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Author Chellappa, S.L.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.; Lang, D.; Gotz, T.; Krebs, J.; Cajochen, C.
Title Acute exposure to evening blue-enriched light impacts on human sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Res
Volume 22 Issue 5 Pages 573-580
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light in the short wavelength range (blue light: 446-483 nm) elicits direct effects on human melatonin secretion, alertness and cognitive performance via non-image-forming photoreceptors. However, the impact of blue-enriched polychromatic light on human sleep architecture and sleep electroencephalographic activity remains fairly unknown. In this study we investigated sleep structure and sleep electroencephalographic characteristics of 30 healthy young participants (16 men, 14 women; age range 20-31 years) following 2 h of evening light exposure to polychromatic light at 6500 K, 2500 K and 3000 K. Sleep structure across the first three non-rapid eye movement non-rapid eye movement – rapid eye movement sleep cycles did not differ significantly with respect to the light conditions. All-night non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalographic power density indicated that exposure to light at 6500 K resulted in a tendency for less frontal non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic power density, compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K. The dynamics of non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic slow wave activity (2.0-4.0 Hz), a functional index of homeostatic sleep pressure, were such that slow wave activity was reduced significantly during the first sleep cycle after light at 6500 K compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K, particularly in the frontal derivation. Our data suggest that exposure to blue-enriched polychromatic light at relatively low room light levels impacts upon homeostatic sleep regulation, as indexed by reduction in frontal slow wave activity during the first non-rapid eye movement episode.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-1105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23509952 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2201
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Author Phipps-Nelson, J.; Redman, J.R.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.
Title Blue light exposure reduces objective measures of sleepiness during prolonged nighttime performance testing Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 891-912
Keywords Human Health
Abstract This study examined the effects of nocturnal exposure to dim, narrowband blue light (460 nm, approximately 1 lux, 2 microW/cm2), compared to dim broad spectrum (white) ambient light ( approximately 0.2 lux, 0.5 microW/cm2), on subjective and objective indices of sleepiness during prolonged nighttime performance testing. Participants were also exposed to a red light (640 nm, approximately 1 lux, 0.7 microW/cm2) placebo condition. Outcome measures were driving simulator and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance, subjective sleepiness, salivary melatonin, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. The study had a repeated-measures design, with three counterbalanced light conditions and a four-week washout period between each condition. Participants (n = 8) maintained a regular sleep-wake schedule for 14 days prior to the approximately 14 h laboratory study, which consisted of habituation to light conditions followed by neurobehavioral performance testing from 21:00 to 08:30 h under modified constant-routine conditions. A neurobehavioral test battery (2.5 h) was presented four times between 21:00 and 08:30 h, with a 30 min break between each. From 23:30 to 05:30 h, participants were exposed to blue or red light, or remained in ambient conditions. Compared to ambient light exposure, blue light exposure suppressed EEG slow wave delta (1.0-4.5 Hz) and theta (4.5-8 Hz) activity and reduced the incidence of slow eye movements. PVT reaction times were significantly faster in the blue light condition, but driving simulator measures, subjective sleepiness, and salivary melatonin levels were not significantly affected by blue light. Red light exposure, as compared to ambient light exposure, reduced the incidence of slow eye movements. The results demonstrate that low-intensity, blue light exposure can promote alertness, as measured by some of the objective indices used in this study, during prolonged nighttime performance testing. Low intensity, blue light exposure has the potential to be applied to situations where it is desirable to increase alertness but not practical or appropriate to use bright light, such as certain occupational settings.
Address School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19637049 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2202
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Author Rahman, S.A.; Bibbo, C.; Olcese, J.; Czeisler, C.A.; Robinson, J.N.; Klerman, E.B.
Title Relationship between endogenous melatonin concentrations and uterine contractions in late third trimester of human pregnancy Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 66 Issue 4 Pages e12566
Keywords Human Health; Melatonin; Pregnancy
Abstract In humans, circulating levels of the hormone melatonin and the initiation of spontaneous labor are both higher at night than during the day. Since activation of uterine melatonin receptors can stimulate human in vitro uterine contractions and these receptors are only expressed on the uterine tissue of women in labor, we hypothesized that circulating melatonin concentrations would affect uterine contractions in vivo. We evaluated the impact of light-induced modulation of melatonin secretion on uterine contractions in women during late third-trimester (~36-39 weeks) of pregnancy in two inpatient protocols. We found a significant (p<0.05) positive linear association between circulating melatonin concentrations and the number of uterine contractions under both protocols. On average, uterine contractions increased between 1.4 to 2.1 contractions per 30 minutes for every 10 pg/ml*h increase in melatonin concentration. These findings have both basic science and clinical implications for pregnant women, since endogenous melatonin levels and melatonin receptor activity can be altered by light and/or pharmaceutical agents.
