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Author (down) Yulhendri, Y., Melati, I., Marna, J., & Softazia url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Analysis of the Economic Inequality of the Coast Regions Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Economics Development Analysis Journal Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 111-124  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract West and East coast of Sumatra are two different geographical and trade routes. The West Coast is connected with trade direction to India, Arabia and Africa while on the East Coast it is connected with trade in the Malacca Strait, East Asian economy. Based on photos of satellite images at night, the east coast has more light compared to the west coast. This study analyzed the differences in economic inequality between the economy of the population residing in the West Coast Region and the East Coast of Sumatra. This study took data sourced from the Indonesian Central Statistics Agency published in the last 5 years, 2013-2017. The data were processed using SPSS and Excel using the Williamson Index analysis tool. There are 23 Regencies / Cities in the West Coast and 23 Regencies / Cities in the East Coast analyzed where the West Coast average growth rate in the last 5 years is 5.17% and East Coast 5.48% with the Inequality index using the Williamson Index formula in West Coast 0.37 and East Coast 0.28. It was found that economic activity on the East Coast tends

to be more lively and higher economic growth with a low level of inequality compared to the West coast of Sumatra
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2960  
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Author (down) Yue, Y.; Tian, L.; Yue, Q.; Wang, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatiotemporal Variations in Energy Consumption and Their Influencing Factors in China Based on the Integration of the DMSP-OLS and NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Datasets Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages 1151  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract With the speedy growth of economic development, the imbalance of energy supply and demand pose a critical challenge for the energy security of our country. Meanwhile, the increasing and excessive energy consumption lead to the greenhouse effect and atmospheric pollution, greatly threatening the survival and development of human beings. This study integrated two nighttime light remote sensing datasets, namely Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) data and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data, to extend the temporal coverage of the study. Then, the distributions of China’s energy consumption from 1995 to 2016 at a 1-km resolution were estimated using different models and the spatiotemporal variations of energy consumption were explored on the basis of the best estimated results. Next, the factors influencing China’s energy intensity on the provincial level were investigated based on the spatial econometric model. The results show that: (1) The integrated nighttime light datasets can be successfully applied to estimate the dynamic changes of energy consumption. Moreover, the panel data model established in our research performed better than the quadratic polynomial model. (2) During the observation period, the energy consumption in China significantly increased, especially in the Yangtze River Delta, the Pearl River Delta, the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region, eastern coastal cities, and provincial capitals. (3) Different from the random spatial distribution pattern of energy consumption on the provincial level, the spatial distribution of energy consumption on the prefectural level has significant clusters, and its spatial agglomeration was strengthened year by year during the research period. (4) The spatial Durbin model (SDM) with a spatial fixed effect has been proved to be more suitable to explore the impact mechanism of China’s energy consumption. Among the four socio-economic factors, industrial structure has the greatest impact on the provincial energy intensity in China. Moreover, the changes in industrial structure and foreign direct investment (FDI) can not only influence the local energy intensity but also affect the energy intensity of the neighboring provinces.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2922  
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Author (down) Yue, F.; Xia, K.; Wei, L.; Xing, L.; Wu, S.; Shi, Y.; Man, L.S.; Shui, G.; Xiang, X.; Russell, R.; Zhang, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constant light exposure causes dysregulation of sphingolipids and promotes steatohepatitis in high-fat fed rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Abbreviated Journal J Gastroenterol Hepatol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; apoptosis; ceramide; light pollution; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; sphingolipids  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND AIM: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing public health concern worldwide. With the progression of urbanization, light pollution is becoming an inevitable risk factor for NAFLD. However, the role of light pollution on NAFLD is insufficiently understood, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present study explored effects of constant light exposure on NAFLD and elucidated its related mechanisms. METHODS: Thirty-two male SD rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8 each): 1) rats on a normal diet exposed to standard light-dark cycle (ND-LD); 2) rats on a normal diet exposed to constant light (ND-LL); 3) rats on a high fat diet exposed to standard light-dark cycle (HFD-LD); 4) and rats on a high fat diet exposed to constant light (HFD-LL). After 12 weeks treatment, rats were sacrificed and pathophysiological assessments were performed. Targeted lipidomics was used to measure sphingolipids, including ceramides, glucosylceramides and lactosylceramides, sphingomyelins and sphingosine-1-phosphates in plasma and liver tissues. RESULTS: In normal chow rats, constant light exposure led to glucose abnormalities and dyslipidemia. In high-fat fed rats, constant light exposure exacerbated glucose abnormalities, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, inflammation and aggravated steatohepatitis. Compared to HFD-LD rats, HFD-LL had decreased plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate and elevated liver concentrations of total ceramides and specific ceramide species (ceramide d18:0/24:0, ceramide d18:1/22:0, ceramide d18:1/24:0 and ceramide d18:1/24:1), and which were associated with increased hepatocyte apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Constant light exposure causes dysregulation of sphingolipids and promotes steatohepatitis in high-fat fed rats.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0815-9319 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32027419 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2829  
