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Author (up) Clayson, Hollis
Title Illuminated Paris, Essays on Art and Lighting in the Belle Époque Type Book Whole
Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords History; Society; Art
Abstract
Address Chicago
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Chicago Press Place of Publication Chicago Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 9780226593869 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2231
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Author (up) Cochard, P.; Galstian, T.; Cloutier, C.
Title The proportion of blue light affects parasitoid wasp behavior in LED-extended photoperiod in greenhouses: Increased parasitism and offspring sex ratio bias Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Biological Control Abbreviated Journal Biological Control
Volume 133 Issue Pages 9-17
Keywords Animals
Abstract The increasing use of specific wavelengths involving light-emitting diodes (LEDs) under greenhouses enables to overcome the lack of light during winter months, helping crops photosynthesis or vegetative growth. However, modification of the light environment as well as the photoperiod may also alter directly or indirectly the activity of both beneficial and pest insects that depend on plants. Here, we submitted the parasitic wasp Aphidius ervi and its main host the pea aphid, to 4 ratios of red(R): blue(B) LEDs used to lengthen the photoperiod inside a growth chamber. We recorded the parasitism rate of aphids and the sex ratio of newly emerged wasps to evaluate if A. ervi could remain an efficient biological control agent under modified light environments. We found that increasing the 8 h of photophase to 16 h by supplementing with R/B LEDs increased the daily parasitic activity of the wasp as well as their egg laying behavior. Under the 100R light supplement, about 80% of the emerged adults were males, against 50% under 25R:75B light treatment. These results indicate that A. ervi remains a good biological control agent when the light environment is modified. However, the use of red light to extend the photophase has the potential to negatively affect population dynamics of these parasitoids due to its male-bias impact on the sex ratio.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1049-9644 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2253
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Author (up) Coesfeld, J.; Anderson, S.; Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.; Schernthanner, H.; Kyba, C.
Title Variation of Individual Location Radiance in VIIRS DNB Monthly Composite Images Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages 1964
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract With the growing size and use of night light time series from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB), it is important to understand the stability of the dataset. All satellites observe differences in pixel values during repeat observations. In the case of night light data, these changes can be due to both environmental effects and changes in light emission. Here we examine the stability of individual locations of particular large scale light sources (e.g., airports and prisons) in the monthly composites of DNB data from April 2012 to September 2017. The radiances for individual pixels of most large light emitters are approximately normally distributed, with a standard deviation of typically 15–20% of the mean. Greenhouses and flares, however, are not stable sources. We observe geospatial autocorrelation in the monthly variations for nearby sites, while the correlation for sites separated by large distances is small. This suggests that local factors contribute most to the variation in the pixel radiances and furthermore that averaging radiances over large areas will reduce the total variation. A better understanding of the causes of temporal variation would improve the sensitivity of DNB to lighting changes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2129
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Author (up) Coulthard, E.; Norrey, J.; Shortall, C.; Harris, W.E.
Title Ecological traits predict population changes in moths Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume 233 Issue Pages 213-219
Keywords Animals
Abstract Understanding the ecological traits which predispose species to local or global extinction allows for more effective pre-emptive conservation management interventions. Insect population declines are a major facet of the global biodiversity crisis, yet even in Europe they remain poorly understood. Here we identify traits linked to population trends in ‘common and widespread’ UK moths. Population trend data from the Rothamsted Research Insect Survey spanning 40 years was subject to classification and regression models to identify common traits among species experiencing a significant change in occurrence. Our final model had an accuracy of 76% and managed to predict declining species on 90% of occasions, but was less successful with increasing species. By far the most powerful predictor associated for declines was moth wingspan with large species declining more frequently. Preference for woody or herbaceous larval food sources, nocturnal photoperiod activity, and richness of habitats occupied also proved to be significantly associated with decline. Our results suggest that ecological traits can be reliably used to predict declines in moths, and that this model could be used for Data Deficient species, of which there are many.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2260
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Author (up) Cravens, Z.M.; Boyles, J.G.
Title Illuminating the physiological implications of artificial light on an insectivorous bat community Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Global light pollution threatens to disturb numerous wildlife species, but impacts of artificial light will likely vary among species within a community. Thus, artificial lights may change the environment in such a way as to create winners and losers as some species benefit while others do not. Insectivorous bats are nocturnal and a good model to test for differential effects of light pollution on a single community. We used a physiological technique to address this community-level question by measuring plasma ss-hydroxybutyrate (a blood metabolite) concentrations from six species of insectivorous bats in lit and unlit conditions. We also recorded bat calls acoustically to measure activity levels between experimental conditions. Blood metabolite level and acoustic activity data suggest species-specific changes in foraging around lights. In red bats (Lasiurus borealis), ss-hydroxybutyrate levels at lit sites were highest early in the night before decreasing. Acoustic data indicate pronounced peaks in activity at lit sites early in the night. In red bats on dark nights and in the other species in this community, which seem to avoid lights, ss-hydroxybutyrate remained relatively constant. Our results suggest red bats are more willing to expend energy to actively forage around lights despite potential negative impacts, while other, generally rarer species avoid lit areas. Artificial light appears to have a bifurcating effect on bat communities, whereby some species take advantage of concentrated prey resources, yet most do not. Further, this may concentrate light-intolerant species into limited dark refugia, thereby increasing competition for depauperate, phototactic insect communities.
Address Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, 62901, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30446844 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2061
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