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Author Ma, Q.; Tan, Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, S.; Sun, Y.; Zhou, B.
Title Regulation of the MAPK signaling pathway by miR-421-5p in rats under light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Molecular Medicine Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Med
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract The present study aimed to explore the difference in the expression profiles of ovarian microRNA sequences in rats in a light pollution environment and rats in a normal light environment. Rats in the control group were exposed to 12h light/dark cycles, while rats in the model group were continuously exposed to 24h light. The ovaries were extracted from the two groups of rats, and Illumina HiSeq 2500 highthroughput sequencing technology was used to detect the differences in microRNA (miRNA) expression among the two groups. Fluorescence quantitative reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction was used to verify the differential expression of miRNA. The present study was designed to experimentally validate the interaction between miR4215p and mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) 7 by using the dualluciferase reporter system, and to explore the expression of proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway with a lentiviral vectormediated small hairpin RNA interference against microRNA4215p. The expression of 45 miRNAs was significantly different. In total, 13 miRNAs were upregulated, of which 5 miRNA sequences were known and 8 were predicted. Furthermore, 32 miRNAs were downregulated, of which 11 miRNA sequences were known and 21 were predicted. The results of the luciferase reporter assay confirmed the targeting association between miR4215p and MAPK7. The expression levels of MAPK and genes in its downstream signaling pathways, including cFos, CREB and cMyc, were downregulated when miR4215p was overexpressed and upregulated when miR4215p was silenced. The differential expression of miRNAs may serve an important role in the development of the ovary in a light pollution environment. miR4215p may regulate ovarian growth and development by targeting the MAPK signaling pathway in light polluted rat ovaries.
Address (down) Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023, P.R. China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1107-3756 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30221682 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2005
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Author Hicks, D.; Attia, D.; Behar-Cohen, F.; Carre, S.; Enouf, O.; Falcon, J.; Gronfier, C.; Martinsons, C.; Metlaine, A.; Tahkamo, L.; Torriglia, A.; FrancoiseVienot
Title How good is the evidence that light at night can affect human health? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology = Albrecht von Graefes Archiv fur Klinische und Experimentelle Ophthalmologie Abbreviated Journal Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Commentary
Abstract Light pollution and exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) have become almost universal in the modern world. Although there is an ongoing debate about how such environmental changes can affect human well-being and health, there is no doubt that ALAN perturbs the circadian clock – an ancestral system which synchronizes bodily physiology with the day-night cycle. The eye, especially the retina, has a dual role in this story – on the one hand, it is the unique source of light entry to the central clock in the brain, and on the other, eyes themselves are strongly regulated by endogenous circadian clocks. This editorial gives a very brief overview of the situation and poses certain unanswered questions.
Address (down) Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0721-832X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31900646 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2791
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Author Mireku, M.O.; Barker, M.M.; Mutz, J.; Dumontheil, I.; Thomas, M.S.C.; Roosli, M.; Elliott, P.; Toledano, M.B.
Title Night-time screen-based media device use and adolescents' sleep and health-related quality of life Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int
Volume 124 Issue Pages 66-78
Keywords Human Health
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates the relationship between night-time screen-based media devices (SBMD) use, which refers to use within 1h before sleep, in both lit and dark rooms, and sleep outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among 11 to 12-year-olds. METHODS: We analysed baseline data from a large cohort of 6616 adolescents from 39 schools in and around London, United Kingdom, participating in the Study of Cognition Adolescents and Mobile Phone (SCAMP). Adolescents self-reported their use of any SBMD (mobile phone, tablet, laptop, television etc.). Sleep variables were derived from self-reported weekday and/or weekend bedtime, sleep onset latency (SOL) and wake time. Sleep quality was assessed using four standardised dimensions from the Swiss Health Survey. HRQoL was estimated using the KIDSCREEN-10 questionnaire. RESULTS: Over two-thirds (71.5%) of adolescents reported using at least one SBMD at night-time, and about a third (32.2%) reported using mobile phones at night-time in darkness. Night-time mobile phone and television use was associated with higher odds of insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (Odds Ratio, OR=1.82, 95% Confidence Interval, CI [1.59, 2.07] and OR=1.40, 95% CI [1.23, 1.60], respectively). Adolescents who used mobile phones in a room with light were more likely to have insufficient sleep (OR=1.32, 95% CI [1.10, 1.60]) and later sleep midpoint (OR=1.64, 95% CI [1.37, 1.95]) on weekends compared to non-users. The magnitude of these associations was even stronger for those who used mobile phones in darkness for insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (OR=2.13, 95% CI [1.79, 2.54]) and for later sleep midpoint on weekdays (OR=3.88, 95% CI [3.25, 4.62]) compared to non-users. Night-time use of mobile phones was associated with lower HRQoL and use in a dark room was associated with even lower KIDSCREEN-10 score (beta=-1.18, 95% CI [-1.85, -0.52]) compared to no use. CONCLUSIONS: We found consistent associations between night-time SBMD use and poor sleep outcomes and worse HRQoL in adolescents. The magnitude of these associations was stronger when SBMD use occurred in a dark room versus a lit room.
