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Author (down) Xu, C.; Wang, H.-J.; Yu, Q.; Wang, H.-Z.; Liang, X.-M.; Liu, M.; Jeppesen, E.
Title Effects of Artificial LED Light on the Growth of Three Submerged Macrophyte Species during the Low-Growth Winter Season: Implications for Macrophyte Restoration in Small Eutrophic Lakes Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Water Abbreviated Journal Water
Volume 11 Issue 7 Pages 1512
Keywords Plants
Abstract Eutrophication of lakes is becoming a global environmental problem, leading to, among other things, rapid reproduction of phytoplankton, increased turbidity, loss of submerged macrophytes, and the recovery of these plants following nutrient loading reduction is often delayed. Artificial light supplement could potentially be a useful method to help speeding up recovery. In this study, three common species of submerged macrophytes, Vallisneria natans, Myriophyllum spicatum and Ceratophyllum demersum, were exposed to three LED light treatments (blue, red and white) and shaded (control) for 100 days (from 10 November 2016 to 18 January 2017) in 12 tanks holding 800 L of water. All the three LED light treatments promoted growth of the three macrophyte species in terms of shoot number, length and dry mass. The three light treatments differed in their effects on the growth of the plants; generally, the red light had the strongest promoting effects, followed by blue and white. The differences in light effects may be caused by the different photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of the lights, as indicated by an observed relationship of PPFD with the growth variables. The three species also responded differently to the light treatments, V. natans and C. demersum showing higher growth than M. spicatum. Our findings demonstrate that artificial light supplement in the low-growth winter season can promote growth and recovery of submerged macrophytes and hence potentially enhance their competitiveness against phytoplankton in the following spring. More studies, however, are needed to elucidate if LED light treatment is a potential restoration method in small lakes, when the growth of submerged macrophytes are delayed following a sufficiently large external nutrient loading reduction for a shift to a clear macrophyte state to have a potential to occur. Our results may also be of relevance when elucidating the role of artificial light from cities on the ecosystem functioning of lakes in urban areas.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4441 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2606
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Author (down) Xie, Y.; Weng, Q.; Fu, P.
Title Temporal variations of artificial nighttime lights and their implications for urbanization in the conterminous United States, 2013–2017 Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 225 Issue Pages 160-174
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Artificial nighttime lights (NTL) generated by human activities offer a unique opportunity to understand urban environments. Although previous studies have widely used NTL images to map urban extent at multiple scales, it remains a challenging task to address how NTL respond exactly to urbanization and thus to map urbanization from NTL. In this study, using monthly Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP/VIIRS) NTL images between 2013 and 2017, we developed a method to decompose time-series NTL signal into annual and seasonal components. Further, we proposed an NTL-based indicator for the detection of impervious surfaces change (ISC) by integrating annual increment and seasonal variation of NTL brightness. The indicator was then used to identify ISC by using a thresholding method. The application of the methodology in the conterminous United States (CONUS) revealed a more rapid urbanization in the southern CONUS than the northern states and a northeastern-southwestern gradient of NTL seasonality. It was also found that NTL of November and December provided the most accurate characterization of urban extent for most areas in the CONUS. The detection of ISC in four representative regions (i.e. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, greater Washington D.C., Denver-Aurora, and Atlanta) resulted in a moderate to high accuracy with the overall accuracy of ~80% and the Kappa value ranging from 0.56 to 0.73. Despite of this, the results showed a low accuracy of NTL-derived changing year of ISC (Kappa: 0.28) because of the existence of temporal inconsistency between NTL increase and ISC. The proposed method has the potential to timely map urban expansion at large geographical scales (e.g., continental and global) in a cost-efficient manner.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2336
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Author (down) Xie, Y.; Weng, Q.
Title World energy consumption pattern as revealed by DMSP-OLS nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication GIScience & Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal GIScience & Remote Sensing
Volume 53 Issue 2 Pages 265-282
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Remotely sensed nighttime light (NTL) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) provides a spatially consistent and cost-effective mean to estimate energy consumption pattern. While previous researches have documented the application of NTL to predict electric power consumption (EPC) with varying degrees of success, few have systematically studied the possible factors affecting the EPC-NTL relationship. Moreover, no substantial research effort has been made to relate overall energy consumption (OEC) to NTL. This study investigated key factors governing the EPC/OEC-NTL relationship by examining the influences of affluence, urbanization, technology, temperature, and NTL pattern. Results show that EPC increased with higher per capital GDP, urbanization rate, and high-technology exports, and lower agricultural development, both globally and regionally. Meanwhile, EPC generally reduced with higher temperature and more agglomerate human activities. A strong OEC-NTL relationship was found; but the influencing factors to the OEC-NTL relationship varied across regions due to the natures of energy use. These factors must be considered especially for the studies of less-affluent regions where NTL was undetectable by the DMSP-OLS sensor.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1548-1603 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2485
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Author (down) Xie, Y.; Weng, Q.
Title Detecting urban-scale dynamics of electricity consumption at Chinese cities using time-series DMSP-OLS (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System) nighttime light imageries Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume 100 Issue Pages 177-189
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract A better understanding of the spatiotemporal pattern of energy consumption at the urban scale is significant in the interactions between economic activities and environment. This study assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of EC (electricity consumption) in UC (urban cores) and SR (suburban regions) in China from 2000 to 2012 by using remotely sensed NTL (nighttime light) imagery. Firstly, UC and SR were extracted using a threshold technique. Next, provincial level model was calibrated yearly by using Enhanced Vegetation Index and population-adjusted NTL data as independent variables. These models were then applied for pixel-based estimation to obtain time-series EC data sets. Finally, the spatiotemporal pattern of EC in both UC and SR were explored. The results indicated that the proportion of EC in urban areas rose from 50.6% to 71.32%, with a growing trend of spatial autocorrelation. Cities with high urban EC were either located in the coastal region or belonged to provincial capitals. These cities experienced a moderate to a rapid growth of EC in both UC and SR, while a slow growth was detected for the majority of western and northeastern cities. The findings suggested that EC in SR was more crucial for sustainable energy development in China.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2489
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Author (down) Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L.
Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res
Volume 180 Issue Pages 108823
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.
Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702
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