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Author (up) Alaimo, A.; Linares, G.G.; Bujjamer, J.M.; Gorojod, R.M.; Alcon, S.P.; Martinez, J.H.; Baldessari, A.; Grecco, H.E.; Kotler, M.L.
Title Toxicity of blue led light and A2E is associated to mitochondrial dynamics impairment in ARPE-19 cells: implications for age-related macular degeneration Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Archives of Toxicology Abbreviated Journal Arch Toxicol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Vision
Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial retinal disease characterized by a progressive loss of central vision. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration is a critical event in AMD. It has been associated to A2E accumulation, which sensitizes RPE to blue light photodamage. Mitochondrial quality control mechanisms have evolved to ensure mitochondrial integrity and preserve cellular homeostasis. Particularly, mitochondrial dynamics involve the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion to preserve a healthy mitochondrial network. The present study aims to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying photodamage-induced RPE cell death with particular focus on the involvement of defective mitochondrial dynamics. Light-emitting diodes irradiation (445 +/- 18 nm; 4.43 mW/cm(2)) significantly reduced the viability of both unloaded and A2E-loaded human ARPE-19 cells and increased reactive oxygen species production. A2E along with blue light, triggered apoptosis measured by MC540/PI-flow cytometry and activated caspase-3. Blue light induced mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance towards mitochondrial fragmentation in both non-loaded and A2E-loaded cells which correlated with the deregulation of mitochondria-shaping proteins level (OPA1, DRP1 and OMA1). To our knowledge, this is the first work reporting that photodamage causes mitochondrial dynamics deregulation in RPE cells. This process could possibly contribute to AMD pathology. Our findings suggest that the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics may be a valuable strategy for treating retinal degeneration diseases, such as AMD.
Address Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Quimica Biologica Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (IQUIBICEN), CONICET-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellon 2, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428, Buenos Aires, Argentina. kotler@qb.fcen.uba.ar
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-5761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30778631 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2229
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Author (up) Almaida-Pagan, P.F.; Ortega-Sabater, C.; Lucas-Sanchez, A.; Martinez-Nicolas, A.; Espinosa, C.; Esteban, M.A.; Madrid, J.A.; Rol, M.; Mendiola, P.; de Costa, J.
Title Impact of a shift work-like lighting schedule on the functioning of the circadian system in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Experimental Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Exp Gerontol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract Adult Nothobranchius furzeri of the MZM-04/10 strain were individually kept and subjected to a “5+2” shifting lighting schedule (SHIFT) for 8weeks in order to evaluate the desynchronizing effects of a simulated human-like shift-work schedule on the functioning of the circadian system (CS). With this aim, sixteen 21-week-old N. furzeri were placed into a Morning, Night and Evening schedule (lights on from 08:00 to 16:00, 00:00 to 08:00 and 16:00 to 00:00h, respectively) and fed once a day in the middle of the corresponding photophase (12:00, 04:00 and 20:00h, respectively). Then, in the weekends (2days), fish were always returned to the Morning shift. As controls, 16 fish were maintained under a non-shifting LD cycle condition (CONTROL) throughout the whole experiment, with lights on from 08:00 to 16:00h. Rest-activity rhythm (RAR) of fish subjected to SHIFT showed several symptoms of chronodisruption, such as a decrease in the percentage of diurnal activity and a reduction of the relative amplitude and the circadian function index with time. When a periodogram analysis was performed, RAR of N. furzeri under SHIFT conditions showed up to three separate circadian components: one longer than 24h (26.5h) that followed the weekly 8h delays; a short-period component (~23h) that was related to the weekend's phase advances, and finally, a 24h component. The shifting LD schedule also affected fish CS at a molecular level, with several significant differences in the expression of core genes of the molecular clock (bmal1, clock, roralpha, rev-erbalpha) between SHIFT and CONTROL animals. RAR impairment along with changes in clock gene expression could be associated with high stress and accelerated aging in these fish.
Address Chronobiology Lab, Department of Physiology, College of Biology, University of Murcia, Mare Nostrum Campus, IUIE, IMIB-Arrixaca, Spain; Ciber Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0531-5565 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30184464 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1999
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Author (up) Amaral, S.; Câmara, G.; Monteiro, A.M.V.; Quintanilha, J.A.; Elvidge, C.D.
