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Author (up) Cottam, C.
Title A shower of grebes Type Journal Article
Year 1929 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 80-81
Keywords Animals; Birds
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2424
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Author (up) Coughlin, M.; Stubbs, C.; Claver, C.
Title A daytime measurement of the lunar contribution to the night sky brightness in LSST’s ugrizy bands–initial results Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Experimental Astronomy Abbreviated Journal Exp Astron
Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 393-408
Keywords Moonlight
Abstract We report measurements from which we determine the spatial structure ofthe lunar contribution to night sky brightness, taken at the LSST site on Cerro Pachonin Chile. We use an array of six photodiodes with filters that approximate the LargeSynoptic Survey Telescope’su, g, r, i, z,andybands. We use the sun as a proxy forthe moon, and measure sky brightness as a function of zenith angle of the point onsky, zenith angle of the sun, and angular distance between the sun and the point onsky. We make a correction for the difference between the illumination spectrum of thesun and the moon. Since scattered sunlight totally dominates the daytime sky bright-ness, this technique allows us to cleanly determine the contribution to the (cloudless)night sky from backscattered moonlight, without contamination from other sourcesof night sky brightness. We estimate our uncertainty in the relative lunar night skybrightness vs. zenith and lunar angle to be between 0.3–0.7 mags depending on thepassband. This information is useful in planning the optimal execution of the LSSTsurvey, and perhaps for other astronomical observations as well. Although our pri-mary objective is to map out the angular structure and spectrum of the scattered lightfrom the atmosphere and particulates, we also make an estimate of the expected num-ber of scattered lunar photons per pixel per second in LSST, and find values that arein overall agreement with previous estimates.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0922-6435 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3039
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Author (up) Coughlin, M.; Stubbs, C.; Claver, C.
Title A daytime measurement of the lunar contribution to the night sky brightness in LSST’s ugrizy bands–initial results Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Experimental Astronomy Abbreviated Journal Exp Astron
Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 393-408
Keywords Night sky brightness; Moon; night sky; astronomy
Abstract We report measurements from which we determine the spatial structure of the lunar contribution to night sky brightness, taken at the LSST site on Cerro Pachon in Chile. We use an array of six photodiodes with filters that approximate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope’s u, g, r, i, z, and y bands. We use the sun as a proxy for the moon, and measure sky brightness as a function of zenith angle of the point on sky, zenith angle of the sun, and angular distance between the sun and the point on sky. We make a correction for the difference between the illumination spectrum of the sun and the moon. Since scattered sunlight totally dominates the daytime sky brightness, this technique allows us to cleanly determine the contribution to the (cloudless) night sky from backscattered moonlight, without contamination from other sources of night sky brightness. We estimate our uncertainty in the relative lunar night sky brightness vs. zenith and lunar angle to be between 0.3–0.7 mags depending on the passband. This information is useful in planning the optimal execution of the LSST survey, and perhaps for other astronomical observations as well. Although our primary objective is to map out the angular structure and spectrum of the scattered light from the atmosphere and particulates, we also make an estimate of the expected number of scattered lunar photons per pixel per second in LSST, and find values that are in overall agreement with previous estimates.
Address Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springerer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0922-6435 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3041
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Author (up) Coulthard, E.; Norrey, J.; Shortall, C.; Harris, W.E.
Title Ecological traits predict population changes in moths Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume 233 Issue Pages 213-219
Keywords Animals
Abstract Understanding the ecological traits which predispose species to local or global extinction allows for more effective pre-emptive conservation management interventions. Insect population declines are a major facet of the global biodiversity crisis, yet even in Europe they remain poorly understood. Here we identify traits linked to population trends in ‘common and widespread’ UK moths. Population trend data from the Rothamsted Research Insect Survey spanning 40 years was subject to classification and regression models to identify common traits among species experiencing a significant change in occurrence. Our final model had an accuracy of 76% and managed to predict declining species on 90% of occasions, but was less successful with increasing species. By far the most powerful predictor associated for declines was moth wingspan with large species declining more frequently. Preference for woody or herbaceous larval food sources, nocturnal photoperiod activity, and richness of habitats occupied also proved to be significantly associated with decline. Our results suggest that ecological traits can be reliably used to predict declines in moths, and that this model could be used for Data Deficient species, of which there are many.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2260
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Author (up) Cox, D.T.C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Dzurjak, S.A.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title National Scale Spatial Variation in Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 1591
Keywords Remote Sensing; United Kingdom; National parks; skyglow; VIIRS-DNB; albedo; landcover; light emissions; light pollution; protected areas; skyglow; sky brightness; urbanization
Abstract The disruption to natural light regimes caused by outdoor artificial nighttime lighting has significant impacts on human health and the natural world. Artificial light at night takes two forms, light emissions and skyglow (caused by the scattering of light by water, dust and gas molecules in the atmosphere). Key to determining where the biological impacts from each form are likely to be experienced is understanding their spatial occurrence, and how this varies with other landscape factors. To examine this, we used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band and the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, to determine covariation in (a) light emissions, and (b) skyglow, with human population density, landcover, protected areas and roads in Britain. We demonstrate that, although artificial light at night increases with human density, the amount of light per person decreases with increasing urbanization (with per capita median direct emissions three times greater in rural than urban populations, and per capita median skyglow eleven times greater). There was significant variation in artificial light at night within different landcover types, emphasizing that light pollution is not a solely urban issue. Further, half of English National Parks have higher levels of skyglow than light emissions, indicating their failure to buffer biodiversity from pressures that artificial lighting poses. The higher per capita emissions in rural than urban areas provide different challenges and opportunities for mitigating the negative human health and environmental impacts of light pollution.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK; d.t.c.cox(at )exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2920
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