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Author (up) Chen, Y.; Cheng, M.; Su, T.; Gao, T.; Yu, W.
Title Constant light exposure aggravates POMC-mediated muscle wasting associated with hypothalamic alteration of circadian clock and SIRT1 in endotoxemia rats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Biochem Biophys Res Commun
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Constant light exposure is widespread in the intensive care unit (ICU) and could increase the rate of brain dysfunction as delirium and sleep disorders in critical patients. And the activation of hypothalamic neuropeptides is proved to play a crucial role in regulating hypercatabolism, especially skeletal muscle wasting in critical patients, which could lead to serious complications and poor prognosis. Here we investigated the hypothesis that constant light exposure could aggravate skeletal muscle wasting in endotoxemia rats and whether it was associated with alterations of circadian clock and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin(POMC) expression. Fifty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide(LPS) or saline, subjected to constant light or a 12:12h light-dark cycle for 7 days. On day 8, rats were sacrificed across six time points in 24h and hypothalamus tissues and skeletal muscle were obtained. Rates of muscle wasting were measured by 3-methylhistidine(3-MH) and tyrosine release as well as expression of two muscle atrophic genes, muscle ring finger 1(MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box(MAFbx). The expression of circadian clock genes, silent information regulator 1(SIRT1), POMC and hypothalamic inflammatory cytokines were also detected. Results showed that LPS administration significantly increased hypothalamic POMC expression, inflammatory cytokine levels and muscle wasting rates. Meanwhile constant light exposure disrupted the circadian rhythm, declined the expression of SIRT1 as well as aggravated hypothalamic POMC overexpression and skeletal muscle wasting in rats with endotoxemia. Taken together, the results demonstrated that constant light exposure could aggravate POMC-mediated skeletal muscle wasting in endotoxemia rats, which is associated with alteration of circadian clocks and SIRT1 in the hypothalamus.
Address Department of Intensive Care Unit, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210008, China. Electronic address: yudrnj2@163.com
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ISSN 0006-291X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30528733 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2134
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Author (up) Chen, Z., Yu, B., Ta, N., Shi, K., Yang, C., Wang, C., Zhao, X., Deng, S., & Wu, J.
Title Delineating Seasonal Relationships Between Suomi NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light and Human Activity Across Shanghai, China Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The nighttime light (NTL) remote-sensing data have been widely applied in several applications for analyzing the urbanization process. The relationship between NTL intensity and human activity becomes a solid foundation for the applications using NTL data. However, there is no research, so far, revealing how the human activity seasonality could impact the seasonal change of NTL intensity. In this paper, a comparative analysis, box plot, and random forest algorithm were applied to NTL remote-sensing data and points of interest (POIs) data within Shanghai, China. The results show that in spring and autumn, the NTL is much brighter than that in summer and winter, especially within high human activity density area. The NTL intensity can be partly (approximately 40%) explained as the joint effects of the five POI categories. By analyzing the contributions of each POI category to NTL intensity, we found that the National Polar-Orbiting Partnership-Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) could be used to dig more information about gross domestic product (GDP) and traffic-based applications with consideration of NTL seasonality.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2542
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Author (up) Cherrie, J.W.
Title Shedding Light on the Association between Night Work and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Annals of Work Exposures and Health Abbreviated Journal Ann Work Expo Health
Volume 63 Issue 6 Pages 608–611
Keywords Commentary; Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; shift work
Abstract Shift work that involves circadian disruption has been classified as probably carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, although more recent epidemiological evidence is not consistent. Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain an association between night work and female breast cancer, but the most likely is suppression of the hormone melatonin by light exposure at night. Three articles recently published in this journal describe aspects of exposure to light during night work. These articles and other evidence suggest that nighttime light levels may not always be sufficient to affect melatonin production, which could in part explain the inconsistencies in the epidemiological data. There is need to improve the specificity and reliability of exposure assessments in future epidemiological studies of night shift workers.
Address Institute of Occupational Medicine, Research Avenue North, Edinburgh, UK
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2398-7308 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31175355 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2530
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Author (up) Cho, M., Park, R., Yoon, J., Choi, Y., Jeong, J. I., Labzovskii, L., Fu, J. S., Huang, K., Jeong, S., & Kim, B.
Title A missing component of Arctic warming: Black carbon from gas flaring Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Letters Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Gas flaring during oil extraction over the Arctic region is the primary source of warming-inducing aerosols (e.g., black carbon (BC)) with a strong potential to affect regional climate change. Despite continual BC emissions near the Arctic Ocean via gas flaring, the climatic impacts of BC related to gas flaring remain uncertain. Here, we present simulations of potential gas flaring using an earth system model with comprehensive aerosol physics that to show that increases in BC from gas flaring can potentially explain a significant fraction of Arctic warming. BC emissions from gas flaring over high latitudes contribute to locally confined warming over the source region, especially during the Arctic spring through BC-induced local albedo reduction. This local warming invokes remote and temporally lagging sea-ice melting feedback processes over the Arctic Ocean during winter. Our findings imply that a regional change in anthropogenic aerosol forcing is capable of changing Arctic temperatures in regions far from the aerosol source via time-lagged, sea-ice-related Arctic physical processes. We suggest that both energy consumption and production processes can increase Arctic warming.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2645
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Author (up) Choi, S. J., Park, H. R. & Joo, E. Y.
Title Effects of Light on Daytime Sleep in 12 Hours Night Shift Workers: A Field Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Korean Sleep Research Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-35
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Objectives: Night shift workers suffer from sleep and daytime disturbances due to circadian misalignment. To investigate the role of environmental light in daytime sleep following 12 h-night shift work. Methods: we enrolled 12 h-shift female nurses working at one university-affiliated hospital (n=10, mean age 26.6 years, shift work duration 3.8 years). This is a cross-over study to compare sleep between under light exposure (30 lux) and in the dark (<5 lux) following 12 h-night duty. Two sessions of experiments were underwent and the interval between sessions was about a month. Psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) had performed on awakening from sleep at each session and sleep-wake pattern had been monitored by actigraphy throughout the study period. Daytime sleep was also compared with night sleep of age-and gender matched daytime workers (n=10). Results: Sleep parameters and PVT scores were not different between two light conditions. Activities during sleep seemed to be more abundant under 30 lux condition than in the dark, which was not significant. Compared to night sleep, daytime sleep of shift workers was different in terms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Three shift workers showed sleep onset REM sleep and first REM sleep period was the longest during daytime sleep. Conclusions: Unexpectedly, daytime sleep of 12 h night shift workers was well-maintained regardless of light exposure. Early occurrence of REM sleep and shorter sleep latency during daytime sleep suggest that shift workers meet with misalignment of circadian rhythm as well as increased homeostatic sleep pressure drive.
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Language Korean Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2635
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