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Author (up) Columella, L.J.M. url  openurl
  Title Of husbandry Type Journal Article
  Year 70 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Book 9 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Excerpt from Chapter 14, page 409 in the linked English translation:

...Therefore, at the time when the mallows blossom, when there is the greatest multitude of these butterflies, if a high brazen vessel, with a narrow neck like the mile-column, be placed in the evening among the bee-hives, and some light put down to the bottom of it, the butterflies gather together to it from all places; and, while they flutter about the small flame, they are scorched, because they can neither fly easily upward out of the narrow place, nor, on the other hand, can they retire at a greater distance from the fire, since they are surrounded by the sides of the brazen vessel: therefore they are consumed by the burning heat that is near them...
 
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Latin Summary Language English Original Title De re rustica  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2578  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Commons, J.R. url  openurl
  Title Municipal Electric Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 1897 Publication Abbreviated Journal Mun. Aff.  
  Volume 1 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary  
  Abstract  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2409  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cope, K.L.; Schook, M.W.; Benard, M.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to artificial light at night during the larval stage has delayed effects on juvenile corticosterone concentration in American toads, Anaxyrus americanus Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication General and Comparative Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Gen Comp Endocrinol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 113508  
  Keywords Animals; amphibian; anthropogenic light; carry-over effects; environmental stressor; glucocorticoid; predation  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is an environmental stressor that can disrupt individual physiology and ecological interactions. Hormones such as corticosterone are often responsible for mediating an organism's response to environmental stressors. We investigated whether ALAN was associated with a corticosterone response and whether it exacerbated the effects of another common stressor, predation. We tested for consumptive, non-consumptive, and physiological effects of ALAN and predator presence (dragonfly larvae) on a widespread amphibian, the American toad (Anaxyrus americanus). We found predators had consumptive (decreased survival) and non-consumptive (decreased growth) effects on larval toads. ALAN did not affect larval toads nor did it interact with the predator treatment to increase larval toad predation. Despite the consumptive and non-consumptive effects of predators, neither predators nor ALAN affected corticosterone concentration in the larval and metamorph life-stages. In contrast to studies in other organisms, we did not find any evidence that suggested ALAN alters predator-prey interactions between dragonfly larvae and toads. However, there was an inverse relationship between corticosterone and survival that was exacerbated by exposure to ALAN when predators were absent. Additionally, larval-stage exposure to ALAN increased corticosterone concentration in juvenile toads. Our results suggest the physiological effects of ALAN may not be demonstrated until later life-stages.  
  Address Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44016, USA. Electronic address: mfb38@case.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0016-6480 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32442544 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2931  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cottam, C. openurl 
  Title A shower of grebes Type Journal Article
  Year 1929 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 80-81  
  Keywords Animals; Birds  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2424  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Coulthard, E.; Norrey, J.; Shortall, C.; Harris, W.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ecological traits predict population changes in moths Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 233 Issue Pages 213-219  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Understanding the ecological traits which predispose species to local or global extinction allows for more effective pre-emptive conservation management interventions. Insect population declines are a major facet of the global biodiversity crisis, yet even in Europe they remain poorly understood. Here we identify traits linked to population trends in ‘common and widespread’ UK moths. Population trend data from the Rothamsted Research Insect Survey spanning 40 years was subject to classification and regression models to identify common traits among species experiencing a significant change in occurrence. Our final model had an accuracy of 76% and managed to predict declining species on 90% of occasions, but was less successful with increasing species. By far the most powerful predictor associated for declines was moth wingspan with large species declining more frequently. Preference for woody or herbaceous larval food sources, nocturnal photoperiod activity, and richness of habitats occupied also proved to be significantly associated with decline. Our results suggest that ecological traits can be reliably used to predict declines in moths, and that this model could be used for Data Deficient species, of which there are many.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2260  
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