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Author (down) Zerbini, G.; Kantermann, T.; Merrow, M.
Title Strategies to decrease social jetlag: Reducing evening blue light advances sleep and melatonin Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The timing of sleep is under the control of the circadian clock, which uses light to entrain to the external light-dark cycle. A combination of genetic, physiological and environmental factors produces individual differences in chronotype (entrained phase as manifest in sleep timing). A mismatch between circadian and societal (e.g., work) clocks leads to a condition called social jetlag, which is characterized by changing sleep times over work and free days and accumulation of sleep debt. Social jetlag, which is prevalent in late chronotypes, has been related to several health issues. One way to reduce social jetlag would be to advance the circadian clock via modifications of the light environment. We thus performed two intervention field studies to describe methods for decreasing social jetlag. One study decreased evening light exposure (via blue-light-blocking glasses) and the other used increased morning light (via the use of curtains). We measured behaviour as well as melatonin; the latter in order to validate that behaviour was consistent with this neuroendocrinological phase marker of the circadian clock. We found that a decrease in evening blue light exposure led to an advance in melatonin and sleep onset on workdays. Increased morning light exposure advanced neither melatonin secretion nor sleep timing. Neither protocol led to a significant change in social jetlag. Despite this, our findings show that controlling light exposure at home can be effective in advancing melatonin secretion and sleep, thereby helping late chronotypes to better cope with early social schedules.
Address Institute of Medical Psychology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30506899 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2138
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Author (down) Zeale, M.R.K.; Stone, E.L.; Zeale, E.; Browne, W.J.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.
Title Experimentally manipulating light spectra reveals the importance of dark corridors for commuting bats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract The rapid global spread of artificial light at night is causing unprecedented disruption to ecosystems. In otherwise dark environments, street lights restrict the use of major flight routes by some bats, including the threatened lesser horseshoe bat Rhinolophus hipposideros, and may disrupt foraging. Using radio tracking, we examined the response of individual female R. hipposideros to experimental street lights placed on hedgerows used as major flight routes. Hedgerows were illuminated on one side over four nights using lights with different emission spectra, while the opposite side of the hedge was not illuminated. Automated bat detectors were used to examine changes in overall bat activity by R. hipposideros and other bat species present. R. hipposideros activity reduced significantly under all light types, including red light, challenging a previously held assumption that red light is safe for bats. Despite this, R. hipposideros rapidly adapted to the presence of lights by switching their flight paths to the dark side of the hedgerow, enabling them to reach foraging sites without restriction. Red light had no effect on the activity of the other species present. Slow-flying Myotis spp. avoided orange, white and green light, while more agile Pipistrellus spp. were significantly more abundant at these light types compared to dark controls, most probably in response to accumulations of insect prey. No effect of any light type was found for Nyctalus or Eptesicus spp. Our findings demonstrate that caution must be used when promoting forms of lighting that are thought to be safe for wildlife before they are tested more widely. We argue that it is essential to preserve dark corridors free from light pollution to mitigate the impacts of artificial light at night on bat activity and movements. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30288876 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2021
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Author (down) Zapata, M.J.; Sullivan, S.M.P.; Gray, S.M.
Title Artificial Lighting at Night in Estuaries—Implications from Individuals to Ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Estuaries and Coasts Abbreviated Journal
Volume In press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial lighting at night (ALAN) produced by urban, industrial, and roadway lighting, as well as other sources, has dramatically increased in recent decades, especially in coastal environments that support dense human populations. Artificial “lightscapes” are characterized by distinct spatial, temporal, and spectral patterns that can alter natural patterns of light and dark with consequences across levels of biological organization. At the individual level, ALAN can elicit a suite of physiological and behavioral responses associated with light-mediated processes such as diel activity patterns and predator-prey interactions. ALAN has also been shown to modify community composition and trophic structure, with implications for ecosystem-level processes including primary productivity, nutrient cycling, and the energetic linkages between aquatic and terrestrial systems. Here, we review the state of the science relative to the impacts of ALAN on estuaries, which is an important step in assessing the long-term sustainability of coastal regions. We first consider how multiple properties of ALAN (e.g., intensity and spectral content) influence the interaction between physiology and behavior of individual estuarine biota (drawing from studies on invertebrates, fishes, and birds). Second, we link individual- to community- and ecosystem-level responses, with a focus on the impacts of ALAN on food webs and implications for estuarine ecosystem functions. Coastal aquatic communities and ecosystems have been identified as a key priority for ALAN research, and a cohesive research framework will be critical for understanding and mitigating ecological consequences.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2116
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Author (down) Żagan, W.,; Skarżyński, K.
Title Analysis of light pollution from floodlighting: Is there a different approach to floodlighting? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Light and Engineering Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 75-82
Keywords LED lighting
Abstract The research which was prepared for this paper was inspired by a real floodlit object. The main distinctive feature is connected with the directionality of its lighting. The „Sezam” building was one of the first to be illuminated in the opposite way to the usual manner of floodlighting. The analysis, based on the measurement of horizontal illuminance on the pavement in front of the building andof theluminance on the facade, leads to some very unusual conclusions. It goes deeper than merely the assessment of the phenomenon of light pollution in the context of floodlighting. Additionally, a short survey about the preferences of lighting directionality in floodlighting and the general concept of light pollution was conducted on a group of over a dozen people. It turned out that people are quite aware of the phenomenon of light pollution and they rather prefer illumination from floodlighting to be from bottom to top.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2450
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Author (down) Żagan, W.
Title Opinion: Obtrusive light and floodlighting Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 640-640
Keywords Commentary
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2713
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