Address Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30739346 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2203
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Author Hüppop, O.; Ciach, M.; Diehl, R.; Reynolds, D.R.; Stepanian, P.M.; Menz, M.H.M.
Title Perspectives and challenges for the use of radar in biological conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecography Abbreviated Journal Ecography
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract Radar is at the forefront for the study of broad‐scale aerial movements of birds, bats and insects and related issues in biological conservation. Radar techniques are especially useful for investigating species which fly at high altitudes, in darkness, or which are too small for applying electronic tags. Here, we present an overview of radar applications in biological conservation and highlight its future possibilities. Depending on the type of radar, information can be gathered on local‐ to continental‐scale movements of airborne organisms and their behaviour. Such data can quantify flyway usage, biomass and nutrient transport (bioflow), population sizes, dynamics and distributions, times and dimensions of movements, areas and times of mass emergence and swarming, habitat use and activity ranges. Radar also captures behavioural responses to anthropogenic disturbances, artificial light and man‐made structures. Weather surveillance and other long‐range radar networks allow spatially broad overviews of important stopover areas, songbird mass roosts and emergences from bat caves. Mobile radars, including repurposed marine radars and commercially dedicated ‘bird radars’, offer the ability to track and monitor the local movements of individuals or groups of flying animals. Harmonic radar techniques have been used for tracking short‐range movements of insects and other small animals of conservation interest. However, a major challenge in aeroecology is determining the taxonomic identity of the targets, which often requires ancillary data obtained from other methods. Radar data have become a global source of information on ecosystem structure, composition, services and function and will play an increasing role in the monitoring and conservation of flying animals and threatened habitats worldwide.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2204
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Suter, P.M.
Title Gedanken zu Licht und Schlaf [Thoughts about Light and Sleep] Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Praxis Abbreviated Journal Praxis (Bern 1994)
Volume 108 Issue 2 Pages 139-143
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Many aspects of health and disease are mainly determined by the constant change between light and darkness during a solar day. The resulting physiological rhythms correspond to the circadian rhythm, which was one of the most central drivers in the evolution of humans. However, over the last 20-30 years, these natural rhythms of the change of light and darkness are being increasingly ignored by modern societies. It is well known that these rhythms are modulators of many physiological pathways and any desynchronization or misalignment will activate different pathophysiological pathways, which contribute to the risk of chronic diseases. Light pollution by widespread illumination of our environment and the night sky and uncontrolled man-made use of any light source plays a key role in the pathogenesis of sleep disturbances. Blue light exposure in the evening from any artificial light source (especially from electronic device screens) is of special relevance in this context. In this article a few key facts concerning light, sleep and diseases are presented. We should by all means account for the effects of light and darkness and stop any further light pollution.

//

Unser Leben wird durch die sich rhythmisch abwechselnde Helligkeit und Dunkelheit während eines «Solartages» bestimmt, was die Grundlage für den zirkadianen Rhythmus darstellt. Dies war Millionen von Jahren so, und erst in den vergangenen 20–30 Jahren wird diese Rhythmik infolge einer ubiquitären Verwendung von Licht zunehmend ignoriert. Die zirkadiane Rhythmik stellt allerdings eine der zentralsten Determinanten für Gesundheit und Krankheit dar, und man weiss, dass eine Abweichung vom bzw. Desynchronisation des normalen Rhythmus ein hohes pathophysiologisches Potenzial hat und in der Pathogenese der meisten chronischen Erkrankungen eine zentrale Rolle spielt. Die exzessive Beleuchtung der Umgebung und des Nachthimmels wird als Lichtverschmutzung oder «Light Pollution» bezeichnet, die sich unter anderem auch in Schlafstörungen manifestiert. Dabei darf im Besonderen das blaue Licht aus künstlichen Lichtquellen und Bildschirmen am Abend bei der Entstehung von Schlafstörungen nicht ausser Betracht gelassen werden. In diesem Artikel werden einige Aspekte zum Thema Licht, Schlaf und Gesundheit in Erinnerung gerufen und praxisrelevante Zusammenhänge aufgezeigt. Eine Kontrolle der Lichtverschmutzung ist dringend angezeigt.
Address 1 Medizinische Poliklinik, Klinik und Poliklinik fur Innere Medizin, Universitatsspital Zurich
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title Mach nicht zu viel <<blau>>
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1661-8157 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30722742 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2205
Permanent link to this record