Address (down) MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK; National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Health Impact of Environmental Hazards at King's College London, a Partnership with Public Health England, and collaboration with Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK. Electronic address: m.toledano@imperial.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30640131 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2181
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Author Watson, L.A.; Phillips, A.J.K.; Hosken, I.T.; McGlashan, E.M.; Anderson, C.; Lack, L.C.; Lockley, S.W.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Cain, S.W.
Title Increased sensitivity of the circadian system to light in delayed sleep-wake phase disorder Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract KEY POINTS: This is the first study to demonstrate an altered circadian phase shifting response in a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Patients with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD) demonstrate greater sensitivity of the circadian system to the phase delaying effects of light. Increased circadian sensitivity to light is associated with later circadian timing within both control and DSWPD groups. DSWPD patients had a greater sustained pupil response after light exposure. Treatments for DSWPD should consider sensitivity of the circadian system to light as a potential underlying vulnerability, making patients susceptible to relapse. ABSTRACT: Patients with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD) exhibit delayed sleep-wake behavior relative to desired bedtime, often leading to chronic sleep restriction and daytime dysfunction. The majority of DSWPD patients also display delayed circadian timing in the melatonin rhythm. Hypersensitivity of the circadian system to phase delaying light is a plausible physiological basis for DSWPD vulnerability. We compared the phase shifting response to a 6.5-h light exposure ( approximately 150 lux) between male patients with diagnosed DSWPD (n = 10; aged 22.4 +/- 3.3 years) and male healthy controls (n = 11; aged 22.4 +/- 2.4 years). Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was measured under controlled conditions in dim light (<3 lux) before and after light exposure. Correcting for the circadian time of the light exposure, DSWPD patients exhibited 31.5% greater phase delay shifts than healthy controls. In both groups, a later initial phase of the melatonin rhythm was associated with greater magnitude of phase shifts, indicating that increased circadian sensitivity to light may be a factor that contributes to delayed phase, even in non-clinical groups. DSWPD patients also had reduced pupil size following the light exposure, and showed a trend towards increased melatonin suppression during light exposure. These findings indicate that, for patients with DSWPD, assessment of light sensitivity may be an important factor that can inform behavioral therapy, including minimization of exposure to phase-delaying night-time light. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address (down) Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30281150 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2026
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Author McGlashan, E.M.; Nandam, L.S.; Vidafar, P.; Mansfield, D.R.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Cain, S.W.
Title The SSRI citalopram increases the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light in an acute dose Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Psychopharmacology Abbreviated Journal Psychopharmacology (Berl)
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Human Health
Abstract RATIONALE: Disturbances of the circadian system are common in depression. Though they typically subside when depression is treated with antidepressants, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Despite being the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on the human circadian clock is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of the SSRI citalopram (30 mg) on the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light. METHODS: This study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects, crossover design. Participants completed two melatonin suppression assessments in room level light (~ 100 lx), taking either a single dose of citalopram 30 mg or a placebo at the beginning of each light exposure. Melatonin suppression was calculated by comparing placebo and citalopram light exposure conditions to a dim light baseline. RESULTS: A 47% increase in melatonin suppression was observed after administration of an acute dose of citalopram, with all participants showing more suppression after citalopram administration (large effect, d = 1.54). Further, melatonin onset occurred later under normal room light with citalopram compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Increased sensitivity of the circadian system to light could assist in explaining some of the inter-individual variability in antidepressant treatment responses, as it is likely to assist in recovery in some patients, while causing further disruption for others.
Address (down) Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia. sean.cain@monash.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-3158 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30219986 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2012
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