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Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B.
Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 563 Issue 7732 Pages 493-500
Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Plants; Review
Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.
Address Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30464269 Approved (up) no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110
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Author Liu, Q.; Manning, A.J.; Duston, J.
Title Light intensity and suppression of nocturnal plasma melatonin in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract The problem of early sexual maturation among farmed Arctic charr and other salmonids can be effectively reduced by 24h light overwinter, provided it is bright enough to over-ride interference from the natural daylength cycle. To determine the threshold light intensity to suppress the nocturnal elevation of plasma melatonin, three groups of individually tagged fish (n=26-28/group ca. 1040g) were reared on 12h light: 12h dark (LD 12:12) and subjected to nighttime light intensities of either 50-65, 0.1-0.3 or 0 (control) lux for five months (November to April). Daytime light intensity was 720-750lx. Diel plasma melatonin profiles in both November and April were similar; mean daytime levels ranged from 20 to 100pg/ml, and nighttime levels were inversely proportional to light intensity. In the control group at 0lx, plasma melatonin increased about four-fold after lights-off, ranging between 320 and 430pg/ml. Nighttime light intensity of 0.1-0.3lx halved plasma melatonin levels to 140-220pg/ml, and 50-65lx further reduced the levels to one quarter of the control group, 68-108pg/ml. Among the lit groups, daytime plasma melatonin levels were about 20-30pg/ml, significantly lower than the nocturnal levels suggesting the diel hormonal rhythm was not completely abolished. Fish grew steadily from about 1100g to 1600g between November and April, independent of light intensity (P=.67). Overall, the study demonstrated the sensitivity of pineal melatonin hormone to different light intensities in Arctic charr.
Address Department of Animal Science and Aquaculture, Dalhousie University, Agricultural Campus, Truro, NS B2N 5E3, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30471350 Approved (up) no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2111
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Author Nang, E.E.K.; Abuduxike, G.; Posadzki, P.; Divakar, U.; Visvalingam, N.; Nazeha, N.; Dunleavy, G.; Christopoulos, G.I.; Soh, C.-K.; Jarbrink, K.; Soljak, M.; Car, J.
Title Review of the potential health effects of light and environmental exposures in underground workplaces Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology
Volume 84 Issue Pages 201-209
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Underground workplaces are an important element in modern urban planning. As a result, an increasing but unquantified proportion of the population is being regularly exposed to them. We narratively reviewed the literature on the range of possible environmental exposures, and the possible health effects, to identify future research directions. There is a large but mainly observational research literature on likely underground exposures, including effects of artificial lighting, shift working and light at night on circadian disruptions and associated health effects. There are five studies comparing underground and aboveground environments. Shift working, artificial lighting and poor sleep quality leading to circadian disruption is one physiologic pathway. Working underground may increase exposure to these risks, and may also be associated with vitamin D deficiency, sick building syndrome, excessive noise, radon exposure, and negative psychological effects. In order to plan appropriate interventions, we need to expand our knowledge of the health effects of underground environments. Larger and longer-term studies are required to measure a range of human factors, environmental exposures and confounders. Controlled trials with health economic analyses of new lighting technologies are also required.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved (up) no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2112
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Author Boyce, P.R.
Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health
Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved (up) no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113
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Author McGlashan, E.M.; Poudel, G.R.; Vidafar, P.; Drummond, S.P.A.; Cain, S.W.
Title Imaging Individual Differences in the Response of the Human Suprachiasmatic Area to Light Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front. Neurol.
Volume 9 Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Circadian disruption is associated with poor health outcomes, including sleep and mood disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus acts as the master biological clock in mammals, regulating circadian rhythms throughout the body. The clock is synchronized to the day/night cycle via retinal light exposure. The BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light has been shown to be greater in the night than in the day, consistent with the known sensitivity of the clock to light at night. Whether the BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light is related to a functional outcome has not been demonstrated. In a pilot study (n = 10), we investigated suprachiasmatic area activation in response to light in a 30 s block-paradigm of lights on (100 lux) and lights off (< 1 lux) using the BOLD-fMRI response, compared to each participant's melatonin suppression response to moderate indoor light (100 lux). We found a significant correlation between activation in the suprachiasmatic area in response to light in the scanner and melatonin suppression, with increased melatonin suppression being associated with increased suprachiasmatic area activation in response to the same light level. These preliminary findings are a first step toward using imaging techniques to measure individual differences in circadian light sensitivity, a measure that may have clinical relevance in understanding vulnerability in disorders that are influenced by circadian disruption.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved (up) no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2114
Permanent link to this record