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Author Uysal, C.; Maktav, D.; Small, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping Urban Growth and Its Relation to Seismic Hazards in Istanbul Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens  
  Volume 46 Issue 8 Pages 1307-1322  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In Istanbul, one of the most densely populated cities of Turkey, the population has grown rapidly over the last 30 years. In addition to being one of the rapidly flourishing cities in Europe, the city is positioned on the seismically active North Anatolian Fault (NAF). The form and rate of Istanbul’s fast urban growth has serious implications for seismic hazards. There have been some studies to map lateral urban growth for the city but they do not give satisfactory information about vertical urban growth and seismic hazards. We use DMSP night lights and Landsat data to map changes in land cover-land use in and around the city since 1984, and determine relations of these changes with the NAF. Changes in land use and intensity of development are identified by changes in night light brightness while changes in land cover are identified by changes in land surface reflectance. Aggregate changes in reflectance are represented as changes in subpixel mixtures of the most functionally and spectrally distinct spectral endmembers of land cover. Using standardized global endmembers, SVD composite images were produced for 1984, 2000 and 2011 and fraction change (δSVD) maps were produced for the decadal intervals. The results show that most of the urban expansion has occurred near the NAF. This has serious implications for seismic hazards in the future if the progression of large earthquakes continues to move westward toward the city.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2078  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Yang, M.; Guo, B.; Liu, M.; Yang, L.; Qu, J.; Gao, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of Lighting Changes in the Tourist City Edogawa Using Nighttime Light Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens  
  Volume 46 Issue 10 Pages 1617-1623  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract When assessing remote sensing data, nighttime light data have shortcomings that can be attributed to sensor limitations and the influence of the natural environment. Signal leakage errors in nighttime light data were identified in this study. A regression model was created to reduce signal leakage error by selecting sampling points in coastal area. Lighting variations in Edogawa between 2008 and 2013 were compared based on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s nighttime light data. The lighting variation characteristics in Edogawa from 1992 to 2012 at 5-year intervals were also analyzed. The results show that the 2002 FIFA World Cup held in Japan led Edogawa’s light digital number values to peak in 2002. The annual Edogawa lighting changes from 2007 to 2013 were also explored. The 2008 global financial crisis led to the lowest compounded night light index and average digital number in Edogawa during these 7 years.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2079  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gonzalez, M.M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim Light at Night and Constant Darkness: Two Frequently Used Lighting Conditions That Jeopardize the Health and Well-being of Laboratory Rodents Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 609  
  Keywords Animals; Review  
  Abstract The influence of light on mammalian physiology and behavior is due to the entrainment of circadian rhythms complemented with a direct modulation of light that would be unlikely an outcome of circadian system. In mammals, physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. This central control allows organisms to predict and anticipate environmental change, as well as to coordinate different rhythmic modalities within an individual. In adult mammals, direct retinal projections to the SCN are responsible for resetting and synchronizing physiological and behavioral rhythms to the light-dark (LD) cycle. Apart from its circadian effects, light also has direct effects on certain biological functions in such a way that the participation of the SCN would not be fundamental for this network. The objective of this review is to increase awareness, within the scientific community and commercial providers, of the fact that laboratory rodents can experience a number of adverse health and welfare outcomes attributed to commonly-used lighting conditions in animal facilities during routine husbandry and scientific procedures, widely considered as “environmentally friendly.” There is increasing evidence that exposure to dim light at night, as well as chronic constant darkness, challenges mammalian physiology and behavior resulting in disrupted circadian rhythms, neural death, a depressive-behavioral phenotype, cognitive impairment, and the deregulation of metabolic, physiological, and synaptic plasticity in both the short and long terms. The normal development and good health of laboratory rodents requires cyclical light entrainment, adapted to the solar cycle of day and night, with null light at night and safe illuminating qualities during the day. We therefore recommend increased awareness of the limited information available with regards to lighting conditions, and therefore that lighting protocols must be taken into consideration when designing experiments and duly highlighted in scientific papers. This practice will help to ensure the welfare of laboratory animals and increase the likelihood of producing reliable and reproducible results.  
  Address Seccion Cronobiologia y Sueno, Instituto Ferrero de Neurologia y Sueno, Buenos Aires, Argentina  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30116218; PMCID:PMC6084421 Approved no  
  Call Number (down) NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2084  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eccard, J.A.; Scheffler, I.; Franke, S.; Hoffmann, J.; Leather, S.; Stewart, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Off-grid: solar powered LED illumination impacts epigeal arthropods Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Insect Conservation and Diversity Abbreviated Journal Insect Conserv Divers  
  Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages 600-607  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Advances in LED technology combined with solar, storable energy bring light to places remote from electricity grids. Worldwide more than 1.3 billion of people are living off‐grid, often in developing regions of high insect biodiversity. In developed countries, dark refuges for wildlife are threatened by ornamental garden lights. Solar powered LEDs (SPLEDs) are cheaply available, dim, and often used to illuminate foot paths, but little is known on their effects on ground living (epigeal) arthropods.

