toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Garstang, R. H. url  openurl
  Title Limiting visual magnitude and night sky brightness Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Memorie della Società Astronomia Italiana Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 71 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract We review the theory of visual thresholds and applications to the limiting magnitude of a telescope and of the eyes, based on Schaefers's model with minor improvements. We apply out formulation to the Yerkes Observatory refractor and to naked eye observations at Mount Wilson Observatory. We reanalyze Bowen's telescopic observations at Mount Wilson by his approximate method and by our more elaborate theory. An extension of his method leads to a determination of the night sky brightness of the visual activity of the observer is assumed to be average. Our more elaborate method allows a determination of the sky brightness, the visual acuity of the observer, and the average seeing during the observations.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2623  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Simons, K. S., van den Boogaard, M., & de Jager, C. P. C. url  openurl
  Title Impact of intensive care unit light and noise exposure on critically ill patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Neth j crit care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Recently, the importance of the ICU environment as a potential modifiable factor for improvement of patient care has become more clear. In this review, we describe the effects of light and noise exposure on ICU patients. In ICU patients circadian rhythms and sleep are severely disturbed, which may increase the risk of delirium. Realignment of circadian rhythmicity by means of artificial light therapy has not been shown to reduce the incidence or duration of delirium. Prudent use of nighttime light may be a first step in improvement of patient sleep. Eye masks appear to improve sleep although they are only applicable for a selected group of patients. Noise levels in the ICU are above recommended standards. Negative effects include disturbances of sleep, as often encountered in ICU patients. Staff activity and talking contribute substantially to the total acoustic energy, providing opportunities to adapt behaviour and/or workflow in order to reduce noise pollution.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2624  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Donker, D. W. url  openurl
  Title Light and noise nuisance … deciphered yet underappreciated ‘Rosetta Stone’ of the modern ICU? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Netherlands Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 144  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health; hospitals; Department of Intensive Care Unit; health care  
  Abstract In everyday life, we take for granted that public authorities protect us from an unhealthy environment, including light and noise pollution. In recent years, about 1200 kilometres of noise barriers have been built alongside Dutch highways with costs approaching a billion euros. Also, more than 50 cities in the Netherlands have successfully taken initiatives to reduce the artificial light pollution in the past six years, as our country is well known to rank among the literally most illuminated ones in the world. These investments seem to be reasonable as adverse health effects from environmental light and noise pollution have long and widely been recognised. How these potentially detrimental effects of artificial light and distressing noise acting on the human body translate into the best possible care that we strive to provide within our modern ICU environment is an area of increasing professional awareness, interest and research. Yet, we all realise that not only light and noise, but numerous physical and psychological stressors may negatively affect individual ICU patients. Also, the impact of these factors may vary considerably among individuals, which makes it even more difficult for caregivers to prioritise among apparently competing aspects of care in their daily practice. A comprehensive, narrative review by Koen Simons and colleagues in this issue of the Netherlands Journal of Critical Care provides us with up-to-date information on the ‘impact of intensive care unit light and noise exposure on critically ill patients’.Here, we gain more insights and learn how a multimodal approach to our ICU environment may aid to optimise light exposure and reduce noise. This may not only improve our patients’ sleep and general wellbeing, but also

reduce the incidence of delirium. The latter seems especially relevant since the pharmacological prevention of delirium has repeatedly been shown to be disappointing, as recently confirmed again in a large Dutch trial. All this evidence sets the stage to further promote nonpharmacological interventions in the ICU to prevent delirium. Therefore, we should do our best to limit controllable stressors in the ICU in order to improve patient comfort and hopefully enhance the individual prognosis. As our traditional focus on the medical and technical aspects of critical care has led us to asymptotically reach current therapeutic optima; human factors and soft skills are no longer far in the horizon of the modern ICU.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher NJCC Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2625  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kinzey, B. R.; Smalley, E.; Ghosh, S.; Tuenge, J. R.; Pipkin, A.; Trevino, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting and Power Upgrade Recommendations for U.S. National Park Service Caribbean Units Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication National Park Service Caribbean Units Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Conservation; Ecology; Skyglow; Planning  
  Abstract The U.S. National Park Service (NPS) maintains and operates numerous park units along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, extending into the Caribbean to Commonwealth territories like Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). Several of these units were in the direct path of hurricanes Irma and Maria during the 2017 hurricane season and suffered considerable damage, including power outages, structural damage, and destroyed equipment. In February 2018, a task force deployed to three locations in the Caribbean to assess hurricane damage to the existing lighting systems and energy infrastructure. The primary objective was providing related recommendations for resiliency upgrades to the lighting and electrical supply systems, with special added emphasis on the numerous goals, objectives, and requirements of the NPS (such as protecting night skies, wildlife, wilderness character, cultural resources, etc.). Numerous opportunities exist for simultaneously increasing resiliency and preserving natural environments within these sensitive locations, and technological approaches that work in the extreme conditions encountered here should readily translate to many other less complex sites across the greater park system. Ultimately, care and attention to detail in implementation are the most important underlying requirements for success across the myriad needs likely encountered at these sites, once commitment to resolving them has been secured  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher U.S. Department of Energy Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2626  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Otchia, C. S. & Asongu, S. A. url  openurl
  Title Industrial Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Machine Learning with Insights from Nightlight Satellite Images Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication African Governance and Development Institute Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This study uses nightlight time data and machine learning techniques to predict industrial development in Africa. The results provide the first evidence on how machine learning techniques and nightlight data can be used to predict economic development in places where subnational data are missing or not precise. Taken together, the research confirms four groups of important determinants of industrial growth: natural resources, agriculture growth, institutions, and manufacturing imports. Our findings indicate that Africa should follow a more

multisector approach for development, putting natural resources and agriculture productivity growth at the forefront.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2627  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: