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Author (up) Cao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Yang, M.; Guo, B.; Liu, M.; Yang, L.; Qu, J.; Gao, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of Lighting Changes in the Tourist City Edogawa Using Nighttime Light Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens  
  Volume 46 Issue 10 Pages 1617-1623  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract When assessing remote sensing data, nighttime light data have shortcomings that can be attributed to sensor limitations and the influence of the natural environment. Signal leakage errors in nighttime light data were identified in this study. A regression model was created to reduce signal leakage error by selecting sampling points in coastal area. Lighting variations in Edogawa between 2008 and 2013 were compared based on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s nighttime light data. The lighting variation characteristics in Edogawa from 1992 to 2012 at 5-year intervals were also analyzed. The results show that the 2002 FIFA World Cup held in Japan led Edogawa’s light digital number values to peak in 2002. The annual Edogawa lighting changes from 2007 to 2013 were also explored. The 2008 global financial crisis led to the lowest compounded night light index and average digital number in Edogawa during these 7 years.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2079  
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Author (up) Caorsi, V.; Sprau, P.; Zollinger, S.A.; Brumm, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal resting behaviour in urban great tits and its relation to anthropogenic disturbance and microclimate Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 73 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The ecological novelty of urbanisation poses many challenges to animals. We investigated whether anthropogenic disturbance (artificial light at night and noise) and abiotic factors in cities (temperature and humidity) predict nocturnal activity and rest in free-living urban great tits (Parus major). Our study is the first to relate nocturnal rest in wild birds to levels of noise pollution during the night, an issue that has been shown to be particularly damaging to human health. Unlike previous work on nocturnal behaviour of urban birds, we considered the combined effect of anthropogenic disturbance and urban microclimate to acknowledge that the umwelt of an animal is composed of multiple environmental variables. Using infrared cameras, we observed the nocturnal resting behaviour as a proxy for sleep in 17 birds in nest boxes deployed across the city of Munich, Germany. Although we found marked differences in resting behaviour between individuals, this variation was not related to the measured environmental factors. This finding contrasts earlier studies that reported nocturnal resting behaviour of birds to vary with temperature and light exposure. Although we did not find evidence that urban environmental factors disrupt resting behaviour in great tits, their sleep might still be impaired by the anthropogenic disturbances. To elucidate this issue, further studies are necessary that, for instance, measure brain activity.  
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  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2185  
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Author (up) Carley J. S., Grabarczyk, E. E., Vonhof, M. J., & Gill, S. A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social factors, not anthropogenic noise or artificial light, influence onset of dawn singing in a common songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Auk: Ornithological Advances Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract With worldwide increases in artificial light and anthropogenic noise, understanding how these pollutants influence animals allows us to better mitigate potential negative effects. Both light and noise affect the timing of daily activities, including the onset of dawn song in birds, yet the influence of these pollutants compared with social factors that also influence song onset remains unknown. We investigated the onset of dawn song, testing hypotheses aimed at understanding the influences of light and noise pollution as well as male competition, pairing status, and breeding stage on timing of dawn singing by male House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Overall, models with social factors fit song onset data better than models with abiotic factors of noise and sky glow, and the highest ranking model included nesting stage, number of male neighbors, and temperature. Males began singing earlier when they were building nests and when mates were fertile than during later nesting stages. Males also sang earlier as the number of male neighbors increased. The timing of dawn song by male House Wrens appeared unaffected by day-to-day variation in light and noise pollution, with social factors having larger effects on the onset of daily behavior in this species.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2643  
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Author (up) Casasole, G.; Raap, T.; Costantini, D.; AbdElgawad, H.; Asard, H.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Neither artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise nor distance from roads are associated with oxidative status of nestlings in an urban population of songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 210 Issue Pages 14-21  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Increasing urbanization is responsible for road-related pollutants and causes an unprecedented increase in light and noise pollution, with potential detrimental effects for individual animals, communities and ecosystems. These stressors rarely act in isolation but studies dissecting the effects of these multiple stressors are lacking. Moreover, studies on urban stressors have mainly focused on adults, while exposure in early-life may be detrimental but is largely ignored. To fill this important knowledge gap, we studied if artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise and road-related pollution (using distance from roads as a proxy) explain variation in oxidative status in great tit nestlings (Parus major) in an urban population. Artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise and distance from roads were not associated with variation of the nine studied metrics of oxidative status (superoxide dismutase-SOD-, glutathione peroxidase-GPX, catalase-CAT-, non-enzymatic total antioxidant capacity-TAC-, reduced glutathione-GSH-, oxidized glutathione-GSSG-, ratio GSH/GSSG, protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances-TBARS). Interestingly, for all oxidative status metrics, we found that there was more variation in oxidative status among individuals of the same nest compared to between different nests. We also showed an increase in protein carbonyls and a decrease of the ratio GSH/GSSG as the day advanced, and an increase of GPX when weather conditions deteriorated. Our study suggests that anthropogenic noise, artificial light at night and road-related pollution are not the most important sources of variation in oxidative status in great tit nestlings. It also highlights the importance of considering bleeding time and weather conditions in studies with free-living animals.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology & Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28499963 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2457  
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Author (up) Chai, B.; Seto, K.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Conceptualizing and characterizing micro-urbanization: A new perspective applied to Africa Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning  
  Volume 190 Issue Pages 103595  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) require sustainable urban development and management for better human life quality. Small urban settlements—those with fewer than 500,000 people—are home to 26.5% of the world’s population. Yet, relatively little research attention has been paid to understanding the structure and dynamics of these smaller cities. In this paper, we propose a new concept, micro-urbanization, to fill this knowledge gap, and develop a methodology to characterize and map it using dense remote sensing time series data and landscape pattern metrics. We define micro-urbanization as a process of urban land change that has five primary characteristics: small, patchy, far from main urban areas, with limited geographic connection with existing urban areas and low urban intensity. We apply the method to two rapidly urbanizing countries in Africa, Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Results show that the methodology is capable of detecting micro-urbanization with relatively high spatial and temporal accuracy.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2581  
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