We used off‐the‐shelf garden lamps with a single ‘white’ LED (colour temperature 7250 K) to experimentally investigate effects on attraction and nocturnal activity of ground beetles (Carabidae).

We found two disparate and species‐specific effects of SPLEDs. (i) Some nocturnal, phototactic species were not reducing activity under illumination and were strongly attracted to lamps (>20‐fold increase in captures compared to dark controls). Such species aggregate in lit areas and SPLEDs may become ecological traps, while the species is drawn from nearby, unlit assemblages. (ii) Other nocturnal species were reducing mobility and activity under illumination without being attracted to light, which may cause fitness reduction in lit areas.

Both reactions offer mechanistic explanations on how outdoor illumination can change population densities of specific predatory arthropods, which may have cascading effects on epigeal arthropod assemblages. The technology may thus increase the area of artificial light at night (ALAN) impacting insect biodiversity.

Measures are needed to mitigate effects, such as adjustment of light colour temperature and automated switch‐offs.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1752458X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2085  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.; Lewis, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night causes top-down and bottom-up trophic effects on invertebrate populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol  
  Volume 55 Issue 6 Pages 2698-2706  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants  
  Abstract Globally, many ecosystems are exposed to artificial light at night. Nighttime lighting has direct biological impacts on species at all trophic levels. However, the effects of artificial light on biotic interactions remain, for the most part, to be determined.

We exposed experimental mesocosms containing combinations of grassland plants and invertebrate herbivores and predators to illumination at night over a 3‐year period to simulate conditions under different common forms of street lighting.

We demonstrate both top‐down (predation‐controlled) and bottom‐up (resource‐controlled) impacts of artificial light at night in grassland communities. The impacts on invertebrate herbivore abundance were wavelength‐dependent and mediated via other trophic levels.

White LED lighting decreased the abundance of a generalist herbivore mollusc by 55% in the presence of a visual predator, but not in its absence, while monochromatic amber light (with a peak wavelength similar to low‐pressure sodium lighting) decreased abundance of a specialist herbivore aphid (by 17%) by reducing the cover and flower abundance of its main food plant in the system. Artificial white light also significantly increased the food plant's foliar carbon to nitrogen ratio.

We conclude that exposure to artificial light at night can trigger ecological effects spanning trophic levels, and that the nature of such impacts depends on the wavelengths emitted by the lighting technology employed.

Policy implications. Our results confirm that artificial light at night, at illuminance levels similar to roadside vegetation, can have population effects mediated by both top‐down and bottom‐up effects on ecosystems. Given the increasing ubiquity of light pollution at night, these impacts may be widespread in the environment. These results underline the importance of minimizing ecosystem disruption by reducing light pollution in natural and seminatural ecosystems.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2086  
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