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Author (up) Chu, L., Oloo, F., Sudmanns, M., Tiede, D., Hölbling, D.,Blaschke, T., & Teleoaca, I.
Title Monitoring long-term shoreline dynamics and human activities in the Hangzhou Bay, China, combining daytime and nighttime EO data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Big Earth Data Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Shorelines are vulnerable to anthropogenic activities including urbanization, land reclamation and sediment loading. Shoreline changes may be a reflection of the degradation of coastal ecosystems because of human activities. Understanding the shoreline dynamics is, therefore, a topic of global concern. Earth observation data, such as multi-temporal satellite images, are an important resource for assessing changes in coastal ecosystems. In this research, we used Google Earth Engine (GEE) to monitor and map historical shoreline dynamics in the Hangzhou Bay in China where the Qiantang River flows into the East China Sea. Specifically, we aimed to capture and quantify both the spatial and temporal shoreline changes and to assess the link between anthropogenic activities and shoreline changes on the integrity of this coastal area. We implemented a Tasselled Cap analysis (TCA) on Landsat imagery from 1985 to 2018 in GEE to calculate the wetness coefficient. We then applied Otsu method for automatic image thresholding on the wetness coefficient to detect waterbodies and shoreline changes. Further, we adopted the nighttime light data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) from 1992 to 2013 as a proxy of human activities. The results show that in the hotspot areas, the shoreline has moved by more than 5 km in the last decades, accounting for approximately 900 km2 of land accretion. Within this area, the human activity, indicated by the intensity of nighttime light, increased significantly. The results of this work reveal the influence of human activities on the shoreline dynamics and can support policies that promote the sustainable use and conservation of coastal environments. Our methodology can be transferred and applied to other coastal zones in various regions and scaled up to larger areas.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2952
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Author (up) Ciach, M., & Fröhlich, A.
Title Ungulates in the city: light pollution and open habitats predict the probability of roe deer occurring in an urban environment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 513–523
Keywords Animals; ungulates; Poland; Europe; roe deer; Capreolus capreolus
Abstract Although large and medium-sized herbivorous mammals avoid urbanized areas, they have recently begun to colonize towns and cities. In general, ungulates continue to avoid the centres of urban areas, and utilize mainly their thinly built-up outskirts. While extension of urban development is preventing ungulates from penetrating the urban landscape, the influence of noise and light pollution on the occurrence of mammalian herbivores is still poorly understood. Hence, we investigated the hypothesis that habitat availability shapes the distribution of roe deer Capreolus capreolus and artificial lightening discourages them from penetrating the urban landscape. Roe deer was recorded on 37% of randomly selected sample plots (N = 60) located within the city of Kraków (S Poland). The occupied plots contained significantly more open habitats, woodland patches were larger in them, but proximity to rivers, and noise and light pollution were significantly lower. The logistic regression model revealed that an increasing area of open habitats was positively correlated with the probability of roe deer occurring. However, the artificial lighting at night was negatively correlated with the probability of the species occurring: the negative effect of light pollution was mitigated by the greater area of open habitats. Our study highlights the very considerable potential of light pollution as a predictor of the occurrence of large mammals in the urban landscape. We argue that urbanization and the related artificial lighting at night may be a factor preventing ungulates from penetrating potentially suitable habitats in urban areas.
Address Department of Forest Biodiversity, Institute of Forest Ecology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, University of Agriculture, Kraków, Poland; michal.ciach(at)ur.krakow.pl
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2305
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Author (up) Ciach, M.; Fröhlich, A.
Title Habitat type, food resources, noise and light pollution explain the species composition, abundance and stability of a winter bird assemblage in an urban environment Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosyst
Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 547-559
Keywords Animals
Abstract At present, urban areas cover almost 3% of the Earth’s terrestrial area, and this proportion is constantly increasing. Although urbanization leads to a decline in biodiversity, at the same time it creates extensive habitats that are exploited by an assemblage of organisms, including birds. The species composition and density of birds nesting in towns and cities are determined by the types of buildings, the structure and maturity of urban greenery, and habitat diversity. In contrast, the habitat traits shaping the community of birds wintering in urban areas are not known. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of habitat structure, food resources and the urban effects (pollution, noise, artificial light) on an assemblage of birds overwintering in an urban area. It was carried out in 2014 and 2015 in the city of Kraków (southern Poland), on 56 randomly chosen sample plots, in which the composition, density and interseasonal similarity of bird assemblage were assessed with line transect method. A total of 64 bird species (mean = 17.7 ± 4.9 SD species/plot) was recorded. The mean density was 89.6 ind./km ±63.3 SD. The most numerous species were Great Tit Parus major, Magpie Pica pica, Blackbird Turdus merula, Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus, Rook Corvus frugilegus, Fieldfare Turdus pilaris and House Sparrow Passer domesticus. Noise adversely affected species numbers and density, but artificial light acted positively on the density of birds and their interseasonal stability. The species richness and density of birds were also determined by the number of food sources available (e.g. bird-feeders). In addition, the greater the proportion of open areas, the fewer species were recorded. In contrast, the more urban greenery there was, the greater the density of the entire bird assemblage. Urban infrastructure (buildings, roads, refuse tips) had a positive effect on the interseasonal stabilization of the species composition of wintering birds. The results of this work indicate that the urban effect, i.e. noise and light pollution, apart from purely habitat factors, provide a good explanation for the species richness, density and stability of bird assemblage wintering in urban areas.
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ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2444
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Author (up) Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.
Title A portable wide-field instrument for mapping night sky brightness automatically Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication Memorie della Società Astronomica Italiana Abbreviated Journal Mem. S.A. It.
Volume 74 Issue 2 Pages 458-459
Keywords Instrumentation; all-sky; photometry; sky brightness
Abstract We present a portable automatic instrument for monitoring night sky brightness and atmospherical transparency in astronomical photometrical bands. Main requirements were: fast and automatic coverage of the entire sky, lightness, transportability and quick set-up in order to take measurements from more sites in the same night, easily available commercial components and software to be reproduced by any interested institution, included amateurs astronomers groups.
Address Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dell’Inquinamento Luminoso, Thiene, Italy
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Publisher Società Astronomica Italiana Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN 1824-016X ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2243
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Author (up) Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.
Title Toward an atlas of the number of visible stars Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume in press Issue Pages 107059
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Modelling techniques for the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere allow the computation of maps of artificial night sky brightness in any direction of the sky, involving a large number of details from satellite data. Cinzano et al. (2001a) introduced a method of mapping naked eye star visibility at the zenith from large areas based on satellite radiance measurements and Garstang models of the propagation of light pollution. It takes into account the altitude of each land area from digital elevation data, natural sky brightness in the chosen sky direction based on the Garstang approach, eye capability after Garstang and Schaefer, and atmospheric extinction in the visual photometric band. Here we discuss how to use these methods to obtain maps of the average number of visible stars when looking at the night sky hemisphere, finally answering, site by site, the question of how many stars are visible in the sky. This is not trivial, as the number of stars visible depends on the limiting magnitude in each direction in the sky, and this depends on sky brightness in that direction, atmospheric extinction at that zenith distance and the observer's visual acuity and experience. We present, as an example, a map of the number of visible stars in Italy to an average observer on clear nights with a resolution of approximately 1 km.
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ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2928
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