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Author (down) Van der Westhuyzen, J.G.J., Leuschner, F.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of age on white light perception Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 29-43  
  Keywords Vision; Psychology  
  Abstract The way that persons from different age groups experience “white light” is investigated. Human eye lens transmission changes spectrally with age and this may influence the way that humans from different ages experiences light. Such a difference may be important in industrial and medical environments. Two different age groups, one group younger than 40 years of age and another group older than 50 years of age were subjected to the same “white” definition task.A conventional single-booth setup was used where observers were able to adjust the intensity of four coloured LED’s.Results of the psychophysical test procedure were used to generate specifications of two light sources, as selected by the two age groups. The two age groups selected different light sources when tasked to achieve a “perception” of white. Results show that the older group prefers a source with a colour rendering index number of 89 and the younger group prefers a source with a colour rendering index number of 74. The sources selectedby the two age groups specifycorrelated colour temperature values of 5150 K for the older age group and 6592 K for the younger group.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2065  
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Author (down) Vaaja, M. T., Kurkela, M., Maksimainen, M., Virtanen, J., Kukko, A., Lehtola, V. V., Hyyppä, J., & Hyyppä, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title MOBILE MAPPING OF NIGHT-TIME ROAD ENVIRONMENT LIGHTING CONDITIONS Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Photogrammetric Journal of Finland Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The measurement of 3D geometry for road environments is one of the main applications of mobile mapping systems (MMS). We present mobile mapping applied to a night-time road environment. We integrate the measurement of luminances into a georeferenced 3D point cloud. The luminance measurement and the 3D point cloud acquired with an MMS are used in assessing road environment lighting conditions. Luminance (cd/m2) was measured with a luminance-calibrated panoramic camera system, and point cloud was produced by laser scanners. The relative orientation between the GNSS, IMU, camera, and laser scanner sensors was solved in order to

integrate the data sets into the same coordinate system. Hence, the georeferenced luminance values are transferable into geographic information systems (GIS). The method provides promising results for future road lighting assessment. In addition, this article demonstrates the night-time mobile mapping principle applied to a road section in Helsinki, Finland. Finally, we discuss the

future applications of mobile-mapped luminance point clouds.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2650  
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Author (down) Uysal, C.; Maktav, D.; Small, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping Urban Growth and Its Relation to Seismic Hazards in Istanbul Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens  
  Volume 46 Issue 8 Pages 1307-1322  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In Istanbul, one of the most densely populated cities of Turkey, the population has grown rapidly over the last 30 years. In addition to being one of the rapidly flourishing cities in Europe, the city is positioned on the seismically active North Anatolian Fault (NAF). The form and rate of Istanbul’s fast urban growth has serious implications for seismic hazards. There have been some studies to map lateral urban growth for the city but they do not give satisfactory information about vertical urban growth and seismic hazards. We use DMSP night lights and Landsat data to map changes in land cover-land use in and around the city since 1984, and determine relations of these changes with the NAF. Changes in land use and intensity of development are identified by changes in night light brightness while changes in land cover are identified by changes in land surface reflectance. Aggregate changes in reflectance are represented as changes in subpixel mixtures of the most functionally and spectrally distinct spectral endmembers of land cover. Using standardized global endmembers, SVD composite images were produced for 1984, 2000 and 2011 and fraction change (δSVD) maps were produced for the decadal intervals. The results show that most of the urban expansion has occurred near the NAF. This has serious implications for seismic hazards in the future if the progression of large earthquakes continues to move westward toward the city.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2078  
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Author (down) Underhill, V.A.; Höbel, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) is robust to anthropogenic light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 124 Issue 8 Pages 537-548  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Human activities are drastically changing the amount of artificial light entering natural habitats. Because light pollution alters the sensory environment, it may interfere with behaviors ranging from prey detection and vigilance to mate choice. Here, we test the hypothesis that anthropogenic light pollution affects the mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor). We tested this hypothesis under two experimental light treatments that simulate the light pollution created by streetlights (expansion of lit areas and increased light intensity), and the light pollution created by headlights of passing vehicles (rapid fluctuations between bright and dark conditions). The hypothesis predicts that females tested under conditions simulating light pollution will show behavioral changes geared toward mitigating detection by predators, such as relaxed preferences, decreased choosiness for the normally preferred call, and differences in approach behavior (either more directional, faster, or stealthier movements, or no approach at all). Contrary to our prediction, we found that light pollution did not affect mate choice behavior in Gray Treefrogs, and should therefore neither interfere with population persistence nor affect the sexual selection regimes on male call traits of this species. However, we caution that this result does not imply that anthropogenic light pollution is of no concern for amphibian conservation, because behavioral responses to variation in nocturnal light levels (both in the natural as well as anthropogenically enhanced range) seem to be highly species‐specific in anurans. We encourage additional studies to help gage the vulnerability of anurans to anthropogenic light pollution.  
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  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2090  
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Author (down) Ulgezen, Z.N.; Kapyla, T.; Meerlo, P.; Spoelstra, K.; Visser, M.E.; Dominoni, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The preference and costs of sleeping under light at night in forest and urban great tits Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 286 Issue 1905 Pages 20190872  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing phenomenon associated with worldwide urbanization. In birds, broad-spectrum white ALAN can have disruptive effects on activity patterns, metabolism, stress response and immune function. There has been growing research on whether the use of alternative light spectra can reduce these negative effects, but surprisingly, there has been no study to determine which light spectrum birds prefer. To test such a preference, we gave urban and forest great tits (Parus major) the choice where to roost using pairwise combinations of darkness, white light or green dim light at night (1.5 lux). Birds preferred to sleep under artificial light instead of darkness, and green was preferred over white light. In a subsequent experiment, we investigated the consequence of sleeping under a particular light condition, and measured birds' daily activity levels, daily energy expenditure (DEE), oxalic acid as a biomarker for sleep debt and cognitive abilities. White light affected activity patterns more than green light. Moreover, there was an origin-dependent response to spectral composition: in urban birds, the total daily activity and night activity did not differ between white and green light, while forest birds were more active under white than green light. We also found that individuals who slept under white and green light had higher DEE. However, there were no differences in oxalic acid levels or cognitive abilities between light treatments. Thus, we argue that in naive birds that had never encountered light at night, white light might disrupt circadian rhythms more than green light. However, it is possible that the negative effects of ALAN on sleep and cognition might be observed only under intensities higher than 1.5 lux. These results suggest that reducing the intensity of light pollution as well as tuning the spectrum towards long wavelengths may considerably reduce its impact.  
  Address 5 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow , Glasgow , UK  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31213184; PMCID:PMC6599990 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2557  
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