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Author Salat, H.; Smoreda, Z.; Schlapfer, M.
Title A method to estimate population densities and electricity consumption from mobile phone data in developing countries Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 15 Issue 6 Pages e0235224
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract High quality census data are not always available in developing countries. Instead, mobile phone data are becoming a popular proxy to evaluate the density, activity and social characteristics of a population. They offer additional advantages: they are updated in real-time, include mobility information and record visitors' activity. However, we show with the example of Senegal that the direct correlation between the average phone activity and both the population density and the nighttime lights intensity may be insufficiently high to provide an accurate representation of the situation. There are reasons to expect this, such as the heterogeneity of the market share or the particular granularity of the distribution of cell towers. In contrast, we present a method based on the daily, weekly and yearly phone activity curves and on the network characteristics of the mobile phone data, that allows to estimate more accurately such information without compromising people's privacy. This information can be vital for development and infrastructure planning. In particular, this method could help to reduce significantly the logistic costs of data collection in the particularly budget-constrained context of developing countries.
Address (down) Future Cities Laboratory, Singapore-ETH Centre, ETH Zurich, Singapore, Singapore
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32603345 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3030
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Author Voigt, C.C.; Rehnig, K.; Lindecke, O.; Petersons, G.
Title Migratory bats are attracted by red light but not by warm-white light: Implications for the protection of nocturnal migrants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol
Volume 8 Issue 18 Pages 9353-9361
Keywords Animals
Abstract The replacement of conventional lighting with energy-saving light emitting diodes (LED) is a worldwide trend, yet its consequences for animals and ecosystems are poorly understood. Strictly nocturnal animals such as bats are particularly sensitive to artificial light at night (ALAN). Past studies have shown that bats, in general, respond to ALAN according to the emitted light color and that migratory bats, in particular, exhibit phototaxis in response to green light. As red and white light is frequently used in outdoor lighting, we asked how migratory bats respond to these wavelength spectra. At a major migration corridor, we recorded the presence of migrating bats based on ultrasonic recorders during 10-min light-on/light-off intervals to red or warm-white LED, interspersed with dark controls. When the red LED was switched on, we observed an increase in flight activity for Pipistrellus pygmaeus and a trend for a higher activity for Pipistrellus nathusii. As the higher flight activity of bats was not associated with increased feeding, we rule out the possibility that bats foraged at the red LED light. Instead, bats may have flown toward the red LED light source. When exposed to warm-white LED, general flight activity at the light source did not increase, yet we observed an increased foraging activity directly at the light source compared to the dark control. Our findings highlight a response of migratory bats toward LED light that was dependent on light color. The most parsimonious explanation for the response to red LED is phototaxis and for the response to warm-white LED foraging. Our findings call for caution in the application of red aviation lighting, particularly at wind turbines, as this light color might attract bats, leading eventually to an increased collision risk of migratory bats at wind turbines.
Address (down) Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies Jelgava Latvia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30377506; PMCID:PMC6194273 Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2074
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Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M.
Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol
Volume 97 Issue 9 Pages 863-871
Keywords Animals; mouse models
Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a light (L)/dark (D) cycle of 12:12 h and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lux), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of LD variability for systolic blood pressure (SysBP), but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of SysBP was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppar, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb BP control and augment insulin resistance in SHR, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.
Address (down) Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Animal Physiology and Ethology , Ilkovicova 6 , Slovakia , Bratislava, Slovakia, Slovakia , 84215 ; mzeman@fns.uniba.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2567
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Bará, S.
Title Aerosol characterization using satellite remote sensing of light pollution sources at night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters Abbreviated Journal MNRAS
Volume 495 Issue 1 Pages L76-L80
Keywords Skyglow; Radiative transfer; Light scattering; Aerosols
Abstract A demanding challenge in atmospheric research is the night-time characterization of aerosols using passive techniques, that is, by extracting information from scattered light that has not been emitted by the observer. Satellite observations of artificial night-time lights have been used to retrieve some basic integral parameters, like the aerosol optical depth. However, a thorough analysis of the scattering processes allows one to obtain substantially more detailed information on aerosol properties. In this letter, we demonstrate a practicable approach for determining the aerosol particle size number distribution function in the air column, based on the measurement of the angular radiance distribution of the scattered light emitted by night- time lights of cities and towns, recorded from low Earth orbit. The method is self-calibrating and does not require the knowledge of the absolute city emissions. The input radiance data are readily available from several spaceborne platforms, like the VIIRS-DNB radiometer onboard the Suomi-NPP satellite.
Address (down) Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynska Dolina, 842 48 Bratislava, Slovakia; Miroslav.Kocifaj(at)savba.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher OUP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1745-3925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2910
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Author Wesołowski, M.
Title Impact of light pollution on the visibility of astronomical objects in medium-sized cities in Central Europe on the example of the city of Rzeszów, Poland Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy Abbreviated Journal J Astrophys Astron
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 20
Keywords Skyglow; Light pollution; cometary outburst; visibility of astronomical objects
Abstract This paper discusses the influence of light pollution of the night sky on the conditions of visibility of astronomical objects such as planets, stars and comets. This phenomenon has a huge impact on the observability of astronomical objects, especially in cities, where the brightness of the sky makes it difficult or even impossible to conduct astronomical observations. The main purpose of this article is to measure and analyse the surface brightness of the night sky in Rzeszów and its surroundings. A device called the Sky Quality Meter was used to measure the brightness of the night sky. This paper presents measurement results for the years 2015 and 2018, from which it is clear that the quality of the night sky has been deteriorated in terms of the observability of celestial bodies. As an example, the numerical value of the measurement for the centre of Rzeszów has been taken. In 2015, this value was 18.70±1.87 mag/arcsec2, while in 2018, it was equal to 16.73±1.67 mag/arcsec2. The results obtained were used to analyse the visibility of celestial bodies. Here, particular attention was paid to the analysis of the visibility of comets (also during the outburst), in the context of increasing light pollution of the night sky. Observers in neighboring villages have also experienced a change in the sky quality from Bortle Class V to Class VII, requiring objects to be approximately one magnitude brighter in order to be visible.
Address (down) Faculty of Mathematics and Natural SciencesUniversity of Rzeszów, Rzeszów, Poland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0250-6335 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2529
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