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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Borniger, J.C.; Gaudier-Diaz, M.M.; Hecmarie Melendez-Fernandez, O.; Pascoe, J.L.; Courtney DeVries, A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Acute exposure to low-level light at night is sufficient to induce neurological changes and depressive-like behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Mol Psychiatry
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human health; physiology; brain
Abstract The advent and wide-spread adoption of electric lighting over the past century has profoundly affected the circadian organization of physiology and behavior for many individuals in industrialized nations; electric lighting in homes, work environments, and public areas have extended daytime activities into the evening, thus, increasing night-time exposure to light. Although initially assumed to be innocuous, chronic exposure to light at night (LAN) is now associated with increased incidence of cancer, metabolic disorders, and affective problems in humans. However, little is known about potential acute effects of LAN. To determine whether acute exposure to low-level LAN alters brain function, adult male, and female mice were housed in either light days and dark nights (LD; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 0 lux) or light days and low level light at night (LAN; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 5 lux). Mice exposed to LAN on three consecutive nights increased depressive-like responses compared to mice housed in dark nights. In addition, female mice exposed to LAN increased central tendency in the open field. LAN was associated with reduced hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in both male and female mice, as well as increased VEGFR1 and interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in females, and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in males. Further, LAN significantly altered circadian rhythms (activity and temperature) and circadian gene expression in female and male mice, respectively. Altogether, this study demonstrates that acute exposure to LAN alters brain physiology and can be detrimental to well-being in otherwise healthy individuals.
Address Department of Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1359-4184 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31138889 Approved no
Call Number (down) IDA @ john @ Serial 2509
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Author Falchi, F.; Furgoni, R.; Gallaway, T.A.; Rybnikova, N.A.; Portnov, B.A.; Baugh, K.; Cinzano, P.; Elvidge, C.D.
Title Light pollution in USA and Europe: The good, the bad and the ugly Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Management
Volume 248 Issue Pages 109227
Keywords
Abstract Light pollution is a worldwide problem that has a range of adverse effects on human health and natural eco-systems. Using data from the New World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, VIIRS-recorded radiance and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) data, we compared light pollution levels, and the light flux to the population size and GDP at the State and County levels in the USA and at Regional (NUTS2) and Province (NUTS3) levels inEurope. We found 6800-fold differences between the most and least polluted regions in Europe, 120-fold differences in their light flux per capita, and 267-fold differences influx per GDP unit. Yet, we found even greater differences between US counties: 200,000-fold differences in sky pollution, 16,000-fold differences in light flux per capita, and 40,000-fold differences in light flux per GDP unit. These findings may inform policy-makers, helping to reduce energy waste and adverse environmental, cultural and health consequences associated with light pollution.
Address STIL – Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dell'Inquinamento Luminoso, Light Pollution Science and Technology Institute, Thiene, Italy; Italy. falchi@lightpollution.it(at)istil.it
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) IDA @ john @ Serial 2593
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Author Zhu, Y.; Xu, D.; Saleem, A.; Ma, R.; Cheng, J.
Title Can Nighttime Light Data Be Used to Estimate Electric Power Consumption? New Evidence from Causal-Effect Inference Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Energies Abbreviated Journal Energies
Volume 12 Issue 16 Pages 3154
Keywords Society; electric power consumption; nighttime light data; panel econometrics; panel Granger causality
Abstract Nighttime light data are often used to estimate some socioeconomic indicators, such as energy consumption, GDP, population, etc. However, whether there is a causal relationship between them needs further study. In this paper, we propose a causal-effect inference method to test whether nighttime light data are suitable for estimating socioeconomic indicators. Data on electric power consumption and nighttime light intensity in 77 countries were used for the empirical research. The main conclusions are as follows: First, nighttime light data are more appropriate for estimating electric power consumption in developing countries, such as China, India, and others. Second, more latent factors need to be added into the model when estimating the power consumption of developed countries using nighttime light data. Third, the light spillover effect is relatively strong, which is not suitable for estimating socioeconomic indicators in the contiguous regions between developed countries and developing countries, such as Spain, Turkey, and others. Finally, we suggest that more attention should be paid in the future to the intrinsic logical relationship between nighttime light data and socioeconomic indicators.
Address School of Economics and Management, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China; xdy(at)cug.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1996-1073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) IDA @ john @ Serial 2614
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Author Schirmer, A.E.; Gallemore, C.; Liu, T.; Magle, S.; DiNello, E.; Ahmed, H.; Gilday, T.
Title Mapping behaviorally relevant light pollution levels to improve urban habitat planning Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1-13
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing; Society; remote sensing; cities; Urban planning; urban wildlife; urban ecology
Abstract Artificial nighttime lights have important behavioral and ecological effects on wildlife. Combining laboratory and field techniques, we identified behaviorally relevant levels of nighttime light and mapped the extent of these light levels across the city of Chicago. We began by applying a Gaussian finite mixture model to 998 sampled illumination levels around Chicago to identify clusters of light levels. A simplified sample of these levels was replicated in the laboratory to identify light levels at which C57BL/6J mice exhibited altered circadian activity patterns. We then used camera trap and high-altitude photographic data to compare our field and laboratory observations, finding activity pattern changes in the field consistent with laboratory observations. Using these results, we mapped areas across Chicago exposed to estimated illumination levels above the value associated with statistically significant behavioral changes. Based on this measure, we found that as much as 36% of the greenspace in the city is in areas illuminated at levels greater than or equal to those at which we observe behavioral differences in the field and in the laboratory. Our findings provide evidence that artificial lighting patterns may influence wildlife behavior at a broad scale throughout urban areas, and should be considered in urban habitat planning.
Address Northeastern Illinois University, Dept. of Biology, 5500 St. Louis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60625, USA; a-schirmer(at) neiu.edu)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) IDA @ john @ Serial 2615
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Author Elvidge, C. D.; Erwin, E.H.; Baugh, K.E.; Ziskin, D.; Tuttle, B.T.; Ghosh, T.; Sutton, P.C.
Title Overview of DMSP nightime lights and future possibilities Type Conference Article
Year 2009 Publication Joint Urban Remote Sensing Event Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; Night lights
Abstract The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to collect low-light imaging data of the earth at night. The OLS and its predecessors have collected this style of data on a nightly global basis since 1972. The digital archive of OLS data extends back to 1992. Over the years several global nighttime lights products have been generated. NGDC has now produced a set of global cloud-free nighttime lights products, specifically processed for the detection of changes in lighting emitted by human settlements, spanning 1992-93 to 2008. While the OLS is far from ideal for observing nighttime lights, the DMSP nighttime lights products have been successfully used in modeling the spatial distribution of population density, carbon emissions, and economic activity.
Address Earth Observation Group NOAA National Geophysical Data Center Boulder, Colorado 80305 USA; chris.elvidge(at)noaa.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IEEE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2334-0932 ISBN 978-1-4244-3461-9 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) IDA @ john @ Serial 2668
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