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Author (down) Yuan, X.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.; Zhou, J.; Chen, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Filtering the NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Improved Detection of Settlements in Africa Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 11 Issue 24 Pages 3002  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Observing and understanding changes in Africa is a hotspot in global ecological environmental research since the early 1970s. As possible causes of environmental degradation, frequent droughts and human activities attracted wide attention. Remote sensing of nighttime light provides an effective way to map human activities and assess their intensity. To identify settlements more effectively, this study focused on nighttime light in the northern Equatorial Africa and Sahel settlements to propose a new method, namely, the patches filtering method (PFM) to identify nighttime lights related to settlements from the National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) monthly nighttime light data by separating signal components induced by biomass burning, thereby generating a new annual image in 2016. The results show that PFM is useful for improving the quality of NPP-VIIRS monthly nighttime light data. Settlement lights were effectively separated from biomass burning lights, in addition to capturing the seasonality of biomass burning. We show that the new 2016 nighttime light image can very effectively identify even small settlements, notwithstanding their fragmentation and unstable power supply. We compared the image with earlier NPP-VIIRS annual nighttime light data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI) for 2016 and the Sentinel-2 prototype Land Cover 20 m 2016 map of Africa released by the European Space Agency (ESA-S2-AFRICA-LC20). We found that the new annual nighttime light data performed best among the three datasets in capturing settlements, with a high recognition rate of 61.8%, and absolute superiority for settlements of 2.5 square kilometers or less. This shows that the method separates biomass burning signals very effectively, while retaining the relatively stable, although dim, lights of small settlements. The new 2016 annual image demonstrates good performance in identifying human settlements in sparsely populated areas toward a better understanding of human activities.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2890  
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Author (down) Youngstedt, S.D.; Elliott, J.A.; Kripke, D.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human Circadian Phase-Response Curves for Exercise Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume 597 Issue 8 Pages 2253-2268  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Exercise  
  Abstract KEY POINTS: Exercise elicits circadian phase-shifting effects, but additional information is needed. The phase-response curve describing the magnitude and direction of circadian rhythm phase shifts depending on the time of the zeigeber (time cue) stimulus is the most fundamental chronobiological tool for alleviating circadian misalignment and related morbidity. 51 older and 48 young adults followed a circadian rhythms measurement protocol for up to 5.5 days, and performed 1 h of moderate treadmill exercise for 3 consecutive days at one of 8 times of day/night. Temporal changes in the phase of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) were measured from evening onset, cosine acrophase, morning offset, and duration of excretion, establishing significant PRCs for aMT6 onset and acrophase with large phase delays from 7-10 PM and large phase advances at both 7 AM and 1-4 PM. Along with known synergism with bright light, the above PRCs with a second phase advance region (afternoon) could support both practical and clinical applications. ABSTRACT: Although bright light is regarded as the primary circadian zeitgeber, its limitations support exploring alternative zeitgebers. Exercise elicits significant circadian phase-shifting effects, but fundamental information regarding these effects is needed. The primary aim of this study was to establish phase-response curves (PRC) documenting the size and direction of phase shifts in relation to the circadian time of exercise. Aerobically fit older (n = 51, 59-75 y) and young adults (n = 48, 18-30 y) followed a 90-min laboratory ultra-short sleep wake cycle (60 min wake/30 min sleep) for up to 5 (1/2) days. At the same clock time on three consecutive days, each participant performed 60 min of moderate treadmill exercise (65-75% of heart rate reserve) at one of 8 times of day/night. To describe PRCs, phase shifts were measured for the cosine-fitted acrophase of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), as well as for the evening rise, morning decline, and change in duration of aMT6s excretion. Significant PRCs were found for aMT6s acrophase, onset and duration, with peak phase advances corresponding to clock times of 7 AM and 1PM-4PM, delays from 7 PM-10 PM, and minimal shifts around 4 PM and 2 AM. There were no significant age or sex differences. The amplitudes of the aMT6s onset and acrophase PRCs are comparable to expectations for bright light of equal duration. The phase advance to afternoon exercise and the exercise-induced PRC for change in aMT6s duration are novel findings. The results support further research exploring additive phase shifting effects of bright light and exercise and health benefits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30784068 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2230  
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