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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Díaz-Castro, J.; Serra-Ricart, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Restoring the night sky darkness at Observatorio del Teide: First application of the model Illumina version 2 Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 497 Issue 3 Pages 2501-2516  
  Keywords Skyglow; Teide Observatory; Tenerife; Spain; modeling; Illumina; numerical methods  
  Abstract The propagation of artificial light into real environments is complex. To perform its numerical modelling with accuracy, one must consider hyperspectral properties of the lighting devices and their geographic positions, the hyperspectral properties of the ground reflectance, the size and distribution of small-scale obstacles, the blocking effect of topography, the lamps angular photometry and the atmospheric transfer function (aerosols and molecules). A detailed radiative transfer model can be used to evaluate how a particular change in the lighting infrastructure may affect the sky radiance. In this paper, we use the new version (v2) of the Illumina model to evaluate a night sky restoration plan for the Teide Observatory located on the island of Tenerife, Spain. In the past decades, the sky darkness was severely degraded by growing light pollution on the Tenerife Island. In this work, we use the contribution maps giving the effect of each pixel of the territory to the artificial sky radiance. We exploit the hyperspectral capabilities of Illumina v2 and show how the contribution maps can be integrated over regions or municipalities according to the Johnson–Cousins photometric bands spectral sensitivities. The sky brightness reductions per municipality after a complete shutdown and a conversion to light-emitting diodes are calculated in the Johnson–Cousins B, V, R bands. We found that the conversion of the lighting infrastructure of Tenerife with LED (1800 and 2700 K), according to the conversion strategy in force, would result in a zenith V-band sky brightness reduction of ≈0.3 mag arcsec−2.  
  Address Département de physique, Cégep de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, 475 rue du Cégep, Sherbrooke, Québec J1E 4K1, Canada; martin.aube ( at ) cegepsherbrooke.qc.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3406  
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Author (up) Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.D.; Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Safran, J.; Strong, A.E.; Eakin, C.M.; Baugh, K.E.; Tuttle, B.T.; Howard, A.T.; Erwin, E.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Geocarto International Abbreviated Journal Geocarto International  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 467-479  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In this article, we present a satellite-based approach to gather information about the threat to coral reefs worldwide. Three chosen reef stressors – development, gas flaring and heavily lit fishing boat activity – are analysed using nighttime lights data derived from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) produced at the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, National Geophysical Data Center (NOAA/NGDC). Nighttime lights represent a direct threat to coral reef ecosystems and are an excellent proxy measure for associated human-caused stressors. A lights proximity index (LPI) is calculated, measuring the distance of coral reef sites to each of the stressors and incorporating the stressor's intensity. Colourized maps visualize the results on a global scale. Area rankings clarify the effects of artificial night lighting on coral reefs on a regional scale. The results should be very useful for reef managers and for state administrations to implement coral reef conservation projects and for the scientific world to conduct further research.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1010-6049 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3198  
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Connelly, F.; Johnsson, R.D.; Jones, T.M.; Mulder, R.A.; Hall, M.L.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title White and Amber Light at Night Disrupt Sleep Physiology in Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; anthropogenic; avian; blue light; circadian rhythms; electroencephalogram; light pollution; light spectra; sleep homeostasis; slow wave sleep; urbanization  
  Abstract Artificial light at night can disrupt sleep in humans [1-4] and other animals [5-10]. A key mechanism for light to affect sleep is via non-visual photoreceptors that are most sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light [11]. To minimize effects of artificial light on sleep, many electronic devices shift from white (blue-rich) to amber (blue-reduced) light in the evening. Switching outdoor lighting from white to amber might also benefit wildlife [12]. However, whether these two colors of light affect sleep similarly in different animals remains poorly understood. Here we show, by measuring brain activity, that both white and amber lighting disrupt sleep in birds but that the magnitude of these effects differs between species. When experimentally exposed to light at night at intensities typical of urban areas, domestic pigeons (Columba livia) and wild-caught Australian magpies (Cracticus tibicen tyrannica) slept less, favored non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep over REM sleep, slept less intensely, and had more fragmented sleep compared to when lights were switched off. In pigeons, these disruptive effects on sleep were similar for white and amber lighting. For magpies, however, amber light had less impact on sleep. Our results demonstrate that amber lighting can minimize sleep disruption in some birds but that this benefit may not be universal.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:32707063 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3080  
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Johnsson, R.D.; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light, Sleep and Performance in Diurnal Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 115-131  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract Sleep has a multitude of benefits and is generally considered necessary for optimal performance. Disruption of sleep by extended photoperiods, moonlight and artificial light could therefore impair performance in humans and non-human animals alike. Here, we review the evidence for effects of light on sleep and subsequent performance in birds. There is accumulating evidence that exposure to natural and artificial sources of light regulates and suppresses sleep in diurnal birds. Sleep also benefits avian cognitive performance, including during early development. Nevertheless, multiple studies suggest that light can prolong wakefulness in birds without impairing performance. Although there is still limited research on this topic, these results raise intriguing questions about the adaptive value of sleep. Further research into the links between light, sleep and performance, including the underlying mechanisms and consequences for fitness, could shed new light on sleep evolution and urban ecology.  
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  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3328  
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Lesku, J.A.; Mulder, R.A.; Goymann, W.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Streetlights Disrupt Night-Time Sleep in Urban Black Swans Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Front. Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; accelerometry; artificial light at night; blue light; EEG; elecrophysiology; light pollution, light spectra; black swan; Cygnus atratus  
  Abstract Artificial light at night could have widespread and detrimental impacts on sleep. To reduce disruptive effects of artificial light on sleep in humans, most smartphones and computers now have software that reduces blue light emissions at night. Little is known about whether reducing blue light emissions from city lights could also benefit urban wildlife. We investigated the effects of blue-rich (white) and blue-reduced (amber) LED streetlights on accelerometry-defined rest, electrophysiologically-identified sleep, and plasma melatonin in a diurnal bird, the black swan (Cygnus atratus). Urban swans were exposed to 20 full nights of each lighting type in an outdoor, naturalistic environment. Contrary to our predictions, we found that night-time rest was similar during exposure to amber and white lights but decreased under amber lights compared with dark conditions. By recording brain activity in a subset of swans, we also demonstrated that resting birds were almost always asleep, so amber light also reduced sleep at night. We found no effect of light treatment on total (24 h) daily rest or plasma melatonin. Our study provides the first electrophysiologically-verified evidence for effects of streetlights on sleep in an urban animal, and furthermore suggests that reducing blue wavelengths of light might not mitigate these effects.  
  Address School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; aulsebrooka ( at ) gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Frontiers Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-701X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3386  
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