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Author (up) Bowden, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Analysis of Factors Affecting Catches of Insects in Light-Traps Type Journal Article
  Year 1982 Publication Bulletin of Entomological Research Abbreviated Journal Bull. Entomol. Res.  
  Volume 72 Issue 4 Pages 535-556  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Analysis of published data on catches of insects in light-traps with a variety of light sources and of different designs showed that all conformed to the previously proposed model describing the functioning of a light-trap: catch = constant × where W = trap illumination and I = background illumination. Light-trap catches in differing cloud conditions and in open and woodland situations also varied as predicted by the model. A table of correction factors for different amounts of cloud cover is provided. The results are discussed in relation to use of light-traps and interpretation of light-trap data.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4853 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2589  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bowlby, G.M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Some Preliminary Investigations into the Effects of Light on Broilers Type Journal Article
  Year 1957 Publication World's Poultry Science Journal Abbreviated Journal Worlds Poult. Sci. J.  
  Volume 13 Issue 03 Pages 214-216  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0043-9339 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2426  
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Author (up) Boyce, P.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health  
  Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113  
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Author (up) Boyce, P.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The benefits of light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume 151 Issue Pages 356-367  
  Keywords Lighting; Society; Conservation  
  Abstract The use of light at night continues to increase. Simply put, this is because without light we are deprived of our premier sense, vision. By enabling vision the use of light at night delivers a number of benefits to people. Such benefits include greater safety for pedestrians and drivers, reduced fear of crime, more use of outdoor facilities after dark, enhanced economic growth and the creation of built and natural environments that are a source of beauty and entertainment. This suggests that the use of light at night is linked to some very basic human motivations which in turn means that people value such benefits and will not willingly abandon them. Fortunately, careful lighting design, soundly-based outdoor lighting standards and new lighting and sensor technology offer the possibility of providing the benefits of light at night while minimizing the impact on the environment.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2171  
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Author (up) Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol  
  Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 24  
  Keywords Moonlight; Plants  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.  
  Address UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817  
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