Title Estimating population and energy consumption in Brazilian Amazonia using DMSP night-time satellite data Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Computers, Environment and Urban Systems Abbreviated Journal Computers, Environment and Urban Systems
Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 179-195
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract This paper describes a methodology to assess the evidence of human presence and humanactivities in the Brazilian Amazonia region using DMSP/OLS night-time satellite sensorimagery. It consists on exploring the potential of the sensor data for regional studies analysingthe correlation between DMSP night-time light foci and population, and the correlation be-tween DMSP night-time light foci and electrical power consumption. In the mosaic of DMSP/OLS night-time light imagery from September 1999, 248 towns were detected from a total of749municıpiosin Amazonia. It was found that the night-time light foci were related to human presence in the region, including urban settlements, mining, industries, and civil construction,observed in ancillary Landsat TM and JERS imagery data. The analysis considering only thestate of Para revealed a linear relation (R2¼0:79) between urban population from the 1996census data and DMSP night-time light foci. Similarly, electrical power consumption for 1999was linearly correlated with DMSP night-time light foci. Thus the DMSP/OLS imagery can beused as an indicator of human presence in the analysis of spatial–temporal patterns in theAmazonia region. These results are very useful considering the continental dimension ofAmazonia, the absence of demographic information between the official population census(every 10 years), and the dynamics and complexity of human activities in the region. ThereforeDMSP night-time light foci are a valuable data source for global studies, modelling, and planning activities when the human dimension must be considered throughout Amazonia.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0198-9715 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2221
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Author (up) Amavilah, V.H.
Title Artificial nighttime lights and the “real” well-being of nations : “Measuring economic growth from outer space” and welfare from right here on Earth Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Economics and Political Economy Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 209-218
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract GDP remains too much of an imprecise measure of the standard of living. There

is a need for either substitutes or complements. Nighttime lights are a reasonable indicator of the extent, scale, and intensity of socio-economic activities, but a poor measure of national welfare. However, if nighttime lights are understood to constitute externalities, then their effects can be used to adjust measured growth for welfare. From that angle, nighttime lights appear to exert sub-optimal positive externalities in developing countries, and supra-optimal negative externality in developed countries. This means that even if we assume equal growth rates in developing and developed countries, welfare is enhanced by increasing nighttime lights in developing countries and reduced by increasing nighttime lights in developed countries.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2099
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Author (up) Arendt, J.; Middleton, B.
Title Human seasonal and circadian studies in Antarctica (Halley, 75 degrees S) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication General and Comparative Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Gen Comp Endocrinol
Volume 258 Issue Pages 250-258
Keywords Human Activities; Acclimatization/*physiology; Actigraphy; Adult; Antarctic Regions; Behavior/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Darkness; Female; Heart Rate/physiology; Humans; Libido; Light; Male; Melatonin/blood; Photoperiod; *Seasons; Sleep/physiology; Young Adult; *Antarctica; *Circadian; *Light; *Melatonin; *Seasonal
Abstract Living for extended periods in Antarctica exposes base personnel to extremes of daylength (photoperiod) and temperature. At the British Antarctic Survey base of Halley, 75 degrees S, the sun does not rise for 110 d in the winter and does not set for 100 d in summer. Photoperiod is the major time cue governing the timing of seasonal events such as reproduction in many species. The neuroendocrine signal providing photoperiodic information to body physiology is the duration of melatonin secretion which reflects the length of the night: longer in the short days of winter and shorter in summer. Light of sufficient intensity and spectral composition serves to suppress production of melatonin and to set the circadian timing and the duration of the rhythm. In humans early observations suggested that bright (>2000 lux) white light was needed to suppress melatonin completely. Shortly thereafter winter depression (Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD) was described, and its successful treatment by an artificial summer photoperiod of bright white light, sufficient to shorten melatonin production. At Halley dim artificial light intensity during winter was measured, until 2003, at a maximum of approximately 500 lux in winter. Thus a strong seasonal and circadian time cue was absent. It seemed likely that winter depression would be common in the extended period of winter darkness and could be treated with an artificial summer photoperiod. These observations, and predictions, inspired a long series of studies regarding human seasonal and circadian status, and the effects of light treatment, in a small overwintering, isolated community, living in the same conditions for many months at Halley. We found little evidence of SAD, or change in duration of melatonin production with season. However the timing of the melatonin rhythm itself, and/or that of its metabolite 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), was used as a primary marker of seasonal, circadian and treatment changes. A substantial phase delay of melatonin in winter was advanced to summer phase by a two pulse 'skeleton' bright white light treatment. Subsequently a single morning pulse of bright white light was effective with regard to circadian phase and improved daytime performance. The circadian delay evidenced by melatonin was accompanied by delayed sleep (logs and actigraphy): poor sleep is a common complaint in Polar regions. Appropriate extra artificial light, both standard white, and blue enriched, present throughout the day, effectively countered delay in sleep timing and the aMT6s rhythm. The most important factor appeared to be the maximum light experienced. Another manifestation of the winter was a decline in self-rated libido (men only on base at this time). Women on the base showed lower aspects of physical and mental health compared to men. Free-running rhythms were seen in some subjects following night shift, but were rarely found at other times, probably because this base has strongly scheduled activity and leisure time. Complete circadian adaptation during a week of night shift, also seen in a similar situation on North Sea oil rigs, led to problems readapting back to day shift in winter, compared to summer. Here again timed light treatment was used to address the problem. Sleep, alertness and waking performance are critically dependent on optimum circadian phase. Circadian desynchrony is associated with increased risk of major disease in shift workers. These studies provide some groundwork for countering/avoiding circadian desynchrony in rather extreme conditions.
Address Biochemistry and Physiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. Electronic address: b.middleton@surrey.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0016-6480 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28526480 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2248
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