretion of melatonin has similar features in animals of both lines, we can say that the epiphyseal component of the “biological clock” is not the only component of the functional system that determines the response of the studied rhythms to an increase in the duration of light exposure.
Address (down) V. A. Frolov Department of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Institute for Medicine, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow, Russia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-4888 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31741240 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2755
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Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B.
Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 563 Issue 7732 Pages 493-500
Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Plants; Review
Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.
Address (down) Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110
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